Upper Midwest
The 1924 Tornado in Lorain & Sandusky: Deadliest in Ohio History
The 1924 Tornado in Lorain & Sandusky
Deadliest in Ohio History
Paperback      ISBN: 1626196362

June 28, 1924, dawned hot and sunny, with fluffy white clouds hovering over a blue and inviting Lake Erie. For two Ohio communities, Lorain and Sandusky, the day ended in unimaginable disaster. In the late afternoon, the blue sky turned dark, and the wispy white puffs morphed into a mass of black thunderclouds as a monster formed on the lake. An F4 tornado, unexpected and not understood, was born from a thunderstorm on the now turbulent waters of Lake Erie. It charged ashore, smashing into Sandusky, retreated again to the lake and then headed east before turning abruptly south to make landfall in Lorain. Before the massive funnel lifted, it would destroy a city, create death records still unbroken and change the lives of thousands of people.

The 1931 Hastings Bank Job & the Bloody Bandit Trail
The 1931 Hastings Bank Job & the Bloody Bandit Trail
Paperback      ISBN: 1609497961

In February 1931, Mr. & Mrs. Robert Hendricks" and three others tied up fourteen employees at the Hastings National Bank and walked away with over $27,000 from the vault. They then returned home to plan a robbery of the First National Bank for the following day. Even though police quickly surrounded the house, the robbers managed to capture all eleven officers on the scene and make a getaway. Retired police lieutenant and historian Monty McCord recounts the crime and the grisly aftermath in the first account of the heist ever to be published."

The 1936-1937 Great Lakes Exposition
The 1936-1937 Great Lakes Exposition
Paperback      ISBN: 1467124133

The Great Lakes Exposition was held in Cleveland during the summers of 1936 and 1937, drawing seven million visitors over its two-year run. The exposition was intended to observe the city's centennial anniversary and to celebrate the Great Lakes Region. It was also hoped that it would help lift the city's economy out of the Great Depression. The exposition boasted a staggering array of ever-changing national-level attractions and feature events. In a single day, exposition visitors could experience the latest technological innovations; see a world-class aquatics show; watch a Shakespearean play; ride in a blimp; and hear the music, taste the food, view the architecture, and experience the culture of 40 of the world's countries.

38 Nooses: Lincoln, Little Crow, and the Beginning of the Frontier's End
38 Nooses
Lincoln, Little Crow, and the Beginning of the Frontier's End
Paperback      ISBN: 0307389138

A Kirkus Reviews Best Book of the Year

In August 1862, after suffering decades of hardship, broken treaties, and relentless encroachment on their land, the Dakota leader Little Crow reluctantly agreed that his people must go to war. After six weeks of fighting, the uprising was smashed, thousands of Indians were taken prisoner by the US army, and 303 Dakotas were sentenced to death. President Lincoln, embroiled in the most devastating period of the Civil War, personally intervened to save the lives of 265 of the condemned men, but in the end, 38 Dakota men would be hanged in the largest government-sanctioned execution in U.S. history.

Writing with uncommon immediacy and insight, Scott W. Berg details these events within the larger context of the Civil War, the history of the Dakota people and the subsequent United States-Indian wars, and brings to life this overlooked but seminal moment in American history.
8 Wonders of Cincinnati
8 Wonders of Cincinnati
Paperback      ISBN: 1625858981

Cincinnati is an amazing place to live and visit for so many reasons. Local author Wendy Beckman and illustrator Allison Ranieri celebrate the city's eight wonders--architecture, art, commerce, food, customs, geography, history and people. With its Venetian Gothic lancet arches and crystal chandeliers, the Cincinnati Music Hall stands as an architectural masterpiece. The Cincinnati Red Stockings made history as the first professional baseball team. Remnants of marine fossils from the Ordovician Period remind residents that the city was once under water. Limitless local varieties of goetta range from family recipes to trendy caf dishes. And the city birthed trailblazers like track and field star DeHart Hubbard, the first African American to win an Olympic gold medal in an individual event. These stories and more reveal the unique character of the Queen City.

900 Miles from Nowhere: Voices from the Homestead Frontier
900 Miles from Nowhere
Voices from the Homestead Frontier
Paperback      ISBN: 1681340690

It was on the vast American prairie that people from around the world seized the opportunity for personal and economic freedom promised by free land. Traveling across oceans and continents, these hard-nosed, pragmatic people began arriving in the 1860s with shovels and plows, convinced they were part of something important. They were. Putting hand to plow and breaking the sod for their first crude homes, these hardy settlers left an indelible thumbprint on American history and on the country's character. Though many of their ventures ended in failure, their risks permanently enhanced the nation's diversity and its sense of independence and resourcefulness.

900 Miles from Nowhere is the heartfelt chronicle of the daily lives and personal struggles of Great Plains homesteaders, told in their own voices through many never-before-published letters, diaries, and photographs. Believing absolutely that they could control their own destiny, they bet everything they owned, even in the face of insurmountable obstacles. This is the remarkable and ever-inspiring story of life on the grasslands that stretch from Canada to Mexico.

9XM Talking: WHA Radio and the Wisconsin Idea
9XM Talking
WHA Radio and the Wisconsin Idea
Paperback      ISBN: 0299218740

Randall Davidson provides a comprehensive history of the innovative work of Wisconsin's educational radio stations. Beginning with the first broadcast by experimental station 9XM at the University of Wisconsin, followed by WHA, through the state-owned affiliate WLBL, to the network of stations that in the years following WWII formed the Wisconsin Public Radio network, Davidson describes how, with homemade equipment and ideas developed from scratch, public radio became a tangible example of the Wisconsin Idea, bringing the educational riches of the university to all the state's residents. Marking the centennial year of Wisconsin Public Radio, this paperback edition includes a new foreword by Bill Siemering, National Public Radio's founding director of programming.

Across the Deep Blue Sea: The Saga of Early Norwegian Immigrants
Across the Deep Blue Sea
The Saga of Early Norwegian Immigrants
Paperback      ISBN: 0873519612

Across the Deep Blue Sea investigates a chapter in Norwegian immigration history that has never been fully told before. Odd S. Lovoll relates how Quebec, Montreal, and other port cities in Canada became the gateway for Norwegian emigrants to North America, replacing New York as the main destination from 1850 until the late 1860s. During those years, 94 percent of Norwegian emigrants landed in Canada.

After the introduction of free trade, Norwegian sailing ships engaged in the lucrative timber trade between Canada and the British Isles. Ships carried timber one way across the Atlantic and emigrants on the way west. For the vast majority landing in Canadian port cities, Canada became a corridor to their final destinations in the Upper Midwest, primarily Wisconsin and Minnesota. Lovoll explains the establishment and failure of Norwegian colonies in Quebec Province and pays due attention to the tragic fate of the Gasp settlement.

A personal story of the emigrant experience passed down as family lore is retold here, supported by extensive research. The journey south and settlement in the Upper Midwest completes a highly human narrative of the travails, endurance, failures, and successes of people who sought a better life in a new land.

Activists in City Hall: The Progressive Response to the Reagan Era in Boston and Chicago
Activists in City Hall
The Progressive Response to the Reagan Era in Boston and Chicago
Paperback      ISBN: 0801476550

In 1983, Boston and Chicago elected progressive mayors with deep roots among community activists. Taking office as the Reagan administration was withdrawing federal aid from local governments, Boston's Raymond Flynn and Chicago's Harold Washington implemented major policies that would outlast them. More than reforming governments, they changed the substance of what the government was trying to do: above all, to effect a measure of redistribution of resources to the cities' poor and working classes and away from hollow goals of growth as measured by the accumulation of skyscrapers. In Boston, Flynn moderated an office development boom while securing millions of dollars for affordable housing. In Chicago, Washington implemented concrete measures to save manufacturing jobs, against the tide of national policy and trends.Activists in City Hall examines how both mayors achieved their objectives by incorporating neighborhood activists as a new organizational force in devising, debating, implementing, and shaping policy. Based in extensive archival research enriched by details and insights gleaned from hours of interviews with key figures in each administration and each city's activist community, Pierre Clavel argues that key to the success of each mayor were numerous factors: productive contacts between city hall and neighborhood activists, strong social bases for their agendas, administrative innovations, and alternative visions of the city. Comparing the experiences of Boston and Chicago with those of other contemporary progressive cities--Hartford, Berkeley, Madison, Santa Cruz, Santa Monica, Burlington, and San Francisco--Activists in City Hall provides a new account of progressive urban politics during the Reagan era and offers many valuable lessons for policymakers, city planners, and progressive political activists.

African American St. Louis
African American St. Louis
Paperback      ISBN: 1467115096

The city of St. Louis is known for its African American citizens and their many contributions to the culture within its borders, the country, and the world. Images of Modern America: African American St. Louis profiles some of the events that helped shape St. Louis from the 1960s to the present. Tracing key milestones in the city's history, this book attempts to pay homage to those African Americans who sacrificed to advance fair socioeconomic conditions for all. In the closing decades of the Great Migration north, the civil rights movement was taking place nationally; simultaneously, St. Louis's African Americans were organizing to exert political power for greater control over their destiny. Protests, voter registration, and elections to public office opened new doors to the city's African Americans. It resulted in the movement for fairness in hiring practices and the expansion of the African American presence in sports, education, and entertainment.