Upcoming Events

Wednesday, November 14, 7:00pm Magers And Quinn Booksellers (map)

Allen Eskens presents The Shadows We Hide

Purchase the book (available November 13, 2018)

Joe Talbert, Jr. has never once met his namesake. Now out of college, a cub reporter for the Associated Press in Minneapolis, he stumbles across a story describing the murder of a man named Joseph Talbert in a small town in southern Minnesota. Full of childhood dreams about who his father might have been, Joe is shocked to find that none of the town's residents have much to say about his father's murder-other than that it was long overdue. Joe discovers that his father was a loathsome man who cheated his neighbors, threatened his daughter, and squandered his wife's inheritance after she, too, passed away--an inheritance that may now be his.

Mired in uncertainty and plagued by his own tenuous relationship with his mother, whose sobriety has led her to seek reconciliation with her distant son, Joe must put together the missing pieces of his family history-- before his quest for discovery threatens to put him in a grave of his own.


Allen Eskens is the USA Today bestselling author of The Life We Bury, The Guise of Another, The Heavens May Fall, and The Deep Dark Descending. He is the recipient of the Barry Award, the Rosebud Award, and the Silver Falchion Award, and has been a finalist for the Edgar Award, the Thriller Award, the Anthony Award, and the Minnesota Book Award. His debut novel, The Life We Bury, has been published in 16 languages and is being developed for a feature film.

Thursday, November 15, 7:00pm Magers And Quinn Booksellers (map)

May Yang presents Leaving Laos, with Pang Yang

Through the ups and downs of life, whom do you count on the most?

Twelve-year-old Blong does not have much, but he has his older sister Ka-Ying. Now, their world is suddenly and forever changed. Homes are abandoned. People disappear overnight. Any new friendship is temporary.

The year is 1975, and South Vietnam has fallen to North Vietnam. The Vietnam War is finally over. In the neighboring country of Laos, the Royal Lao Army is defeated by the Communist Pathet Lao. That civil war, too, ends. American soldiers who were fighting in the Secret War in Laos are returning home to America. The Hmong, who were recruited by the CIA to fight in the Secret War, are now going to be persecuted and punished for helping the Americans.

Blong, his sister, and their grandparents must find a way to escape from Laos. The Communist Pathet Lao is celebrating their victory, but already there are rumors of retribution against the Hmong.


May Yang is a Hmong American high school English teacher and taught for 19 years in both Minnesota and Florida. She took a one year break from teaching and worked in educational test and survey administration and processing. It was during this break that May wrote her first novel, Leaving Laos. As an educator, she noticed the lack of diversity with regard to young adult novels, and it never sat well with her. This was one of the many reasons she was so passionate about publishing a book for this genre. 

Pang Yang is a graduate of St. Paul Public Schools, a lifelong educator, and a mother of 7 children. She works to preserve the Hmong language, culture, and history in her Hmong for Native Speakers World Language courses and her community.  Amplifying student voices through published books is one way to she helps tell authentic stories from the heart.

Sunday, November 18, 5:00pm Magers And Quinn Booksellers (map)

Dorothy Van Soest launches Death, Unchartered

When a child’s skeleton is discovered during the excavation of the site for a new charter school being built in the Bronx, former teacher Sylvia Jensen is certain of only two things. She is sure that the remains are those of eight-year-old Markus LeMeur, her third-grade student who disappeared in the violent and tumultuous fall of 1968. And she is sure that his death was no accident. Determined to find out who killed Markus and why, Sylvia again joins forces with investigative reporter J. B. Harrell and together they delve into the strikes and political protests of the late 1960s and corporate greed of the present. As Sylvia fights to make peace with her own past, she realizes that she missed her chance to save Markus, and she becomes driven to find his killer, before he can kill again.


Novelist Dorothy Van Soest, professor emerita and retired dean at the University of Washington, holds a B.A. in English Literature and a Masters and Ph.D. in Social Work. Death, Unchartered, the second of her Sylvia Jensen mysteries, is grounded in her career as an educator that spanned the teaching of high school English, elementary and preschool, undergraduate and graduate courses at the university levels. dorothyvansoest.com

Sunday, November 18, 7:00pm Magers And Quinn Booksellers (map)

Mill City Reading Series

The Mill City Reading Series is a monthly showcase of works in progress by MFA in Creative Writing students at the University of Minnesota. This reading series is free and open to the public.

Monday, November 19, 7:00pm Magers And Quinn Booksellers (map)

Thomas Peacock presents Beginnings: The Homeward Journey of Donovan Manypenny

In this compelling, lyrical novel, Ojibwe character Donovan Manypenny reconnects with his lost cultural roots and language by retracing the long ago migration of his tribal ancestors.

Raised by his grandparents on a northern Wisconsin Ojibwe reservation until their passing when he is ten years old, Manypenny becomes a ward of the state of Wisconsin and enters the child welfare system— foster care, children’s home, and adoption. The trauma he experiences as a result of losing his grandparents and way of life leads him to put his past behind him for over forty- three years. Then, at the age of fifty-three, events in his life take him back to his childhood home, retracing the historical westward migration of his Ojibwe ancestors.

Heartfelt and bittersweet, and layered with meaning, Beginnings: The Homeward Journey of Donovan Manypenny will resonate with anyone who longs to make the journey home, wherever that may be, as well those who seek or have experienced cultural or spiritual awakening, and healing.


Thomas D. Peacock is a member of the Fond du Lac Band of Lake Superior (Anishinaabe Ojibwe). Several of his books (Ojibwe Waasa Inaabida, The Good Path) were Minnesota Book Award winners. The Seventh Generation won a national Multicultural Children’s Book of the Year award. Other books include A Forever Story, Collected Wisdom, The Four Hills of Life, and To Be Free. An illustrated children’s book, The Forever Sky, will be released in 2018. He lives with his wife, Betsy, in Little Sand Bay, Red Cliff, Wisconsin, and Duluth, Minnesota.

Monday, November 26, 7:00pm Magers And Quinn Booksellers (map)

Peter Sagal presents The Incomplete Book of Running

Peter Sagal, the host of NPR’s Wait Wait...Don’t Tell Me! and a popular columnist for Runner’s World, shares lessons, stories, advice, and warnings gleaned from running the equivalent of once around the earth.

At the verge of turning forty, Peter Sagal—brainiac Harvard grad, short bald Jew with a disposition towards heft, and a sedentary star of public radio—started running seriously. And much to his own surprise, he kept going, faster and further, running fourteen marathons and logging tens of thousands of miles on roads, sidewalks, paths, and trails all over the United States and the world, including the 2013 Boston Marathon, where he crossed the finish line moments before the bombings.

In this new book, Sagal reflects on the trails, tracks, and routes he’s traveled, from the humorous absurdity of running charity races in his underwear—in St. Louis, in February—or attempting to “quiet his colon” on runs around his neighborhood—to the experience of running as a guide to visually impaired runners, and the triumphant post-bombing running of the Boston Marathon in 2014. With humor and humanity, Sagal also writes about the emotional experience of running, body image, the similarities between endurance sports and sadomasochism, the legacy of running as passed down from parent to child, and the odd but extraordinary bonds created between strangers and friends. The result is a funny, wise, and powerful meditation about running and life that will appeal to readers everywhere.


Peter Sagal is the host of the Peabody Award-winning NPR news quiz Wait Wait...Don’t Tell Me!, the most popular show on public radio, heard by five million listeners each week. He is also a playwright, a screenwriter, the host of Constitution USA with Peter Sagal on PBS, a one-time extra in a Michael Jackson music video, a contributor to publications from Opera News to The Magazine of the AARP and a featured columnist in Runner’s World. He’s run fourteen marathons across the United States. Sagal lives near Chicago with his wife Mara.