U.S. History
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The Secret Way to War: The Downing Street Memo And the Iraq War's Buried History
The Secret Way to War
The Downing Street Memo And the Iraq War's Buried History
Paperback      ISBN: 1590172078
At the beginning of May 2005, just before the British elections, the London Times published the so-called Downing Street memo, the leaked secret minutes of a July 2002 meeting of senior British foreign policy and security officials. The memo suggested that eight months before the invasion of Iraq, long before weapons inspections resumed, President Bush had already decided on war and to justify it by Iraq’s weapons of mass destruction and links to terrorists, that the “intelligence and facts were being fixed around the policy,” that the US wanted to avoid consulting the UN, and that few plans were being made for the aftermath of war. Largely ignored in the US press for weeks afterward, the memo was finally published, with an extensive commentary by Mark Danner, in The New York Review. Danner wrote two follow-up pieces about the significance of the memo, showing how it proves that Bush had decided to invade Iraq much earlier than he admitted and only agreed to weapons inspections not to avoid war but in the expectation that the Iraqis would invite it by refusing to cooperate. Most important, Danner argues that in the face of such clear evidence of deception, the press, public, and Congress still have not held the administration responsible. The Secret Way to War beings together Mark Danner’s strongly argued analysis of the Downing Street Memo, along with the text of the memo itself and seven other leaked British documents that show Tony Blair’s government struggling to find legal and political rationales and strategies to support regime change in Iraq.
Godless: The Church of Liberalism
Godless
The Church of Liberalism
Hardcover      ISBN: 1400054206
From the conservative spokesperson and author of Slander and How to Talk to a Liberal comes an all new, timely, and thought-provoking study of American politics. 1,000,000 first printing.

The Plantation Mistress: Woman's World in the Old South
The Plantation Mistress
Woman's World in the Old South
Paperback      ISBN: 0394722531
Examines the place of women in the daily life of the Southern plantations before the Civil War and analyzes the women's relationship with slaves and their masters
The Mill on the Boot: The Story of the St. Paul and Tacoma Lumber Company
The Mill on the Boot
The Story of the St. Paul and Tacoma Lumber Company
Paperback      ISBN: 0295962739
The Path to Power: The Years of Lyndon Johnson
The Path to Power
The Years of Lyndon Johnson
Paperback      ISBN: 0679729453
Traces young Lyndon Johnson's rise from Texas poverty to political power, illuminating his political relationships
History of the United States of America During the Administrations of James Madison
History of the United States of America During the Administrations of James Madison
Hardcover      ISBN: 0940450356
This monumental work, the second of two Library of America volumes, culminated Henry Adams’s lifelong fascination with the American past. Writing at the height of his powers, Adams understood the true subject as the consolidation of the American nation and character, and his treatment has never been surpassed. Covering the eight years spanning the presidency of James Madison, this volume chronicles “Mr. Madison’s War”—the most bungled war in American history. The President and Congress delay while the United States is bullied and insulted by both England and France; then they plunge the country into the War of 1812 without providing the troops, monies, or fleets to wage it. The incompetence of the commanders leads to a series of disasters—including the burning of the White House and Capitol while Madison and his cabinet, fleeing from an invading army, watch from the nearby hills of Maryland and Virginia. The war has its heroes, too: William Henry Harrison at Tippecanoe and Andrew Jackson at New Orleans, Commodores Perry and Decatur and the officers and crew of the Constitution. As Adams tells it, though, disgrace, is averted by other means: the ineptitude of the British, the skill of the American artillerymen and privateers, and the diplomatic brilliance of Albert Gallatin and John Quincy Adams, who negotiated the peace treaty at Ghent. The history, full of reversals and paradoxes, ends with the largest irony of all: the United States, the apparent loser of the war, emerges as a great new world power destined to eclipse its European rivals.
The Johnstown Flood
The Johnstown Flood
Paperback      ISBN: 0671207148
A graphic account of the collapse of a poorly constructed dam and the resulting flood which killed 2,000 people and caused a nationwide scandal
Photographic History of the Civil War: The Opening Battles
Photographic History of the Civil War
The Opening Battles
Hardcover      ISBN: 1555211747
Documents the early campaigns of the Civil War with photographs of soldiers, officers, and battlefields
Benjamin Franklin: Writings
Benjamin Franklin
Writings
Hardcover      ISBN: 0940450291
Depicting Franklin as a controversial figure in his own time, this volume includes political, economic, and social pieces, scientific articles, opinions on education and religion, propaganda exercises drawn from "Silence Dogwood," writings from the "Pennsylvania Gazette," and "Poor Richard's Almanack," and letters
Cannery Women, Cannery Lives: Mexican Women, Unionization, and the California Food Processing Industry 1930-1950
Cannery Women, Cannery Lives
Mexican Women, Unionization, and the California Food Processing Industry 1930-1950
Paperback      ISBN: 0826309887
Women have been the mainstay of the grueling, seasonal canning industry for over a century. This book is their collective biography--a history of their family and work lives, and of their union. Out of the labor militancy of the 1930s emerged the United Cannery, Agricultural, Packing, and Allied Workers of America (UCAPAWA). Quickly it became the seventh largest CIO affiliate and a rare success story of women in unions. Thousands of Mexican and Mexican-American women working in canneries in southern California established effective, democratic trade union locals run by local members. These rank-and-file activists skillfully managed union affairs, including negotiating such benefits as maternity leave, company-provided day care, and paid vacations--in some cases better benefits than they enjoy today. But by 1951, UCAPAWA lay in ruins--a victim of red baiting in the McCarthy era and of brutal takeover tactics by the International Brotherhood of Teamsters.