Etymology and Slang
Endangered Phrases: Intriguing Idioms Dangerously Close to Extinction
Endangered Phrases
Intriguing Idioms Dangerously Close to Extinction
Paperback      ISBN: 161608247x
Collects phrases that were once part of everyday speech, but no longer are due to the evolution of language and cultural changes.
English As a Second F*Cking Language
English As a Second F*Cking Language
Paperback      ISBN: 031214329x
Demonstrates swearing for those learning English as a second language, and explains the meaning of obscene, off-color, and vulgar expressions
The Etymologicon: A Circular Stroll Through the Hidden Connections of the English Language
The Etymologicon
A Circular Stroll Through the Hidden Connections of the English Language
Paperback      ISBN: 0425260798
The writer behind the popular and humorous blog Inky Fool explores the interesting and surprising connections between words in the English language, including how one can go from being “gruntled
Every Good Boy Deserves Fudge: The Book of Mnemonic Devices
Every Good Boy Deserves Fudge
The Book of Mnemonic Devices
Paperback      ISBN: 0399533516
An entertaining and helpful manual introduces hundreds of key mnemonic devices designed to help readers recall important facts about science, spelling, world history, music, literature, sports, religion, and many other fields of interest. Original.
Everything Explained That Is Explainable: On the Creation of the Encyclopaedia Britannica's Celebrated Eleventh Edition, 1910-1911
Everything Explained That Is Explainable
On the Creation of the Encyclopaedia Britannica's Celebrated Eleventh Edition, 1910-1911
Hardcover      ISBN: 0307269175
"The audacious, improbable tale of 20th century American hucksterism, outlandish daring, and vision that resurrected a dying Encyclopedia Britannica in collaboration with a floundering London Times, its astonishing success that changed publishing and that produced the Britannica's eleventh edition (published between 1910 and 1911), the most revered edition of English-language encyclopedias (all 44 million words), considered by many to be "the last great work of the age of reason" (Hans Koening, the New Yorker)"--
Exaltation of Larks: Or, The Venereal Game
Exaltation of Larks
Or, The Venereal Game
Hardcover      SKU: 1199325775
An Exaltation of Larks: The Ultimate Edition
An Exaltation of Larks
The Ultimate Edition
Paperback      ISBN: 0140170960
An "exaltation of larks"? Yes! And a "leap of leopards," a "parliament of owls," an "ostentation of peacocks," a "smack of jellyfish," and a "murder of crows"! For those who have ever wondered if the familiar "pride of lions" and "gaggle of geese" were only the tip of a linguistic iceberg, James Lipton has provided the definitive answer: here are hundreds of equally pithy, and often poetic, terms unearthed by Mr. Lipton in the Books of Venery that were the constant study of anyone who aspired to the title of gentleman in the fifteenth century. When Mr. Lipton's painstaking research revealed that five hundred years ago the terms of venery had already been turned into the Game of Venery, he embarked on an odyssey that has given us a "slouch of models," a "shrivel of critics," an "unction of undertakers," a "blur of Impressionists," a "score of bachelors," and a "pocket of quarterbacks." This ultimate edition of An Exaltation of Larks is Mr. Lipton's brilliant answer to the assault on language and literacy in the last decades of the twentieth century. In it you will find more than 1,100 resurrected or newly minted contributions to that most endangered of all species, our language, in a setting of 250 witty, beautiful, and remarkably apt engravings.
The F-Word
The F-Word
Hardcover      ISBN: 0195393112
We all know what frak, popularized by television's cult hit Battlestar Galactica, really means. But what about feck? Or ferkin? Or foul--as in FUBAR, or "Fouled Up Beyond All Recognition"? In a thoroughly updated edition of The F-Word, Jesse Sheidlower offers a rich, revealing look at the f-bomb and its illimitable uses. Since the fifteenth century, no other word has been adapted, interpreted, euphemized, censored, and shouted with as much ardor or force; imagine Dick Cheney telling Democratic Senator Patrick Leahy to "go damn himself" on the Senate floor--it doesn't have quite the same impact as what was really said. Sheidlower cites this and other notorious examples throughout history, from the satiric sixteenth-century poetry of James Cranstoun to the bawdy parodies of Lord Rochester in the seventeenth century, to more recent uses by Ernest Hemingway, Jack Kerouac, Ann Sexton, Norman Mailer, Liz Phair, Anthony Bourdain, Junot Diaz, Jenna Jameson, Amy Winehouse, Jon Stewart, and Bono (whose use of the word at the Grammys nearly got him fined by the FCC). Collectively, these references and the more than one hundred new entries they illustrate double the size of The F-Word since its previous edition. Thousands of added quotations come from newly available electronic databases and the resources of the OED, expanding the range of quotations to cover British, Canadian, Australian, New Zealand, Irish, and South African uses in addition to American ones. Thus we learn why a fugly must hone his or her sense of humor, why Canadian Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau muttered "fuddle duddle" in the Commons, and why Fanny Adams is so sweet. A fascinating introductory essay explores the word's history, reputation, and changing popularity over time. and a new Foreword by comedian, actor, and author Lewis Black offers readers a smart and entertaining take on the book and its subject matter. Oxford dictionaries have won renown for their expansive, historical approach to words and their etymologies. The F-Word offers all that and more in an entertaining and informative look at a word that, while now largely accepted as an integral part of the English language, still confounds, provokes, and scandalizes.
Figures of Speech: Sixty Ways to Turn a Phrase
Figures of Speech
Sixty Ways to Turn a Phrase
Paperback      ISBN: 1880393026
Writing is not like chemical engineering. The figures of speech should not be learned the same way as the periodic table of elements. This is because figures of speech are not about hypothetical structures in things, but about real potentialities within language and within ourselves. The "figurings" of speech reveal the apparently limitless plasticity of language itself. We are inescapably confronted with the intoxicating possibility that we can make language do for us almost anything we want. Or at least a Shakespeare can. The figures of speech help to see how he does it, and how we might. Therefore, in the chapters presented in this volume, the quotations from Shakespeare, the Bible, and other sources are not presented to exemplify the definitions. Rather, the definitions are presented to lead to the quotations. And the quotations are there to show us how to do with language what we have not done before. They are there for imitation.
Forgotten English
Forgotten English
Paperback      ISBN: 0688166369
Lists and explicates hundreds of archaic words no longer actively in use in English, with notes on usage and derivation