Great Lakes
19th Century Baseball in Chicago
19th Century Baseball in Chicago
Paperback      ISBN: 0738531812

The Chicago area today hosts two of the most historic major league franchises and half a dozen minor or independent league teams. Baseball's roots run deep in the Windy City. Indeed, it was Chicago businessman William "I'd rather be a lamp-post in Chicago than a millionaire in any other city" Hulbert, who, according to baseball lore, staged the coup that in 1876 would put the National League on the map. The Chicago White Stockings (now ironically called the Cubs) were one of eight charter members, winning the inaugural NL Championship with such legendary names as A.G. Spalding, "Cap" Anson, and Roscoe Barnes.

But The National Pastime arrived in Chicago well before the 1876 season, as is proven in this fascinating new book, 19th Century Baseball in Chicago, illustrated with over 150 vintage images.Any local fan of the modern game-whether the action takes place at the "Friendly Confines," 35th & Shields, or the cozy setting of a minor league ballpark out in Kane or suburban Cook County-will enjoy the wealth of information offered in 19th Century Baseball in Chicago.

29 Missing: The True and Tragic Story of the Disappearance of the SS Edmund Fitzgerald
29 Missing
The True and Tragic Story of the Disappearance of the SS Edmund Fitzgerald
Paperback      ISBN: 0870134469

On November 10, 1975, SS Edmund Fitzgerald, a giant freighter, sank with its entire crew of 29 aboard, in one of the most violent storms ever witnessed on Lake Superior. In 29 Missing, Kantar tells the "Fitz's" story from the christening in 1958 as the largest ship on the Great Lakes to the expedition in 1995 to recover the ship's bell in what proved to be a moving memorial to the lost crew. Using information from government investigative reports, the book provides a dramatic hour-by-hour account of what transpired during that terrible voyage, including dialogue from actual radio transmissions between the Fitzgerald and the Arthur Anderson, the freighter that followed behind the Fitz.
In his passionate retelling of the story, designed primarily for young adults, Kantar provides the facts leading up to the disappearance, detailing the subsequent expeditions to the wreck site as well as the leading theories about the sinking that have been debated by maritime experts.

63 Alfred Street: Where Capitalism Failed: The Life and Times of a Venetian Gothic Mansion in Downtown Detroit
63 Alfred Street: Where Capitalism Failed
The Life and Times of a Venetian Gothic Mansion in Downtown Detroit
Paperback      ISBN: 1452874956

In downtown Detroit there exists a grand residence built in the Venetian Gothic style some 130 years ago. It stands now in ruins seemingly more comfortable in the company of a lonely castle in the Scottish Highlands than in the shadow of Ford Field (Detroit Lions), Comerica Park (Detroit Tigers), and Joe Louis Arena (Detroit Red Wings). Though its only occupants for the last 40 years have been crack dealers and the local homeless population, its history reflects the length and breadth of the American Experience. This is its Story

An American Hometown: Terre Haute, Indiana, 1927
An American Hometown
Terre Haute, Indiana, 1927
Paperback      ISBN: 0253221293

They lived green out of necessity--walking to work, repairing everything from worn shoes to wristwatches, recycling milk bottles and packing containers. Music was largely heard live and most residential streets had shade trees. The nearby Wabash River--a repeated subject of story and song--transported Sunday picnickers to public parks. In the form of an old-fashioned city directory, An American Hometown celebrates a bygone American era, focusing on life in 1920s Terre Haute, Indiana. With artfully drawn biographical sketches and generously illustrated histories, noted musician, historian, and storyteller Tom Roznowski not only evokes a beauty worth remembering, but also brings to light just how many of our modern ideas of sustainable living are deeply rooted in the American tradition.

An American Summer: Love and Death in Chicago
An American Summer
Love and Death in Chicago
Hardcover      ISBN: 0385538804
2020 J. ANTHONY LUKAS PRIZE WINNER

From the bestselling author of There Are No Children Here, a richly textured, heartrending portrait of love and death in Chicago's most turbulent neighborhoods.

The numbers are staggering: over the past twenty years in Chicago, 14,033 people have been killed and another roughly 60,000 wounded by gunfire. What does that do to the spirit of individuals and community? Drawing on his decades of experience, Alex Kotlowitz set out to chronicle one summer in the city, writing about individuals who have emerged from the violence and whose stories capture the capacity--and the breaking point--of the human heart and soul. The result is a spellbinding collection of deeply intimate profiles that upend what we think we know about gun violence in America. Among others, we meet a man who as a teenager killed a rival gang member and twenty years later is still trying to come to terms with what he's done; a devoted school social worker struggling with her favorite student, who refuses to give evidence in the shooting death of his best friend; the witness to a wrongful police shooting who can't shake what he has seen; and an aging former gang leader who builds a place of refuge for himself and his friends.
Applying the close-up, empathic reporting that made There Are No Children Here a modern classic, Kotlowitz offers a piercingly honest portrait of a city in turmoil. These sketches of those left standing will get into your bones. This one summer will stay with you.
The Angel and the Serpent: The Story of New Harmony
The Angel and the Serpent
The Story of New Harmony
Paperback      ISBN: 0253203260

The Angel and the Serpent is a book which combines scholarship and literary grace, and which recreates for us both the world of the Rappites and the Owenites. --Henry Steele Commager, The New York Times Book Review

Here is the story of George Rapp's German Harmonists and Robert Owen's Idealists--the two vastly different communities that shaped the history of New Harmony, Indiana Both the Rappites and the Owenites came to New Harmony to conduct communal living experiments--Rapp expecting the millennium; Owen believing he had brought the millennium with him.

Bartlett: Our Past and Our Progress
Bartlett
Our Past and Our Progress
Paperback      ISBN: 0738523283

The Village of Bartlett got its official start on February 11, 1891 when the petition for incorporation was filed in Springfield, Illinois. Beginning with the fledgling Village that existed at the turn of the century and continuing through Bartlett's coming of age in the mid-1960s, Bartlett: Our Past and Our Progress chronicles the emergence of a community that has grown to epitomize the all-American town. This historical walk through Bartlett includes more than 200 images that portray many of the area's important firsts, as well as its ongoing traditions. It features photographs of significant local landmarks such as the first train depot, Immanuel United Church of Christ, Bartlett Grade School, and most importantly, many wonderful pictures of its residents--past and present. Residents have generously shared their photos and recollections with the Bartlett History Museum in order to tell the story of their hometown.

Big City Boss in Depression and War: Mayor Edward J. Kelly of Chicago
Big City Boss in Depression and War
Mayor Edward J. Kelly of Chicago
Hardcover      ISBN: 087580098x

The first full-length biography of Edward J. Kelly tells the vivid story of the rough-hewn politician who became one of Chicago's most powerful mayors. With the help of Pat Nash, Mayor Kelly built the Democratic Machine of which Richard J. Daley was to be a chief beneficiary. An enterprising political strategist, Kelly amassed a concentration of political power by drawing traditionally Republican black voters into the Democratic fold, allying the Machine with New Deal policies, and tapping the resources of organized crime.

Black Baseball in Detroit
Black Baseball in Detroit
Paperback      ISBN: 0738507075

When the Negro National League was formed in Kansas City in 1920, a new chapter in sports history, indeed in American history, began to be written.
Whistle Stop: Black Baseball in Detroit chronicles the history of the various teams and players that spent time in the "Motor City." From the aftermath of the First World War, through the Jazz Age and Prohibition, the Great Depression, and through the 1950s, the history of the Negro Leagues parallels the history of Black America, from segregation to full inclusion. With the hiring of pioneers like Jackie Robinson by the major leagues came the end of the Negro Leagues, and the end of an era. You will meet the players--"Ghost" Marcell, "Cool Papa" Bell, "Bingo" DeMoss, and the great Norman "Turkey" Stearnes--who made this sport a vibrant and exciting part of the American landscape.

Black Detroit: A People's History of Self-Determination
Black Detroit
A People's History of Self-Determination
Paperback      ISBN: 0062346636

NAACP 2017 Image Award Finalist

2018 Michigan Notable Books honoree

The author of Baldwin's Harlem looks at the evolving culture, politics, economics, and spiritual life of Detroit--a blend of memoir, love letter, history, and clear-eyed reportage that explores the city's past, present, and future and its significance to the African American legacy and the nation's fabric.

Herb Boyd moved to Detroit in 1943, as race riots were engulfing the city. Though he did not grasp their full significance at the time, this critical moment would be one of many he witnessed that would mold his political activism and exposed a city restless for change. In Black Detroit, he reflects on his life and this landmark place, in search of understanding why Detroit is a special place for black people.

Boyd reveals how Black Detroiters were prominent in the city's historic, groundbreaking union movement and--when given an opportunity--were among the tireless workers who made the automobile industry the center of American industry. Well paying jobs on assembly lines allowed working class Black Detroiters to ascend to the middle class and achieve financial stability, an accomplishment not often attainable in other industries.

Boyd makes clear that while many of these middle-class jobs have disappeared, decimating the population and hitting blacks hardest, Detroit survives thanks to the emergence of companies such as Shinola--which represent the strength of the Motor City and and its continued importance to the country. He also brings into focus the major figures who have defined and shaped Detroit, including William Lambert, the great abolitionist, Berry Gordy, the founder of Motown, Coleman Young, the city's first black mayor, diva songstress Aretha Franklin, Malcolm X, and Ralphe Bunche, winner of the Nobel Peace Prize.

With a stunning eye for detail and passion for Detroit, Boyd celebrates the music, manufacturing, politics, and culture that make it an American original.