Upcoming Events

Thursday, January 17, 7:00pm Magers And Quinn Booksellers (map)

Brian DeVore presents Wildly Successful Farming: Sustainability and the New Agricultural Land Ethic

Wildly Successful Farming: Sustainability and the New Agricultural Land Ethic tells the stories of farmers across the Midwest who are balancing profitability and food production with environmental sustainability and a passion for all things wild. They are using innovative techniques and strategies to develop their “wildly” successful farms as working ecosystems. Whether producing grain, vegetables, fruit, meat, or milk, these next-generation agrarians look beyond the bottom line of the spreadsheet to the biological activity on the land as key measures of success.

Written by agricultural journalist and podcaster Brian DeVore, the book is based on interviews he has conducted at farms, wildlife refuges, laboratories, test plots, and gardens over the past twenty-five years. His accounts provide insight into the impacts regenerative farming methods can have on wildlife, water, landscape, soils, climate, and rural communities, and suggest ways all of us can support wildly successful farmers.


Brian DeVore is a contributor to farm and conservation magazines and an editor with the Land Stewardship Project in Minnesota, where he produces the Ear to the Ground podcast. He grew up on a crop and livestock farm in southwestern Iowa and, while serving in the Peace Corps, managed a dairy cooperative in Lesotho, Africa.

Wednesday, January 23, 7:00pm Magers And Quinn Booksellers (map)

Tim Johnston presents The Current

In the dead of winter, outside a small Minnesota town, state troopers pull two young women and their automobile from the icy Black Root River. One is pronounced dead at the scene, while the other, Audrey Sutter, daughter of the town’s retired sheriff, survives. What happened was no accident, and news of the crime awakens memories of another young woman who lost her life in the same river ten years prior, and whose killer may still be among them. Determined to find answers, Audrey soon realizes that she is connected to that earlier unsolved murder by more than just a river. And as she plungers deeper into her own investigation, she begins to unearth long hidden secrets and stoke the violence simmering just below the surface of her hometown.

“This novel is careful layer upon careful layer, as deceptively thick yet brutally delicate as winter ice itself. Johnston's descriptions of people, places, grief, and loneliness are subtle and evocative; the minor plot about an aging dog becomes a rending portrait of the ravages of love.”
Kirkus Reviews, starred review


Tim Johnston is the author of the New York Times bestseller Descent, the story collection Irish Girl, and the young adult novel Never So Green. Published in 2009, the stories in Irish Girl won an O. Henry Prize, the New Letters Award for Writers, and the Gival Press Short Story Award, while the collection itself won the 2009 Katherine Anne Porter Prize in Short Fiction. Johnston’s stories have also appeared in New England Review, New Letters, the Iowa Review, the Missouri Review, DoubleTake, Best Life Magazine, and Narrative Magazine, among others. He holds degrees from the University of Iowa and the University of Massachusetts, Amherst.

Thursday, January 24, 7:00pm Magers And Quinn Booksellers (map)

Tessa Hadley presents Late in the Day, in partnership with Rain Taxi and in conversation with Curtis Sittenfeld

Join us for a special Magers & Quinn / Rain Taxi event, when notable British author Tessa Hadley visits to discuss her newest book. Refreshments will follow this free reading.

In Late in the Day, the lives of two close-knit couples are irrevocably changed by an untimely death. The book explores the complexity of our most intimate relationships, and exposes how alternate configurations lie beneath the seemingly dependable arrangements we make for our lives. Ingeniously moving between past and present and through the intricacies of her characters’ thoughts and interactions, Tessa Hadley once again “crystallizes the atmosphere of ordinary life in prose somehow miraculous and natural” (Washington Post).

Tessa Hadley is the author of five previous novels, including The Past, and three short story collections. Her first novel, Accidents in the Home, was longlisted for The Guardian First Book Award, and she has since won or made the shortlists for top fiction awards such as the O. Henry Prize, the Story Prize, the Orange Prize, and the Frank O’Connor International Short Story Award. In 2016 she was awarded the Windham-Campbell Literature Prize for fiction. She is also the author of a critical study, Henry James and the Imagination of Pleasure, and has contributed stories to The New Yorker. She lives in London.

Curtis Sittenfeld is the bestselling author of five novels: Prep, The Man of My Dreams, American Wife, Sisterland, and Eligible. Her first story collection, You Think It, I’ll Say It, will be published in 2018. Her books have been selected by The New York Times, Time, Entertainment Weekly, and People for their “Ten Best Books of the Year” lists, optioned for television and film, and translated into thirty languages.

Friday, January 25, 7:00pm Magers And Quinn Booksellers (map)

Zach Vertin presents A Rope from the Sky, in conversation with Mary Curtin of the University of Minnesota's Humphrey School of Public Affairs

South Sudan’s historic independence was celebrated around the world — a triumph for global justice and a signal that one of the world’s most devastating wars was finally over. The new Republic’s birth was acclaimed not only by its long-oppressed people, but by three U.S. presidents and the legions of Americans who championed their cause. But the party would not last long; South Sudan’s freedom-fighters soon plunged their new nation back into chaos, shattering the promise of liberation and exposing the hubris of their American backers.

Drawing on extraordinary personal stories of identity, liberation, and survival, A Rope from the Sky tells an epic story of paradise won and then lost. Zach Vertin’s firsthand accounts ― from deadly war zones to the halls of Washington power ― bring readers on an extraordinary journey into the rise and fall of the world’s newest state. South Sudan’s untold story is a unique episode in global history, an unprecedented experiment in international state-building, and a cautionary tale.

“A brilliant, authoritative, and colorful insight into the hope and despair that is the world’s youngest country. Unique in modern history, this untold story of South Sudan’s birth carries lessons not just for Africa but for the rest of the world.”—Jon Snow, Journalist and Anchor, Channel 4 News London


Zach Vertin is an American writer, foreign policy expert, and former diplomat; he has spent the last twelve years working in international peace and conflict issues.  He is currently a Lecturer at Princeton University and a Visiting Fellow at the Brookings Institution’s Doha Center. He previously served in the Obama Administration as a Senior Adviser to the U.S. Special Envoy to Sudan and Sudan South Sudan, and prior to that he was a Senior Analyst for the International Crisis Group. He has written or commented for The New York Times, The Washington Post, The Wall Street Journal, The Financial Times, Foreign Affairs, The Economist, The Atlantic, CNN, the BBC, and more.  He lives in Washington, DC.

Mary T. Curtin, PhD, a Minnesota native, joined the Humphrey School of Public Affairs at the University of Minnesota as diplomat-in-residence in 2013 after a twenty-five year career as a Department of State Foreign Service Officer.  As diplomat-in-residence, she teaches courses in foreign policy and diplomacy and serves as coordinator for the Humphrey School's global policy area. Curtin earned a PhD in History from Columbia University in the City of New York (1986), writing her dissertation on "Hubert H. Humphrey and the Politics of the Cold War, 1943-1954,” a master's degree in security studies from the Army War College (2003), and a BA from the University of Notre Dame (1977).

Monday, January 28, 7:00pm Magers And Quinn Booksellers (map)

Peter Sagal presents The Incomplete Book of Running (rescheduled from 11/26)

Peter Sagal, the host of NPR’s Wait Wait...Don’t Tell Me! and a popular columnist for Runner’s World, shares lessons, stories, advice, and warnings gleaned from running the equivalent of once around the earth.

At the verge of turning forty, Peter Sagal—brainiac Harvard grad, short bald Jew with a disposition towards heft, and a sedentary star of public radio—started running seriously. And much to his own surprise, he kept going, faster and further, running fourteen marathons and logging tens of thousands of miles on roads, sidewalks, paths, and trails all over the United States and the world, including the 2013 Boston Marathon, where he crossed the finish line moments before the bombings.

In this new book, Sagal reflects on the trails, tracks, and routes he’s traveled, from the humorous absurdity of running charity races in his underwear—in St. Louis, in February—or attempting to “quiet his colon” on runs around his neighborhood—to the experience of running as a guide to visually impaired runners, and the triumphant post-bombing running of the Boston Marathon in 2014. With humor and humanity, Sagal also writes about the emotional experience of running, body image, the similarities between endurance sports and sadomasochism, the legacy of running as passed down from parent to child, and the odd but extraordinary bonds created between strangers and friends. The result is a funny, wise, and powerful meditation about running and life that will appeal to readers everywhere.


Peter Sagal is the host of the Peabody Award-winning NPR news quiz Wait Wait...Don’t Tell Me!, the most popular show on public radio, heard by five million listeners each week. He is also a playwright, a screenwriter, the host of Constitution USA with Peter Sagal on PBS, a one-time extra in a Michael Jackson music video, a contributor to publications from Opera News to The Magazine of the AARP and a featured columnist in Runner’s World. He’s run fourteen marathons across the United States. Sagal lives near Chicago with his wife Mara.

Wednesday, January 30, 7:00pm Magers And Quinn Booksellers (map)

Rabeah Ghaffari presents To Keep the Sun Alive, in conversation with William O. Beeman

The year is 1979. The Iranian Revolution is just around the corner, as is a once-in-a-lifetime solar eclipse. Meanwhile, in the northeastern city of Naishapur, a retired judge and his wife, Bibi, run an ancient orchard, growing apples, plums, peaches, and sour cherries, and looking after several generations of family members. The days here are marked by long, elaborate lunches on the terrace and arguments about government corruption and the rise of religious fundamentalism, peppered with tales of ancient Persia that foreshadow the seismic political changes to come.

And yet life continues. Bibi, the matriarch, struggles to keep her family together. Her young nephew goes to university, hoping to lead the fight for a new Iran and marry his childhood sweetheart. Another nephew surrenders to opium, while his father longs for a life in Europe. Her brother-in-law evolves into a powerful Islamic cleric while her husband retreats into intellectual reflection.

Told through a host of vivid, unforgettable characters, ranging from children to servants to friends of the family, To Keep the Sun Alive is the kind of compelling, rich story that not only informs the past, but also reminds us of the human aspirations that animate historical events.


Rabeah Ghaffari was born in Iran and lives in New York City. She is a filmmaker and writer, whose collaborative fiction with artist Shirin Neshat was featured in Reflections on Islamic Art, and her documentary, The Troupe, featured Tony Kushner. To Keep the Sun Alive is her first novel.

William O. Beeman is Professor of Anthropology at the University of Minnesota. He has conducted research in the Middle East for more than 40 years with special expertise in Iran and the Persian Gulf region. His expertise has been widely sought as advisor to the U.S. State Department, the Department of Defense, the United Nations, and the European Union. He is author or editor of more than 100 scholarly articles, 500 opinion pieces and 14 books, including Language, Status and Power in Iran, and The "Great Satan" vs. the "Mad Mullahs": How the United States and Iran Demonize Each Other. In addition, he has written extensively on music and performance traditions both in Western and non-Western traditions. His latest book on this topic is Iranian Performance Traditions. He is currently Visiting Scholar at Stanford University where he is completing two books: Understanding Iran, and Music, Emotion and Evolution.

Wednesday, January 30, 7:00pm The Parkway Theater (map)

Dave Eggers presents The Monk of Mokha, with Mokhtar Alkhanshali

6:00pm Doors || 7:00pm Conversation
Book signing to follow
$26 || Tickets available via the Parkway Theater



The Monk of Mokha is the exhilarating true story of a young Yemeni American man, raised in San Francisco, who dreams of resurrecting the ancient art of Yemeni coffee but finds himself trapped in Sana’a by civil war.

Mokhtar Alkhanshali is twenty-four and working as a doorman when he discovers the astonishing history of coffee and Yemen’s central place in it. He leaves San Francisco and travels deep into his ancestral homeland to tour terraced farms high in the country’s rugged mountains and meet beleaguered but determined farmers. But when war engulfs the country and Saudi bombs rain down, Mokhtar has to find a way out of Yemen without sacrificing his dreams or abandoning his people.



Dave Eggers is the author of many books, including: The Circle; Heroes of the Frontier; A Hologram for the King, a finalist for the National Book Award; and What Is the What, a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award, and winner of France's Prix Médicis Etranger and the Dayton Literary Peace Prize. His nonfiction and journalism has appeared in the Guardian, the New Yorker, the Best American Travel Writing and the Best American Essays. He is the founder of McSweeney's, the independent publishing company, and cofounder of 826 Valencia, a youth writing and tutoring center that inspired similar endeavors around the world, and ScholarMatch, which connects donors with students to make college accessible. He is a member of the American Academy of Arts and Letters and his work has been translated into forty-two languages.

Historian, community organizer, and coffee innovator Mokhtar Alkhanshali envisions a world where industry empowers rather than exploits, uplifts rather than represses. Following his studies, he worked with some of the most respected civil rights and community organizations including the ACLU and Asian Law Caucus. On several occasions he’s been requested to partner with the city of San Francisco in working on initiatives regarding civil liberties.

Mokhtar can be found amongst his coffee farmers in remote villages or speaking around the world on topics of social entrepreneurship, community development and, of course, coffee.

Wednesday, February 13, 7:00pm Magers And Quinn Booksellers (map)

Frank Weber presents The I-94 Murders

In The I-94 Murders, Investigator Jon Frederick returns in a search to uncover the identity of a killer creeping through communities along I-94 in Minnesota, targeting couples who store their fetish photos online. Driven to find the killer, Detective Frederick must use his wits, old-school police work, cutting-edge forensics and his own specially created algorithm to identify and catch a cunning criminal who is preying on the BDSM community. This mysterious killer, known only as Culhwch, leads readers on a terrifying journey of demented thinking, sexual desire, cipher-filled messages and a trail of bodies.

Along the way, Jon Fredrick must not only solve the most puzzling cases of his career, he must find a way to stay in his young daughter's life while not letting his heart be trampled again by his former lover, Serena. Within every character in The I-94 Murders is a carefully crafted depth and realness that all readers can relate to. Along with murder, deception and fear, examples of real human struggle with intimacy, shame and trust are skillfully interwoven into this gripping story.   


Frank Weber has spent a large portion of his life in service to those in need. As the clinic director at CORE Professional Services, P.A, his work involves outpatient services and forensic psychology.  His work has ranged from assessing murderers chained to the cement floor in the basement of a prison and assessing psychopaths to providing therapy for wealthy professionals who’ve engaged in multiple affairs. Weber has testified as an expert witness in numerous sexual assault and homicide cases and has received the President’s Award from the Minnesota Correctional Association for his forensic work. His newest novel, The I-94 Murders, is the follow up to his highly-acclaimed novel, Murder Book.

Tuesday, February 19, 7:00pm Magers And Quinn Booksellers (map)

Chris Cander presents The Weight of a Piano, in conversation with Peter Geye (Wintering)

In 1962, in the Soviet Union, eight-year-old Katya is bequeathed what will become the love of her life: a Blüthner piano, built at the turn of the century in Germany, on which she discovers everything that she herself can do with music and what music, in turn, does for her. Yet after marrying, she emigrates with her young family from Russia to America, at her husband's frantic insistence, and her piano is lost in the shuffle.

In 2012, in Bakersfield, California, twenty-six-year-old Clara Lundy loses another boyfriend and again has to find a new apartment, which is complicated by the gift her father had given her for her twelfth birthday, shortly before he and her mother died in a fire that burned their house down: a Blüthner upright she has never learned to play. Orphaned, she was raised by her aunt and uncle, who in his car-repair shop trained her to become a first-rate mechanic, much to the surprise of her subsequent customers. But this work, her true mainstay in a scattered life, is put on hold when her hand gets broken while the piano's being moved--and in sudden frustration she chooses to sell it. And what becomes crucial is who the most interested party turns out to be...


Chris Cander graduated from the Honors College at the University of Houston, in the city where she was raised and still lives, with her husband, daughter, and son. For seven years she has been a writer-in-residence for Writers in the Schools there. She serves on the Inprint advisory board and stewards several Little Free Libraries in her community. Her first novel, 11 Stories, won the Independent Publisher Gold Medal for Popular Fiction, and her most recent, Whisper Hollow, was long-listed for the Great Santini Fiction Prize by the Southern Independent Booksellers Alliance. She is also the author of The Word Burglar, which won the 2014 Moonbeam Children's Book Award (silver).

Peter Geye is the award winning author of Safe from the Sea, The Lighthouse Road, and Wintering, the winner of the 2017 Minnesota Book Award for novel / short story. He holds an MFA from the University of New Orleans and a PhD from Western Michigan University, where he was editor of Third Coast. He's a regular teaching artist at The Loft. He was born and raised in Minneapolis where he still lives.

Thursday, February 28, 7:00pm Magers And Quinn Booksellers (map)

Raymond Strom presents Northern Lights

On a clear morning in the summer of 1997, Shane Stephenson arrives in Holm, Minnesota, with only a few changes of clothes, an old Nintendo, and a few dollars to his name. Reeling from the death of his father, Shane wants to find the mother who abandoned him as an adolescent—hoping to reconnect, but also to better understand himself. Against the backdrop of Minnesota’s rugged wilderness, and a town littered with shuttered shops, graffiti, and crumbling infrastructure, Holm feels wild and dangerous.

Holm’s residents, too, are wary of outsiders, and Shane’s long blonde hair and androgynous looks draw attention from a violent and bigoted contingent in town, including the unhinged Sven Svenson. He is drawn in by a group of sympathetic friends in their teens and early twenties, all similarly lost and frequent drug users: the reckless, charming J and his girlfriend Mary; Jenny, a brilliant and beautiful artist who dreams of escaping Holm; and the mysterious loner Russell, with whom Shane, against his better judgment, feels a strange attraction. As Sven’s threats of violence escalate, Shane is forced to choose between his search for his mother, the first true friendships he’s ever had, and a desire to leave both his past and present behind entirely.

At its core, Northern Lights is the story of a son searching for his mother, and for a connection with her, dealing with issues of abandonment and forgiveness. But it also addresses the complications, tensions, and dysfunction that can exist in those relationships, presenting an unforgettable world and experience often overlooked, with a new kind of hero to admire.

"In Raymond Strom’s haunting, propulsive, and beautifully rendered debut, a group of misfits chase transcendence in a dying town. Cut with both violence and tenderness, Northern Lights deftly captures the knife-edge of addiction, the electricity of first love, and the insatiable search for belonging."

—Jessie Chaffee, author of Florence in Ecstasy


Raymond Strom was born in Hibbing, Minnesota, and moved from small town to small town in the Midwest as a child. He received his MFA from the City College of New York, where he now works as an academic advisor and studies romance languages. His writing has appeared in Fiction, Tweed’s, and The New York Times. Northern Lights is his first novel.

Sunday, March 3, 5:00pm Magers And Quinn Booksellers (map)

Mark Conway launches rivers of the driftless region

The driftless region is the corner of southeastern Minnesota untouched by the most recent glaciers. Unlike the rest of the state, there are no glacial deposits, or “drift”. The landscape remains as it was thousands of years ago, a jagged terrain of bluffs, deep gorges and many small fast-running rivers. In these poems, Mark Conway explores this ancient territory and more.

“Intensely aware of the ways that violence and humiliation conspire not just to silence voices but also the capacity to think, Mark Conway has written a daz­zling quest-rodeo of the inner life. rivers of the driftless region takes us inside the lush, divided terrain of the mind exploring how thoughts take up space inside of us—and how we attempt to move through and beyond them. Apertures shatter, vistas open. If these are songs of unenlightenment, they are also lit with a grace that may be as close as we get, with their enthralling mind-singing “ring[ing] / ecstatically off- / key.”

—Mary Szybist, winner of the National Book Award for Incarnadine



Mark Conway’s poems have appeared in The Paris Review, Slate, The American Poetry Review, Ploughshares, PBS NewsHour, The Kenyon Review On-line, Harvard Review, Bomb and the Academy of American Poets Poem-a-Day series, along with critical essays in the Oxford Encyclopedia of American Literature. He has received fellowships from the McKnight Foundation, Jerome Foundation, the Corporation of Yaddo and the MacDowell Colony. He lives in the Avon hills of central Minnesota. 

Tuesday, March 5, 7:00pm Magers And Quinn Booksellers (map)

Ross Gay presents The Book of Delights

“Ross Gay’s eye lands upon wonder at every turn, bolstering my belief in the countless small miracles that surround us.” —Tracy K. Smith, Pulitzer Prize winner and U.S. Poet Laureate

The winner of the NBCC Award for Poetry offers up a spirited collection of short lyric essays, written daily over a tumultuous year, reminding us of the purpose and pleasure of praising, extolling, and celebrating ordinary wonders.

Ross Gay’s The Book of Delights is a genre-defying book of essays—some as short as a paragraph; some as long as five pages—that record the small joys that occurred in one year, from birthday to birthday, and that we often overlook in our busy lives. His is a meditation on delight that takes a clear-eyed view of the complexities, even the terrors, in his life, including living in America as a black man; the ecological and psychic violence of our consumer culture; the loss of those he loves. Among Gay’s funny, poetic, philosophical delights: the way Botan Rice Candy wrappers melt in your mouth, the volunteer crossing guard with a pronounced tremor whom he imagines as a kind of boat-woman escorting pedestrians across the River Styx, a friend’s unabashed use of air quotes, pickup basketball games, the silent nod of acknowledgment between black people. And more than any other subject, Gay celebrates the beauty of the natural world—his garden, the flowers in the sidewalk, the birds, the bees, the mushrooms, the trees. Gay’s pieces serve as a powerful and necessary reminder that we can, and should, stake out a space in our lives for delight.


Ross Gay is the author of three books of poetry, including Catalog of Unabashed Gratitude, winner of the 2015 National Book Critics Circle Award and the 2016 Kingsley Tufts Poetry Award. Catalog was also a finalist for the 2015 National Book Award in Poetry, the Ohioana Book Award, the Balcones Poetry Prize, the Hurston-Wright Legacy Award, and it was nominated for an NAACP Image Award. He is a founding board member of the Bloomington Community Orchard, a non-profit, free-fruit-for-all food justice and joy project. Gay has received fellowships from Cave Canem, the Bread Loaf Writer’s Conference, and the Guggenheim Foundation. He teaches at Indiana University.

Thursday, March 14, 7:00pm Magers And Quinn Booksellers (map)

Randy Shaw presents Generation Priced Out: Who Gets to Live in the New Urban America

Skyrocketing rents and home values are pricing the working and middle classes out of urban America. Randy Shaw tells the powerful stories of tenants, politicians, homeowner groups, developers, and activists in over a dozen cities impacted by the national housing crisis. From San Francisco to New York, Seattle to Denver, and Los Angeles to Austin, Generation Priced Out challenges progressive cities to reverse rising economic and racial inequality.

Shaw exposes how boomer homeowners restrict millennials’ access to housing in big cities, a generational divide that increasingly dominates city politics.  Shaw also demonstrates that neighborhood gentrification is not inevitable and presents proven measures for cities to preserve and expand their working- and middle-class populations and achieve more equitable and inclusive outcomes. Generation Priced Out is a must-read for anyone concerned about the future of urban America.


Randy Shaw is Director of the Tenderloin Housing Clinic, San Francisco’s leading provider of housing for homeless single adults. His previous books include The Activist’s Handbook: Winning Social Change in the 21st Century; Beyond the Fields: Cesar Chavez, the UFW, and the Struggle for Justice in the 21st Century; and The Tenderloin: Sex, Crime, and Resistance in the Heart of San Francisco.

Sunday, March 31, 5:00pm Magers And Quinn Booksellers (map)

Evan James presents Cheer Up, Mr. Widdicombe

“Cheer Up, Mr. Widdicombe is shrewd as hell and hysterically funny. A summer novel, a comedy of manners, a razor-sharp satire of the idle rich…there’s so much unbridled pleasure to be found in this rogue’s gallery of new-age self-help gurus, aspiring screenwriters, bird-watching party-planning social climbers, lovesick assistants, despondent patriarchs, ne’er-do-well houseguests, indolent watercolorists, and loveably loathsome cads of all kinds.”— Carmen Maria Machado, author of Her Body and Other Parties

The inimitable—some might say incorrigible—Frank Widdicombe is suffering from a deep depression. Or so his wife, Carol, believes. But Carol is convinced that their new island home—Willowbrook Manor on the Puget Sound—is just the thing to cheer her husband up. And so begins a whirlwind summer as their house becomes the epicenter of multiple social dramas involving the family, their friends, and a host of new acquaintances.

The Widdicombes’ son, Christopher, mourns a heartbreak after a year abroad in Italy. Their personal assistant, Michelle, begins a romance with preppy screenwriter Bradford. Meanwhile, a local named Marvelous Matthews is hired to create a garden at the manor—and is elated to find Gracie Sloane, bewitching self-help author, in residence as well. When this alternately bumbling and clever cast of characters comes together, Willowbrook transforms into a circus of uncovered secrets, preposterous misunderstandings, and irrepressible passions.


Evan James is an award-winning writer whose personal essays and fiction have appeared in such publications as the Oxford American, Travel + Leisure, and The New York Times, among others. He received an MFA in Fiction from the Iowa Writers’ Workshop and has received fellowships from Yaddo, Virginia Center for the Creative Arts, The Carson McCullers Center, The Elizabeth Kostova Foundation, The University of Iowa, and the Lambda Literary Writers’ Retreat, where he was a 2017 Emerging LGBTQ Voices Fellow. He has taught at The University of Iowa, The Iowa Young Writers’ Studio, and Victoria University of Wellington in New Zealand. Born in Seattle, he now lives in New York and teaches creative writing and English at Pierrepont School in Westport, Connecticut.

Wednesday, May 1, 7:00pm Magers And Quinn Booksellers (map)

Heidi Barr presents What Comes Next

Job loss.  It’s not something that most people want to think about, whether it happens to them or not – but in modern society, it’s all too common for the words “lay off” and “company downsize” to grace a conversation about how life is going.  Through an honest look at the emotions, feelings, and everyday challenges that can come with losing a job, author Heidi Barr illustrates what going through such an event is like. From disbelief to financial concerns to anxiety over the prospect of a two hour commute after ten years of working from home, this essay explores the uncertainty of not knowing what might be coming next, along with the potential for uncovering the beauty that might just be hidden under what feels like destruction.

Heidi Barr lives in Minnesota with her husband and daughter where they tend a large organic vegetable garden, explore nature and do their best to live simply.  As a mother, spouse, gardener, and wellness coach, she is committed to cultivating ways of being that are life-giving and sustainable for people, communities and the planet. Visit her at heidibarr.com.