Etymology and Slang
Heavens to Betsy! and Other Curious Sayings
Heavens to Betsy! and Other Curious Sayings
Paperback      ISBN: 0062720112
Provides the historical and literary background of over four-hundred unusual terms and expressions
The Highly Selective Dictionary for the Extraordinarily Literate
The Highly Selective Dictionary for the Extraordinarily Literate
Hardcover      ISBN: 0062701908
Profiles over 3,500 interesting words, featuring concise definitions and discussions of their use and misuse in modern language
Hip Hoptionary: The Dictionary of Hip Hop Terminology
Hip Hoptionary
The Dictionary of Hip Hop Terminology
Paperback      ISBN: 0767909240
A celebration of hip-hop music and its role as a means of creative self-expression presents a lexicon of idioms, words, phrases, and more, along with lists of hip-hop fashion labels, books, and concise biographical profiles of America's famed rappers. Reprint.

How the Irish Invented Slang: The Secret Language of the Crossroads
How the Irish Invented Slang
The Secret Language of the Crossroads
Paperback      ISBN: 1904859607
Cassidy reveals how the Gaelic of Irish immigrants to North America has infiltrated into slang and other informal and non-elite realms of English. Among the words he traces to Irish are slum, dude, and rookie. Annotation ©2008 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
How to Speak Brit: The Quintessential Guide to the King's English, Cockney Slang, and Other Flummoxing British Phrases
How to Speak Brit
The Quintessential Guide to the King's English, Cockney Slang, and Other Flummoxing British Phrases
Hardcover      ISBN: 1592408982
The quintessential A to Z guide to British English?perfect for every egghead and bluestocking looking to conquer the language barrier Oscar Wilde once said the Brits have "everything in common with America nowadays except, of course, language." Any visitor to Old Blighty can sympathize with Mr. Wilde. After all, even fluent English speakers can be at sixes and sevens when told to pick up the "dog and bone" or "head to the loo," so they can "spend a penny." Wherever did these peculiar expressions come from? British author Christopher J. Moore made a name for himself on this side of the pond with the sleeper success of his previous book, In Other Words. Now, Moore draws on history, literature, pop culture, and his own heritage to explore the phrases that most embody the British character. He traces the linguistic influence of writers from Chaucer to Shakespeare and Dickens to Wodehouse, and unravels the complexity Brits manage to imbue in seemingly innocuous phrases like "All right." Along the way, Moore reveals the uniquely British origins of some of the English language’s more curious sayings. For example: Who is Bob and how did he become your uncle? Why do we refer to powerless politicians as ?lame ducks
I Love It When You Talk Retro: Hoochie Coochie, Double Whammy, Drop a Dime, and the Forgotten Origins of American Speech
I Love It When You Talk Retro
Hoochie Coochie, Double Whammy, Drop a Dime, and the Forgotten Origins of American Speech
1st Edition    Paperback      ISBN: 0312606400
Today’s eighteen-year-olds may not know who Mrs. Robinson is, the size of a breadbox, or why going postal refers to a major uproar. Such “retroterms” are words or phrases whose origin lies in our past. I Love It When You Talk Retro discusses these verbal fossils that linger in our national conversation long after the topic they refer to has galloped into the sunset. That could be a person (Charles Ponzi), product (Edsel), radio show (Gang Busters), or ad slogan (“Cha-ching!”). How many realize that cooties was World War I slang for lice, or that doofus came from the comic strip Popeye? Ralph Keyes takes us on an illuminating and engaging tour through what he calls retrotalk. This journey along the highways of history and byways of cultureis an invaluable handbook for anyone who’s ever wondered about an obscure word or phrase, “I wonder where that came from?” Ralph Keyes’s book answers that question. Repeatedly. And is a lot of fun to read.
Informal English: Puncture Ladies, Egg Harbors, Mississippi Marbles, And Other Curious Words And Phrases Of North America
Informal English
Puncture Ladies, Egg Harbors, Mississippi Marbles, And Other Curious Words And Phrases Of North America
Paperback      ISBN: 0743254937
A wide-reaching treasury of some 2,500 English-language colloquialisms from the past and present is culled from dictionaries, etymological treatises, historical writings, and other sources, in a volume that features such entries as "bone-orchard" and "chawswizzled." Original. 35,000 first printing.
Keywords: A Vocabulary of Culture and Society
Keywords
A Vocabulary of Culture and Society
Paperback      ISBN: 0195204697
Details the histories of one hundred-fifty-five words that have acquired cultural and social significance, noting specific meanings, extent and intensity of uses, and related issues and contexts
The Logodaedalian's Dictionary of Interesting and Unusual Words
The Logodaedalian's Dictionary of Interesting and Unusual Words
Paperback      ISBN: 087249683x
Lists the meaning of difficult and obscure English words, and offers examples of their use from the works of top British and American writers
Lost in Translation: An Illustrated Compendium of Untranslatable Words from Around the World
Lost in Translation
An Illustrated Compendium of Untranslatable Words from Around the World
Hardcover      ISBN: 1607747103
"An artistic collection of 50 drawings featuring unique, funny, and poignant foreign words that have no direct translation into English. Did you know that the Japanese have a word to express the way sunlight filters through the leaves of trees? Or that there's a Swedish word to describe the reflection of the moon across the water? The nuanced beauty of language is even more interesting and relevant in our highly communicative, globalized modern world. Lost in Translation brings this wonder to life with 50 ink illustrations featuring the foreign word, the language of origin, and a pithy definition. The words and definitions range from the lovely, such as goya, the Urdu word to describe the transporting suspension of belief that can occur in good storytelling, to the funny, like the Hawaiian pana po'o, which describes the act of scratching your head to remember something you've forgotten. Each beautiful, simple illustration adds just the right amount of visual intrigue to anchor the words and their meanings"--