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Open Daily: 10am - 10pm | Alley-side Pickup: 10am - 7pm
3038 Hennepin Ave Minneapolis, MN
612-822-4611
Win-Win Negotiation

Win-Win Negotiation

Vasile, Silviu

Paperback

Series: The Culture of Value

General Education

ISBN13: 9798562774668
Publisher: Independently Published
Published: Nov 11 2020
Pages: 126
Weight: 0.39
Height: 0.27 Width: 6.00 Depth: 9.00
Language: English
Whether you like it or not, you are a negotiator. You have to live with this. You have to accept it and do everything in your power to know and master this art. Life is an eternal negotiation, whether it is to negotiate with others to gain a particular advantage or privilege, or it is to deal with yourself the allocation of resources for individual projects. I think the second negotiation may seem more manageable. Still, in reality, it is the hardest because negotiating with yourself means, first of all, to know yourself very well and give yourself the arguments you need to change a state of affairs. Inner change involves personal development and the desire to transform, to evolve.You need a negotiation from which you do not want to win only you; if you do the opposite, it will be for a short time, until the other party realizes that it is losing and will, in return, try to apply the same logic to you. Good negotiation is a negotiation from which both parties have something to gain. It's called a win-win. I consider it a fair negotiation, hence the title of this book.You need to negotiate because you meet people every day and because you interact with different situations. Communication has a purpose and a direction and is directly related to the negotiation process. Here is how your personal development should include the negotiation part, in addition to essential information about leadership, time management, goal setting, and communication, as a mandatory component in your evolutionary process.We live in a world where people have desires; they have values they believe in; they want certain things for themselves and those around them, so everyone negotiates. Achieving something through hard work and sacrifice is a moment of personal glory. But, once completed, that goal tends to become commonplace, and man incorporates it, like any other value, in his portfolio. Let's take the example of a new car. There is the moment of waiting, the emotion and joy of shopping, the pride, and the feeling of personal and social fulfillment. These feelings are immediate to that moment. After a few days, this joy fades, and the mind begins to focus on other goals. And after a while, we have the impression that we have always owned that car. I took this example, but it can be about anything small or big; the mechanism is the same. Some people do not have a personal car, and some people have several vehicles. Some people count their money to buy a private plane, and others count their money for the bus ticket. Regardless of religion, gender, age, or degree of material well-being, we all think alike. It is essential to understand this mechanism from the beginning because we will know how to negotiate if we want to get what we want every time. We will not be satisfied with what we have, and we will want more, but, unfortunately, the resources are limited.

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General Education