Greek Gods, Human Lives: What We Can Learn from Myths

Greek Gods, Human Lives

What We Can Learn from Myths

Paperback
Pub. price: $32.00

ISBN10: 0300107692 ISBN13: 9780300107692 Publisher: Yale Univ Pr Published: May 10 2005 Pages: 288 Weight: 0.92lbs. Height: 9.25" Width: 6.00" Depth: 1.00" Language: English

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Why the Greek myths, more than those of any other culture, continue to captivate us

The mythology of ancient Greece has fascinated readers for two millennia and has formed the basis of Western civilization. The Greek gods are a perennial source of delight because they seem so much like us: in their rages, their love affairs, and their obsession with honor, the gods often appear all too human.

In Greek Gods, Human Lives, preeminent classicist Mary Lefkowitz reintroduces readers to the literature of ancient Greece. Lefkowitz demonstrates that these stories, although endlessly entertaining, are never frivolous. The Greek myths--as told by Homer, Ovid, Virgil, and many others--offer crucial lessons about human experience. Greek mythology makes vivid the fact that the gods control every aspect of the lives of mortals, but not in ways that modern audiences have properly understood. We can learn much from these myths, Lefkowitz shows, if we understand that they are stories about religious experience--about the meaning of divinity, the nature of justice, and the limitations of human knowledge. These myths spoke to ancient audiences and helped them to comprehend their world. With Mary Lefkowitz as an interpreter, these myths speak to us as well.

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