South
1 Dead in Attic: After Katrina
1 Dead in Attic
After Katrina
Paperback      ISBN: 1501125370

With a new foreword by the author on the tenth anniversary of Hurricane Katrina--Chris Rose's New York Times bestselling collection: "A gripping book about life's challenges in post-Katrina New Orleans...packed with heart, honesty, and wit" (New Republic).

Celebrated as a local classic and heaped with national praise, 1 Dead in Attic is a brilliant collection of columns by an award-winning Times-Picayune journalist chronicling the horrific damage and aftermath wrought by Hurricane Katrina in 2006. "Frank and compelling...vivid and invaluable" (Booklist), it is a roller coaster ride through a devastated American wasteland as it groans for rebirth. Full of the emotion, tragedy and even humor--which has made Chris Rose a favorite son and the voice of a lost city--these are the stories of the dead and the living, of survivors and believers, of destruction and recovery, and of hope and despair.

With photographs by British photojournalist Charlie Varley, 1 Dead in Attic captures New Orleans caught between an old era and a new, New Orleans in its most desperate time, as it struggled out of floodwaters and willed itself back to life.
1 Dead in Attic: After Katrina
1 Dead in Attic
After Katrina
Paperback      ISBN: 1416552987

Originally a self-published sensation by a Pulitzer Prize-winning author, 1 Dead in Attic captures the heart and soul of New Orleans in the immediate aftermath of Hurricane Katrina.

1 Dead in Attic is a collection of stories by Times-Picayune columnist Chris Rose, recounting the first harrowing year and a half of life in New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina. Celebrated as a local treasure and heaped with national praise, Rose provides a rollercoaster ride of observation, commentary, emotion, tragedy, and even humor--in a way that only he could find in a devastated wasteland.

They are stories of the dead and the living, stories of survivors and believers, stories of hope and despair. And stories about refrigerators.

1 Dead in Attic freeze-frames New Orleans, caught between an old era and a new, during its most desperate time, as it struggles out of the floodwaters and wills itself back to life.
101 Glimpses of Nags Head
101 Glimpses of Nags Head
Paperback      ISBN: 1596296070

Nags Head boasts a plethora of natural wonders. From an ecologically unique maritime forest to breathtaking coastal dunes, the dynamics of the area corroborate the sentiment Thomas Nixon expressed in his 1964 classic. Indeed, as early as the 1830s, merchants and planters from the Albemarle region of North Carolina and Southside Virginia brought their families to Nags Head via boat to exchange the oppressive inland summer heat for cool ocean breezes. In this striking photographic collection, Downing illustrates why this scenic spot on the Outer Banks has been beloved for generations by sun-seekers, sightseers and surfers alike.

12 Rounds in Lo's Gym: Boxing and Manhood in Appalachia
12 Rounds in Lo's Gym
Boxing and Manhood in Appalachia
Paperback      ISBN: 1946684120

Questions of class and gender in Appalachia have, in the wake of the 2016 presidential election and the runaway success of Hillbilly Elegy, moved to the forefront of national conversations about politics and culture. From Todd Snyder, a first generation college student turned college professor, comes a passionate commentary on these themes in a family memoir set in West Virginia coal country.
12 Rounds in Lo's Gym is the story of the author's father, Mike "Lo" Snyder, a fifth generation West Virginia coal miner who opened a series of makeshift boxing gyms with the goal of providing local at-risk youth with the opportunities that eluded his adolescence. Taking these hardscrabble stories as his starting point, Snyder interweaves a history of the region, offering a smart analysis of the costs--both financial and cultural--of an economy built around extractive industries.

Part love letter to Appalachia, part rigorous social critique, readers may find 12 Rounds in Lo's Gym--and its narrative of individual and community strength in the face of globalism's headwinds--a welcome corrective to popular narratives that blame those in the region for their troubles.

The 1868 St. Bernard Parish Massacre: Blood in the Cane Fields
The 1868 St. Bernard Parish Massacre
Blood in the Cane Fields
Paperback      ISBN: 1625858558

Author and historian Chris Dier reveals the horrifying true story behind the St. Bernard Parish Massacre.


As African American men gained the right to vote, white Democrats of St. Bernard Parish feared losing their majority. Armed groups mobilized to suppress these recently emancipated voters in the hopes of regaining a way of life turned upside down by the Civil War and Reconstruction. Days before the tumultuous presidential election of 1868, the parish descended into chaos. Freedpeople were dragged from their homes and murdered in cold blood. Many fled to the cane fields to hide from their attackers. The reported number of those killed varies from 35 to 135. The tragedy was hidden, but implications reverberated throughout the South and lingered for generations.

1968 Farmington Mine Disaster
1968 Farmington Mine Disaster
Paperback      ISBN: 1467123781

Coal in the United States was discovered in the 18th century by landowners and farmers on the slopes of the hillsides in the Appalachian region. It was not until the late 19th century that this black rock would become a part of an industrial revolution. One of the first mines to commercially produce coal was in Fairmont, West Virginia, and began the Consolidated Coal Corporation. On November 20, 1968, the Farmington No. 9 mine explosion changed the course of safety for future mining and the lives of 78 families whose sons, husbands, fathers, and loved ones never came back from the cateye shift the next day.

25 Years of Limestone College Men's Lacrosse
25 Years of Limestone College Men's Lacrosse
Paperback      ISBN: 1467124699

One of the most successful programs at any level of collegiate athletics, Limestone College lacrosse began its legacy in Gaffney, South Carolina, in 1990 and has since built a tradition and reputation unique to all others. The four-time NCAA Division II National Champions paved the way for the sport of lacrosse in the state of South Carolina, as well as much of the southern United States. The first southern program in the sport's history, Limestone quickly fought off the stigma that it would not be able to compete, becoming a top contender even in the program's infancy. Just 10 years after its inaugural season, the Saints broke through with the most coveted prize of all--a national championship. Since then, Limestone has added three more crowns and has appeared in the championship round 10 times. While the popularity of lacrosse continues to grow in South Carolina and the surrounding area, so too does Limestone's lore. The Saints continue to push forward and will forever remain innovators of the sport's heritage.

A. D.: New Orleans After the Deluge
A. D.
New Orleans After the Deluge
Hardcover      ISBN: 0307378144

"A.D.: New Orleans After the Deluge" is a masterful portrait of a city under siege. Cartoonist Josh Neufeld depicts seven extraordinary true stories of survival in the days leading up to and following Hurricane Katrina.
Here we meet Denise, a counselor and social worker, and a sixth-generation New Orleanian; "The Doctor," a proud fixture of the French Quarter; Abbas and Darnell, two friends who face the storm from Abbas's family-run market; Kwame, a pastor's son just entering his senior year of high school; and the young couple Leo and Michelle, who both grew up in the city. Each is forced to confront the same wrenching decision-whether to stay or to flee.
As beautiful as it is poignant, "A.D." presents a city in chaos and shines a bright, profoundly human light on the tragedies and triumphs that took place within it.

Abingdon
Abingdon
Paperback      ISBN: 1467124656

According to legend, in about 1760, Daniel Boone first named this hinterlands settlement "Wolf Hills." Incorporated in 1778, the town of Abingdon became the leading trade, business, and legal center for Southwest Virginia from the late 1700s to mid-1800s. With a key location along the Great Wagon Road, the community blossomed during the 19th and 20th centuries due to trade, railroad commerce, banking, industry, and its natural resources, such as timber and salt from nearby Saltville. However, from the 1960s to 1980s, downtown lost several historic landmarks to fire and demolition. Businesses began to move to outlying shopping centers, and small, locally owned businesses were replaced by national chain stores. Railroad traffic decreased and no longer moved goods and passengers. Previously the locus for commerce, transportation, and entertainment, the historic downtown area transitioned to an arts and tourist destination and to a unique crossroads service area with government centers, restaurants, speciality stores, offices, banks, and hotels.

Abolitionizing Missouri: German Immigrants and Racial Ideology in Nineteenth-Century America
Abolitionizing Missouri
German Immigrants and Racial Ideology in Nineteenth-Century America
Hardcover      ISBN: 0807161969

Historians have long known that German immigrants provided much of the support for emancipation in southern Border States. Kristen Layne Anderson's Abolitionizing Missouri, however, is the first analysis of the reasons behind that opposition as well as the first exploration of the impact that the Civil War and emancipation had on German immigrants' ideas about race. Anderson focuses on the relationships between German immigrants and African Americans in St. Louis, Missouri, looking particularly at the ways in which German attitudes towards African Americans and the institution of slavery changed over time. Anderson suggests that although some German Americans deserved their reputation for racial egalitarianism, many others opposed slavery only when it served their own interests to do so. When slavery did not seem to affect their lives, they ignored it; once it began to threaten the stability of the country or their ability to get land, they opposed it. After slavery ended, most German immigrants accepted the American racial hierarchy enough to enjoy its benefits, and had little interest in helping tear it down, particularly when doing so angered their native-born white neighbors.
Anderson's work counters prevailing interpretations in immigration and ethnic history, where until recently, scholars largely accepted that German immigrants were solidly antislavery. Instead, she uncovers a spectrum of Germans' antislavery positions and explores the array of individual motives driving such diverse responses.. In the end, Anderson demonstrates that Missouri Germans were more willing to undermine the racial hierarchy by questioning slavery than were most white Missourians, although after emancipation, many of them showed little interest in continuing to demolish the hierarchy that benefited them by fighting for black rights.