Brooklyn: A Personal Memoir: With the Lost Photographs of David Attie

Brooklyn

A Personal Memoir: With the Lost Photographs of David Attie

Hardcover
Pub. price: $29.95
Near New: $14.99

ISBN10: 1936941112 ISBN13: 9781936941117 Contributors: Attie, David (Photographer); Attie, Eli (AFT); Plimpton, George (Introduction) Publisher: Little Bookroom Published: Nov 3 2015 Pages: 105 Weight: 1.40lbs. Height: 9.50" Width: 8.75" Depth: 0.75" Language: English

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In 2001, The Little Bookroom published Truman Capote's long-out-of-print homage to Brooklyn,A House in the Heights. In 2014, more than fifty years after they were taken, the original photographs commissioned to illustrate the piece have been discovered by the photographer's son. Also found among the negatives were portraits of Capote taken on that same day; none of the photos have ever been published. Now, in a new edition with a new title,Brooklyn: A Personal Memoir With the lost photographs of David Attie, the words and images will be united for the first time. The images of Brooklyn provide a stunning and atmospheric visual portrait of the city in 1959--its building, shops, street life, lost moments-- a Brooklyn at once strangely familiar yet largely vanished: horse-drawn wagons delivering produce to housewives, kids swimming in the East River and getting into mischief on the docks, dimly-lit bars, vintage signs, little girls jumping rope, bricklayers, barbers, neighborhood characters, all set against a backdrop of period architecture, that spectacular bridge, and the skyline of Manhattan. The essay itself brings to life the landscape that was for the author a world of grand homes and dimly recalled gentility, of mysterious warehouses and menacing street thugs, a garden overhung with wisteria, and the famous Promenade and waterfront--all rendered in his deft and stylish prose. Originally commissioned for Holiday magazine by John Knowles (later the author of A Separate Peace), the piece remained one of his favorites--especially its surprise ending. At the time, George Plimpton wrote that in the essay, Capote's "love of history, gossip, character, and a skill at putting all this to words...brings Brooklyn Heights to life as vividly as any landscape Truman ever undertook to survey." David Attie's photos enhance that landscape in a breathtaking way.

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