United States History, General
Featured Items
The Mississippi and the Making of a Nation: From the Louisiana Purchase to Today
The Mississippi and the Making of a Nation
From the Louisiana Purchase to Today
Hardcover      ISBN: 0792269136

On a map, the Mississippi River cuts America neatly in half coursing from Minnesota to the Gulf of Mexico and separating East from West. But the Mississippi is in fact the "spine of our nation," says Stephen Ambrose. It knits the nation together and connects the heartland to the world. It is our great natural wonder, a priceless treasure bought for a fledgling America by the visionary Thomas Jefferson just 200 years ago.

Distinguished historians Stephen Ambrose and Douglas Brinkley, with acclaimed National Geographic photographer Sam Abell, explore the length of the Mississippi--from its mouth at Delacroix Island, Louisiana, to its source at Lake Itasca, Minnesota. The result is this lavish, entertaining, engrossing chronicle of the "father of the waters," which has shaped the history, the culture, and the very landscape of America.

Highlighted by Sam Abell's evocative contemporary photographs and wonderful period illustrations, artwork, documents, and maps, this extraordinary panorama of America's heartland offers a lively, informative journey through the history and the landscape carved by the mighty Mississippi.
Walk in Hell (the Great War, Book Two)
Walk in Hell (the Great War, Book Two)
Paperback      ISBN: 0345405625
"Harry Turtledove is] probably the best-known practitioner of alternate history working today."--American Heritage

The year is 1915, and the world is convulsing. Though the Confederacy has defeated its northern enemy twice, this time the United States has allied with the Kaiser. In the South, the freed slaves, fueled by Marxist rhetoric and the bitterness of a racist nation, take up the weapons of the Red rebellion. Despite these advantages, the United States remains pinned between Canada and the Confederate States of America, so the bloody conflict continues and grows. Both presidents--Theodore Roosevelt of the Union and staunch Confederate Woodrow Wilson--are stubbornly determined to lead their nations to victory, at any cost. . .
The Greatest Generation
The Greatest Generation
Hardcover      ISBN: 0375502025

Presents personal narratives from the generation of Americans who were born in the 1920s, came of age during the Depression, fought in World War II, and came home to build a new America during the postwar era.

Mystic Chords of Memory: The Transformation of Tradition in American Culture
Mystic Chords of Memory
The Transformation of Tradition in American Culture
Paperback      ISBN: 0679741771

Mystic Chords of Memory

"Illustrated with hundreds of well-chosen anecdotes and minute observations . . . Kammen is a demon researcher who seems to have mined his nuggets from the entire corpus of American cultural history. . . . Insightful and sardonic."--Washington Post Book World

In this groundbreaking, panoramic work of American cultural history, the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of A Machine That Would Go of Itself examines a central paradox of our national identity. How did "the land of the future" acquire a past? And to what extent has our collective memory of that past--as embodied in our traditions--been distorted, or even manufactured? Ranging from John Adams to Ronald Reagan, from the origins of Independence Day celebrations to the controversies surrounding the Vietnam War Memorial, from the Daughters of the American Revolution to immigrant associations, and filled with incisive analyses of such phenonema as Americana and its collectors, "historic" villages and Disneyland, Mystic Chords of Memory is a brilliant, immensely readable, and enormously important book.

"Fascinating . . . a subtle and teeming narrative . . . masterly."--Time

"This is a big, ambitious book, and Kammen pulls it off admirably. . . . He] brings a prodigious mind and much scholarly rigor to his task. . . . An important book--and a revealing look at how Americans look at themselves."--Milwaukee Journal
The Secret Architecture of Our Nation's Capital: The Masons and the Building of Washington, D.C.
The Secret Architecture of Our Nation's Capital
The Masons and the Building of Washington, D.C.
Paperback      ISBN: 0060953683

Today, there are more than twenty complete zodiacs in Washington, D.C., each one pointing to an extraordinary mystery. David Ovason, who has studied these astrological devices for ten years, now reveals why they have been placed in such abundance in the center of our nation's capital and explains their interconnections. His richly illustrated text tells the story of how Washington, from its foundation in 1791, was linked with the zodiac, with the meaning of certain stars, and with a hidden cosmological symbolism that he uncovers here for the first time.

Fascinating and thoroughly researched, The Secret Architecture of Our Nation 's Capital is an engrossing book that raises provocative questions and otters complex insights into the meanings behind the mysterious symbols in Washington.

No Small Courage: A History of Women in the United States
No Small Courage
A History of Women in the United States
Hardcover      ISBN: 0195139461

Enriched by the wealth of new research into women's history, No Small Courage offers a lively chronicle of American experience, charting women's lives and experiences with fascinating immediacy from the precolonial era to the present. Individual stories and primary sources-including letters, diaries, and news reports-animate this history of the domestic, professional, and political efforts of American women.

John Demos begins the book with a discussion of Native American women confronting colonization. Leading historians illuminate subsequent eras of social and political change-including Jane Kamensky on women's lives in the colonial period, Karen Manners Smith on the rising tide of political activity by women in the Progressive Era, Sarah Jane Deutsch on the transition of 1920s optimism to the harsh realities of the Great Depression, Elaine Tyler May on the challenges to a gender-defined social order encouraged by World War II, and William H. Chafe on the women's movement and the struggle for political equality since the 1960s. The authors vividly relate such events as Anne Hutchinson's struggle for religious expression in Puritan Massachusetts, former slave Harriet Tubman's perilous efforts to free others in captivity, Rosa Parks's resistance to segregation in the South, and newfound opportunities for professional and personal self-determination available as a result of decades of protest. Dozens of archival illustrations add to the human dimensions of the authoritative text.

No Small Courage dynamically captures the variety and significance of American women's experience, demonstrating that the history of our nation cannot be fully understood without focusing on changes in women's lives.
Africans in America: America's Journey Through Slavery
Africans in America
America's Journey Through Slavery
1st Edition    Hardcover      ISBN: 0151003394

The companion volume to the public television series. This extraordinary examination of slavery in americanca features a four-part history by poet and performance artist Patricia Smith and a dozen fictional narratives by National Book Award-winning novelist Charles Johnson. Two-color with black-and-white illustrations throughout.

Coming to America (Second Edition): A History of Immigration and Ethnicity in American Life
Coming to America (Second Edition)
A History of Immigration and Ethnicity in American Life
Paperback      ISBN: 006050577x

One of America's greatest resources is its diverse population of immigrants. Albert Einstein, Irving Berlin and Madeline Albright are just a few of the many people who came to the United States, enriching our country in the process. Coming to America examines the history of immigration in the United States, from colonial times to modern days.

For more than four hundred years, people have come to the United States from all over the world. Daniels examines the different waves of migration over the years, from the British in the seventeenth century to immigrants from the Caribbean and Eastern Europe. Chapters on the role of ethnicity and race in America, immigration laws and the effect of globalization on the country provide a fuller picture of the immigration experience. Coming to America is a must-read for students, researchers and anyone who is interested in finding out more about their own immigrant ancestors.

Roger Daniels is Charles Phelps Taft Professor of History Emeritus at the University of Cincinnati. He received his Ph.D. from UCLA. He has written widely about Asian Americans and immigration. Among his most recent books are Not Like Us: Immigrants and Minorities in America, 1890-1924; Debating American Immigration, 1882-Present (with Otis Graham); and American Immigration: A Student Companion.

"From almost every corner of the globe, in numbers great and small, America has drawn people whose contributions are as varied as their origins. Historians have spent much of the last generation investigating the separate pieces of that great story. Now historian Roger Daniels has crafted a work that does justice to the whole." -- San Francisco Chronicle--San Francisco Chronicle
The Age of Flight: A History of America's Pioneering Airline
The Age of Flight
A History of America's Pioneering Airline
Hardcover      ISBN: 0966706110

Celebrate 75 years of history and innovation with United Airlines' anniversary coffee-table book. United's rich history, from early airmail carrier to global airline, is presented in stirring words and archival pictures, featuring 256 pages and 286 color and black-and-white photos and illustrations.

Nothing Like It in the World: The Men Who Built the Transcontinental Railroad 1863-1869
Nothing Like It in the World
The Men Who Built the Transcontinental Railroad 1863-1869
Paperback      ISBN: 0743203178
Nothing Like It in the World gives the account of an unprecedented feat of engineering, vision, and courage. It is the story of the men who built the transcontinental railroad--the investors who risked their businesses and money; the enlightened politicians who understood its importance; the engineers and surveyors who risked, and sometimes lost, their lives; and the Irish and Chinese immigrants, the defeated Confederate soldiers, and the other laborers who did the backbreaking and dangerous work on the tracks.

The U.S. government pitted two companies--the Union Pacific and the Central Pacific Railroads--against each other in a race for funding, encouraging speed over caution. Locomotives, rails, and spikes were shipped from the East through Panama or around South America to the West or lugged across the country to the Plains. In Ambrose's hands, this enterprise, with its huge expenditure of brainpower, muscle, and sweat, comes vibrantly to life.