Upcoming Events

Thursday, February 28, 7:00pm Magers And Quinn Booksellers (map)

Raymond Strom presents Northern Lights

On a clear morning in the summer of 1997, Shane Stephenson arrives in Holm, Minnesota, with only a few changes of clothes, an old Nintendo, and a few dollars to his name. Reeling from the death of his father, Shane wants to find the mother who abandoned him as an adolescent—hoping to reconnect, but also to better understand himself. Against the backdrop of Minnesota’s rugged wilderness, and a town littered with shuttered shops, graffiti, and crumbling infrastructure, Holm feels wild and dangerous.

Holm’s residents, too, are wary of outsiders, and Shane’s long blonde hair and androgynous looks draw attention from a violent and bigoted contingent in town, including the unhinged Sven Svenson. He is drawn in by a group of sympathetic friends in their teens and early twenties, all similarly lost and frequent drug users: the reckless, charming J and his girlfriend Mary; Jenny, a brilliant and beautiful artist who dreams of escaping Holm; and the mysterious loner Russell, with whom Shane, against his better judgment, feels a strange attraction. As Sven’s threats of violence escalate, Shane is forced to choose between his search for his mother, the first true friendships he’s ever had, and a desire to leave both his past and present behind entirely.

At its core, Northern Lights is the story of a son searching for his mother, and for a connection with her, dealing with issues of abandonment and forgiveness. But it also addresses the complications, tensions, and dysfunction that can exist in those relationships, presenting an unforgettable world and experience often overlooked, with a new kind of hero to admire.

"In Raymond Strom’s haunting, propulsive, and beautifully rendered debut, a group of misfits chase transcendence in a dying town. Cut with both violence and tenderness, Northern Lights deftly captures the knife-edge of addiction, the electricity of first love, and the insatiable search for belonging."

—Jessie Chaffee, author of Florence in Ecstasy


Raymond Strom was born in Hibbing, Minnesota, and moved from small town to small town in the Midwest as a child. He received his MFA from the City College of New York, where he now works as an academic advisor and studies romance languages. His writing has appeared in Fiction, Tweed’s, and The New York Times. Northern Lights is his first novel.

Sunday, March 3, 5:00pm Magers And Quinn Booksellers (map)

Mark Conway launches rivers of the driftless region

The driftless region is the corner of southeastern Minnesota untouched by the most recent glaciers. Unlike the rest of the state, there are no glacial deposits, or “drift”. The landscape remains as it was thousands of years ago, a jagged terrain of bluffs, deep gorges and many small fast-running rivers. In these poems, Mark Conway explores this ancient territory and more.

“Intensely aware of the ways that violence and humiliation conspire not just to silence voices but also the capacity to think, Mark Conway has written a daz­zling quest-rodeo of the inner life. rivers of the driftless region takes us inside the lush, divided terrain of the mind exploring how thoughts take up space inside of us—and how we attempt to move through and beyond them. Apertures shatter, vistas open. If these are songs of unenlightenment, they are also lit with a grace that may be as close as we get, with their enthralling mind-singing “ring[ing] / ecstatically off- / key.”

—Mary Szybist, winner of the National Book Award for Incarnadine


Mark Conway’s poems have appeared in The Paris Review, Slate, The American Poetry Review, Ploughshares, PBS NewsHour, The Kenyon Review On-line, Harvard Review, Bomb and the Academy of American Poets Poem-a-Day series, along with critical essays in the Oxford Encyclopedia of American Literature. He has received fellowships from the McKnight Foundation, Jerome Foundation, the Corporation of Yaddo and the MacDowell Colony. He lives in the Avon hills of central Minnesota. 

Tuesday, March 5, 7:00pm Magers And Quinn Booksellers (map)

Ross Gay presents The Book of Delights, in conversation with Lissa Jones (host of Black Market Reads podcast and KMOJ's Urban Agenda). Brought to you by Magers & Quinn and The Givens Foundation for African American Literature.

Join us for a conversation and reading with Ross Gay (author of The Book of Delights) and Lissa Jones (host of Black Market Reads podcast and KMOJ's Urban Agenda).

“Ross Gay’s eye lands upon wonder at every turn, bolstering my belief in the countless small miracles that surround us.” —Tracy K. Smith, Pulitzer Prize winner and U.S. Poet Laureate

The winner of the NBCC Award for Poetry offers up a spirited collection of short lyric essays, written daily over a tumultuous year, reminding us of the purpose and pleasure of praising, extolling, and celebrating ordinary wonders.

Ross Gay’s The Book of Delights is a genre-defying book of essays—some as short as a paragraph; some as long as five pages—that record the small joys that occurred in one year, from birthday to birthday, and that we often overlook in our busy lives. His is a meditation on delight that takes a clear-eyed view of the complexities, even the terrors, in his life, including living in America as a black man; the ecological and psychic violence of our consumer culture; the loss of those he loves. Among Gay’s funny, poetic, philosophical delights: the way Botan Rice Candy wrappers melt in your mouth, the volunteer crossing guard with a pronounced tremor whom he imagines as a kind of boat-woman escorting pedestrians across the River Styx, a friend’s unabashed use of air quotes, pickup basketball games, the silent nod of acknowledgment between black people. And more than any other subject, Gay celebrates the beauty of the natural world—his garden, the flowers in the sidewalk, the birds, the bees, the mushrooms, the trees. Gay’s pieces serve as a powerful and necessary reminder that we can, and should, stake out a space in our lives for delight.

This event is co-presented by Magers & Quinn Booksellers and The Givens Foundation for African American Literature, and will be recorded for an episode of the Black Market Reads podcast, hosted by Lissa Jones. For more information on the podcast, visit www.BlackMarketReads.com.

Ross Gay is the author of three books of poetry, including Catalog of Unabashed Gratitude, winner of the 2015 National Book Critics Circle Award and the 2016 Kingsley Tufts Poetry Award. Catalog was also a finalist for the 2015 National Book Award in Poetry, the Ohioana Book Award, the Balcones Poetry Prize, the Hurston-Wright Legacy Award, and it was nominated for an NAACP Image Award. He is a founding board member of the Bloomington Community Orchard, a non-profit, free-fruit-for-all food justice and joy project. Gay has received fellowships from Cave Canem, the Bread Loaf Writer’s Conference, and the Guggenheim Foundation. He teaches at Indiana University.

Lissa Jones is a highly sought after speaker, facilitator, and mistress of ceremonies. Dubbed a ‘public intellectual’ by Chair Emeritus of American History at Macalester College, Mahmoud El-Kati, Lissa reluctantly takes on the moniker, but readily embraces the opportunity to bring thoughtful examination of African American life and culture into the public discourse on radio, through podcasting, and for a time, through a newspaper column. Lissa is the creator of ‘Urban Agenda’,a weekly program she has hosted on KMOJ Radio, Minnesota’s oldest black radio station, for the last eleven years. Lissa is also the Host of ‘Black Market Reads’, a podcast of the Givens Foundation for African American Literature, amplifying the black literary canon. Lissa is a member of the Twin Cities chapter of Black Journalists, and is co-chair of the ‘Women in the NAACP’ committee for the Minneapolis NAACP.

Wednesday, March 6, 7:00pm The Parkway Theater (map)

Dave Eggers presents The Monk of Mokha, with Mokhtar Alkhanshali. Rescheduled from January 30. Tickets are still available!

6:00pm Doors || 7:00pm Conversation
Book signing to follow
$26 || Tickets available via the Parkway Theater



The Monk of Mokha is the exhilarating true story of a young Yemeni American man, raised in San Francisco, who dreams of resurrecting the ancient art of Yemeni coffee but finds himself trapped in Sana’a by civil war.

Mokhtar Alkhanshali is twenty-four and working as a doorman when he discovers the astonishing history of coffee and Yemen’s central place in it. He leaves San Francisco and travels deep into his ancestral homeland to tour terraced farms high in the country’s rugged mountains and meet beleaguered but determined farmers. But when war engulfs the country and Saudi bombs rain down, Mokhtar has to find a way out of Yemen without sacrificing his dreams or abandoning his people.


Dave Eggers is the author of many books, including: The Circle; Heroes of the Frontier; A Hologram for the King, a finalist for the National Book Award; and What Is the What, a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award, and winner of France's Prix Médicis Etranger and the Dayton Literary Peace Prize. His nonfiction and journalism has appeared in the Guardian, the New Yorker, the Best American Travel Writing and the Best American Essays. He is the founder of McSweeney's, the independent publishing company, and cofounder of 826 Valencia, a youth writing and tutoring center that inspired similar endeavors around the world, and ScholarMatch, which connects donors with students to make college accessible. He is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Letters and his work has been translated into forty-two languages.

Historian, community organizer, and coffee innovator Mokhtar Alkhanshali envisions a world where industry empowers rather than exploits, uplifts rather than represses. Following his studies, he worked with some of the most respected civil rights and community organizations including the ACLU and Asian Law Caucus. On several occasions he’s been requested to partner with the city of San Francisco in working on initiatives regarding civil liberties.

Mokhtar can be found amongst his coffee farmers in remote villages or speaking around the world on topics of social entrepreneurship, community development and, of course, coffee.

Thursday, March 14, 7:00pm Magers And Quinn Booksellers (map)

Randy Shaw presents Generation Priced Out: Who Gets to Live in the New Urban America

Skyrocketing rents and home values are pricing the working and middle classes out of urban America. Randy Shaw tells the powerful stories of tenants, politicians, homeowner groups, developers, and activists in over a dozen cities impacted by the national housing crisis. From San Francisco to New York, Seattle to Denver, and Los Angeles to Austin, Generation Priced Out challenges progressive cities to reverse rising economic and racial inequality.

Shaw exposes how boomer homeowners restrict millennials’ access to housing in big cities, a generational divide that increasingly dominates city politics.  Shaw also demonstrates that neighborhood gentrification is not inevitable and presents proven measures for cities to preserve and expand their working- and middle-class populations and achieve more equitable and inclusive outcomes. Generation Priced Out is a must-read for anyone concerned about the future of urban America.


Randy Shaw is Director of the Tenderloin Housing Clinic, San Francisco’s leading provider of housing for homeless single adults. His previous books include The Activist’s Handbook: Winning Social Change in the 21st Century; Beyond the Fields: Cesar Chavez, the UFW, and the Struggle for Justice in the 21st Century; and The Tenderloin: Sex, Crime, and Resistance in the Heart of San Francisco.

Friday, March 15, 7:00pm Magers And Quinn Booksellers (map)

The Mill City Reading Series is a monthly showcase of works in progress by MFA in Creative Writing students at the University of Minnesota. Please note this event is on a Friday evening, not Sunday afternoon.

For more information visit their Facebook page.

As always, this event is free and open to the public. Don't miss the opportunity to see these fresh faces share their talents, and maybe someday you'll be saying "I saw them when..."

Monday, March 18, 7:00pm Magers And Quinn Booksellers (map)

Nickolas Butler presents Little Faith

Lyle Hovde is at the onset of his golden years, living a mostly content life in rural Wisconsin with his wife, Peg, daughter, Shiloh, and six-year old grandson, Isaac. After a troubled adolescence and subsequent estrangement from her parents, Shiloh has finally come home. But while Lyle is thrilled to have his whole family reunited, he’s also uneasy: in Shiloh’s absence, she has become deeply involved with an extremist church, and the devout pastor courting her is convinced Isaac has the spiritual ability to heal the sick.

While reckoning with his own faith—or lack thereof—Lyle soon finds himself torn between his unease about the church and his desire to keep his daughter and grandson in his life. But when the church’s radical belief system threatens Isaac’s safety, Lyle is forced to make a decision from which the family may not recover. 

Set over the course of one year and beautifully evoking the change of seasons, Little Faith is a powerful and deeply affecting intergenerational novel about family and community, the ways in which belief is both formed and shaken, and the lengths we go to protect our own.

Nickolas Butler was born in Allentown, Pennsylvania, and raised in Eau Claire, Wisconsin.  His writings have appeared in: Narrative Magazine, Ploughshares, The Kenyon Review Online, The Progressive, The Christian Science Monitor, and elsewhere. He is the author of the internationally-best selling novel Shotgun Lovesongs, a collection of short stories entitled Beneath the Bonfire, and The Hearts of Men. A graduate of the University of Wisconsin and the Iowa Writer’s Workshop, he currently lives in Wisconsin with his wife and their two children.

Friday, March 29, 7:00pm Magers And Quinn Booksellers (map)

Siri Hustvedt presents Memories of the Future

“This provocative, experimental novel from Hustvedt (The Blazing World) joins several narratives to illustrate the roles of memory and perspective in making sense of a life...The many moods and flavors of this brash “portrait of the artist as a young woman” constantly reframe and complicate the story, making for a fascinating shape-shifter of a novel.”—Publishers Weekly (Starred Review)

Bestselling author Siri Hustvedt’s new novel, Memories of the Future, is a wildly funny, elaborately structured, and provocative novel about time, memory, and desire.

Fans of Hustvedt’s earlier work will recognize her playful exploration of issues—memory, gender identity, violence of patriarchy, and the biases that shape perception—that have dominated cultural discourse over the past few years. MEMORIES OF THE FUTURE reads, not like a novel for the moment, but rather like the moment is catching up to Siri Hustvedt at last.
 
It tells the story of a young Midwestern woman’s (dubbed “Minnesota”) first year in New York City in the late 1970s, in which she has set out to write her first novel. Her year proves both exhilarating and frightening, from increasingly ominous monologues of the eccentric woman living next door, to the everyday adventures of new independence, to a bruising and indelible assault at her apartment. The relationship she develops with the small coven of women who come to her rescue that night introduces a new understanding of violence, anger, power, identity, and memory.
 
Meanwhile, forty years later, S.H., now a veteran author, discovers her old notebook, as well as early drafts of a never-completed novel while moving her aging mother from one facility to another. Ingeniously juxtaposing the various texts, S.H. measures what she remembers against what she wrote that year and has since forgotten. 

Siri Hustvedt is the internationally acclaimed author of a book of poems, six novels, four collections of essays, and a work of nonfiction. In 2012 she was awarded the International Gabarron Prize for Thought and Humanities. Her novel The Blazing World was longlisted for the Man Booker Prize and won the Lost Angeles Book Prize for Fiction. She has also published numerous papers in scholarly and scientific journals. She has a PhD in English literature from Columbia University and is a Lecturer in Psychiatry at Weill Cornell Medical College. Her work has been translated into over thirty languages. She lives in Brooklyn, New York.

Sunday, March 31, 5:00pm Magers And Quinn Booksellers (map)

Evan James presents Cheer Up, Mr. Widdicombe

“Cheer Up, Mr. Widdicombe is shrewd as hell and hysterically funny. A summer novel, a comedy of manners, a razor-sharp satire of the idle rich…there’s so much unbridled pleasure to be found in this rogue’s gallery of new-age self-help gurus, aspiring screenwriters, bird-watching party-planning social climbers, lovesick assistants, despondent patriarchs, ne’er-do-well houseguests, indolent watercolorists, and loveably loathsome cads of all kinds.”— Carmen Maria Machado, author of Her Body and Other Parties

The inimitable—some might say incorrigible—Frank Widdicombe is suffering from a deep depression. Or so his wife, Carol, believes. But Carol is convinced that their new island home—Willowbrook Manor on the Puget Sound—is just the thing to cheer her husband up. And so begins a whirlwind summer as their house becomes the epicenter of multiple social dramas involving the family, their friends, and a host of new acquaintances.

The Widdicombes’ son, Christopher, mourns a heartbreak after a year abroad in Italy. Their personal assistant, Michelle, begins a romance with preppy screenwriter Bradford. Meanwhile, a local named Marvelous Matthews is hired to create a garden at the manor—and is elated to find Gracie Sloane, bewitching self-help author, in residence as well. When this alternately bumbling and clever cast of characters comes together, Willowbrook transforms into a circus of uncovered secrets, preposterous misunderstandings, and irrepressible passions.


Evan James is an award-winning writer whose personal essays and fiction have appeared in such publications as the Oxford American, Travel + Leisure, and The New York Times, among others. He received an MFA in Fiction from the Iowa Writers’ Workshop and has received fellowships from Yaddo, Virginia Center for the Creative Arts, The Carson McCullers Center, The Elizabeth Kostova Foundation, The University of Iowa, and the Lambda Literary Writers’ Retreat, where he was a 2017 Emerging LGBTQ Voices Fellow. He has taught at The University of Iowa, The Iowa Young Writers’ Studio, and Victoria University of Wellington in New Zealand. Born in Seattle, he now lives in New York and teaches creative writing and English at Pierrepont School in Westport, Connecticut.

Monday, April 1, 7:00pm Magers And Quinn Booksellers (map)

Doug Walsh presents Tailwinds Past Florence

Join us for a travel presentation & book signing with the author of Tailwinds Past Florence, a road-tripping love story with a time travel twist.

After getting blacklisted from the venture capital industry, twenty-nine-year-old Edward Vaughan will do anything to avoid telling his wife what happened. Even if it means agreeing to her dream of bicycling around the world. Kara, tired of being married to a workaholic, was readying for a divorce. Now, she's packing bags of a different kind. Together, they pedal away from Seattle, headed east on the open road across America, Europe, and beyond.

It's a decision that reverberates across centuries, shattering a continuum that bound their souls throughout time, and traps Edward in a battle with a past life over an eternal love.

As the miles roll by, and the deceits begin to surface, the couple encounters several men plucked from history, each one a vessel of Edward's soul in a prior life. Of them, a 19th century art dealer proves dangerous, believing Kara is his ticket back to the past.

Inspired by Walsh's years traveling the world via bike, Tailwinds Past Florence is a contemporary love story with a magical twist, landing readers in the saddle of a global bicycle adventure.

Doug Walsh was born in New Jersey and now writes from the Snoqualmie Valley in Washington state. A longtime author of video game strategy guides for Brady Games, Tailwinds Past Florence marks his debut into fiction. The novel was inspired by his round-the-world bicycle travels.

Tuesday, April 2, 7:00pm Magers And Quinn Booksellers (map)

Duncan Hannah presents Twentieth Century Boy: Notebooks of the Seventies

“Arriving in New York in 1973, the Minneapolis-born painter Duncan Hannah quickly immersed himself in the downtown art-and-music scene. These journal entries from the time chronicle young adulthood and a phantasmagoria of alcohol, sex, art, conversation, glam rock, and New Wave cinema. Hannah’s writing combines self-aware humor with an intoxicating punk energy.” —The New Yorker

Celebrated painter Duncan Hannah arrived in New York City from Minneapolis in the early 1970s as an art student hungry for experience, game for almost anything, and with a prodigious taste for drugs, girls, alcohol, movies, rock and roll, books, parties, and everything else the city had to offer. Taken directly from the notebooks Hannah kept throughout the decade, Twentieth-Century Boy is a fascinating, sometimes lurid, and incredibly entertaining report from a now almost mythical time and place. Full of outrageously bad behavior, naked ambition, fantastically good music, and evaporating barriers of taste and decorum, and featuring cameos from David Bowie, Andy Warhol, Patti Smith, and many more, it is a rollicking account of an artist’s coming of age.

Duncan Hannah was born in Minneapolis in 1952. He attended Bard College from 1971 to 1973 and Parsons School of Design from 1973 to 1975. His work is in numerous public and private collections, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Minneapolis Art Institute. Twentieth Century Boy: Notebooks of the Seventies is his first book. 

Monday, April 8, 7:00pm Magers And Quinn Booksellers (map)

G. Willow Wilson presents The Bird King

G. Willow Wilson enchanted readers with her debut novel Alif the Unseen (a New York Times Notable Book and a staple of year-end “Best of” lists), has won praise in the world of comics as the co-creator of the celebrated Ms. Marvel, and she was recently tapped to bring her storytelling skills to the Wonder Woman franchise. Wilson’s thrilling new novel, The Bird King, transports readers into the height of the Spanish Inquisition to witness the fantastical journey of Fatima, the only remaining Circassian concubine to the sultan of Granada, and her dearest friend Hassan, the palace mapmaker.

It’s 1491 and a party representing the newly formed Spanish monarchy arrives to negotiate the terms of the sultan’s surrender, but Hassan has a secret—he can make maps of places he’s never seen and bend the shape of reality with his pen and paper. His magical gift, which has proven useful to the sultan’s armies in wartime and entertained a bored Fatima who has never stepped foot outside the palace walls, could now be seen as sorcery and a threat to the Christian Spanish rule. Fatima befriends one of the women, little realizing that her new friend Luz represents the Inquisition and soon Fatima must risk everything to save Hassan, and taste the freedom she has never known.

G. Willow Wilson is the author of the critically acclaimed novel Alif the Unseen, the memoir The Butterfly Mosque, and the graphic novels Cairo, Air, and Vixen. She co-created the celebrated comic book series Ms. Marvel starring Kamala Khan, winner of the 2015 Hugo Award for Best Graphic Story, and recently debuted as writer of the Wonder Woman comics. She currently lives in Seattle.

Thursday, April 11, 7:00pm Magers And Quinn Booksellers (map)

Robert Rorke presents Car Trouble

Set in 1970s Brooklyn, Car Trouble is an uncommonly warm coming of age debut novel from a fierce new talent. The story follows Nicky Flynn: an aspiring young actor at St. Michaels Diocesan high school. Nicky is keenly observant—especially when it comes to his abusive, alcoholic father, Patrick. Enigmatic, coasting on charm and desperation, Patrick enjoys picking up old junkers for cheap at NYPD auctions—each sputtering, tail-finned treasure subsidized by poker games. But when Patrick’s love for broken-down vintage cars begins to rival his obsession with alcohol, he threatens his family’s stability and careens wildly out of control.

Robert Rorke was born and raised and lives in Brooklyn. He is a TV editor at the New York Post who has also previously written for Publishers Weekly, TV Guide, Los Angeles Times, and Seventeen. He received his MFA from Warren Wilson College and his MA in English from Stanford University.

Thursday, April 18, 7:00pm Magers And Quinn Booksellers (map)

Rabeah Ghaffari presents To Keep the Sun Alive, in conversation with Professor Bill Beeman of the University of Minnesota. Rescheduled from January 30!

The year is 1979. The Iranian Revolution is just around the corner, as is a once-in-a-lifetime solar eclipse. Meanwhile, in the northeastern city of Naishapur, a retired judge and his wife, Bibi, run an ancient orchard, growing apples, plums, peaches, and sour cherries, and looking after several generations of family members. The days here are marked by long, elaborate lunches on the terrace and arguments about government corruption and the rise of religious fundamentalism, peppered with tales of ancient Persia that foreshadow the seismic political changes to come.

And yet life continues. Bibi, the matriarch, struggles to keep her family together. Her young nephew goes to university, hoping to lead the fight for a new Iran and marry his childhood sweetheart. Another nephew surrenders to opium, while his father longs for a life in Europe. Her brother-in-law evolves into a powerful Islamic cleric while her husband retreats into intellectual reflection.

Told through a host of vivid, unforgettable characters, ranging from children to servants to friends of the family, To Keep the Sun Alive is the kind of compelling, rich story that not only informs the past, but also reminds us of the human aspirations that animate historical events.


Rabeah Ghaffari was born in Iran and lives in New York City. She is a filmmaker and writer, whose collaborative fiction with artist Shirin Neshat was featured in Reflections on Islamic Art, and her documentary, The Troupe, featured Tony Kushner. To Keep the Sun Alive is her first novel.

William O. Beeman is Professor of Anthropology at the University of Minnesota. He has conducted research in the Middle East for more than 40 years with special expertise in Iran and the Persian Gulf region. His expertise has been widely sought as advisor to the U.S. State Department, the Department of Defense, the United Nations, and the European Union. He is author or editor of more than 100 scholarly articles, 500 opinion pieces and 14 books, including Language, Status and Power in Iran, and The "Great Satan" vs. the "Mad Mullahs": How the United States and Iran Demonize Each Other. In addition, he has written extensively on music and performance traditions both in Western and non-Western traditions. His latest book on this topic is Iranian Performance Traditions. He is currently Visiting Scholar at Stanford University where he is completing two books: Understanding Iran, and Music, Emotion and Evolution.

Wednesday, May 1, 7:00pm Magers And Quinn Booksellers (map)

Heidi Barr presents What Comes Next

Job loss.  It’s not something that most people want to think about, whether it happens to them or not – but in modern society, it’s all too common for the words “lay off” and “company downsize” to grace a conversation about how life is going.  Through an honest look at the emotions, feelings, and everyday challenges that can come with losing a job, author Heidi Barr illustrates what going through such an event is like. From disbelief to financial concerns to anxiety over the prospect of a two hour commute after ten years of working from home, this essay explores the uncertainty of not knowing what might be coming next, along with the potential for uncovering the beauty that might just be hidden under what feels like destruction.

Heidi Barr lives in Minnesota with her husband and daughter where they tend a large organic vegetable garden, explore nature and do their best to live simply.  As a mother, spouse, gardener, and wellness coach, she is committed to cultivating ways of being that are life-giving and sustainable for people, communities and the planet. Visit her at heidibarr.com.