Open Daily: 10am - 10pm | Alley-side Pickup: 10am - 7pm 3038 Hennepin Ave Minneapolis, MN
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  • Open Daily: 10am - 10pm
    Alley-side Pickup: 10am - 7pm

    3038 Hennepin Ave Minneapolis, MN
    612-822-4611

Open Daily: 10am - 10pm | Alley-side Pickup: 10am - 7pm
3038 Hennepin Ave Minneapolis, MN
612-822-4611
Hard Lessons in a Hard Land: How one National Park Service employee's experience with retaliation reflects the current state of the nation's stewar

Hard Lessons in a Hard Land: How one National Park Service employee's experience with retaliation reflects the current state of the nation's stewar

Kenner, Brian C.

Paperback

Environmental Studies

ISBN13: 9798656462884
Published: May 5 2021
Pages: 472
Weight: 1.51
Height: 1.05 Width: 5.98 Depth: 9.02
Language: English
The National Park Service is one of the most popular federal agencies with the American public. But the agency charged with preserving and protecting the nation's most significant natural and historic places is viewed much more critically by its own employees. There are many reasons for this: evolution of the agency, political interference, poor leadership, failure to incorporate science into management of park resources, and a culture of cronyism and favoritism.After 29 years working for the National Park Service as a park natural resource specialist, and 15 years overseeing programs to preserve endangered black-footed ferrets and prairie dogs, a large bison herd, fossil resources, and native prairie at Badlands National Park, the author found himself targeted by elements within the agency. He spent two years in exile on administrative leave, prevented from working, but still drawing his salary while he fought back against the agency he had served for so many years. He learned hard lessons about speaking out when the Park Service fails its employees and the resources it's supposed to preserve. He faced retaliation and a ruined career without objective investigation or due process, and almost completely in secret. Cases like his are surprisingly common in an agency so concerned about its public image, with secrecy protecting its actions from scrutiny. This book describes this case and shows how it reflects greater problems in the agency. It places the actions against one individual within the context of the many Park Service employees treated similarly in recent years. The author provides context for how the National Park Service has changed in the 21st century and examines how those changes are reflective of the political division in the country today. He also offers solutions to make the agency a better steward of the nation's treasures and a more welcoming place to work.

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Environmental Studies