The Disenchanted Self: Representing the Subject in the Canterbury Tales

The Disenchanted Self

Representing the Subject in the Canterbury Tales

Paperback
New: $36.95

ISBN10: 0520068335 ISBN13: 9780520068339 Publisher: Univ of California Pr on Demand Published: Jul 1 1990 Weight: 1.40lbs. Height: 9.25" Width: 6.25" Depth: 1.25" Language: English

Publisher's Comments

The question of the "dramatic principle" in the Canterbury Tales, of whether and how the individual tales relate to the pilgrims who are supposed to tell them, has long been a central issue in the interpretation of Chaucer's work. Drawing on ideas from deconstruction, psychoanalysis, and social theory, Leicester proposes that Chaucer can lead us beyond the impasses of contemporary literary theory and suggests new approaches to questions of agency, representation, and the gendered imagination.

Leicester reads the Canterbury Tales as radically voiced and redefines concepts like "self" and "character" in the light of current discussions of language and subjectivity. He argues for Chaucer's disenchanted practical understanding of the constructed character of the self, gender, and society, building his case through close readings of the Pardoner's, Wife of Bath's, and Knight's tales. His study is among the first major treatments of Chaucer's poetry utilizing the techniques of contemporary literary theory and provides new models for reading the poems while revising many older views of them and of Chaucer's relation to his age.

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