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Minnesota Eats Out: An Illustrated History
Minnesota Eats Out
An Illustrated History
Hardcover      ISBN: 0873514521

"Let's eat out "

Minnesotans have always loved to, in the opulent dining rooms of fancy hotels, in piney resort halls, or in standard around-the-corner cafes, where the food is hot and plentiful. And the best of these eateries inspire cherished memories of fabulous food and charming camaraderie.

Minnesota Eats Out is a virtual romp through the state's dining spots, from early health resorts to Prohibition-era speakeasies to A&W drive-ins, illustrated with nearly one thousand photographs, postcards, menus, matchbooks, and collectible dishes. Kathryn Strand Koutsky and Linda Koutsky narrate the history of dining in the North Star State, highlighting innovative foods, inspired restaurant architecture, and cutting-edge graphic design, along with anecdotes about beloved restaurants remembered through the decades.

Accompanying this rich history is a priceless collection of recipes for dishes made famous through the years, like the pioneers' Indian Pudding and old favorites from Eibner's Bakery in New Ulm or Ruttger's Resort in Brainerd. Eleanor Ostman revised these recipes for preparation in modern kitchens. Embellished with photographs of historic restaurants, collectible tableware, and restaurant ephemera, the recipes invite today's readers to re-create cherished food memories.

Minnesota Eats Out, a one-of-a-kind venture into the state's history, serves up over a century of fine and fun Minnesota dining.

How Soccer Explains The World: An Unlikely Theory Of Globalization
How Soccer Explains The World
An Unlikely Theory Of Globalization
Paperback      ISBN: 0060731427

Soccer is much more than a game, or even a way of life. It is a perfect window into the cross-currents of today's world, with all its joys and its sorrows. In this remarkably insightful, wide-ranging work of reportage, Franklin Foer takes us on a surprising tour through the world of soccer, shining a spotlight on the clash of civilizations, the international economy, and just about everything in between. How Soccer Explains the World is an utterly original book that makes sense of our troubled times.

Read My Lips: A Cultural History of Lipstick
Read My Lips
A Cultural History of Lipstick
Hardcover      ISBN: 0811820114

An illustrated celebration of lipstick documenting its lore and history.

Kooks: A Guide to the Outer Limits of Human Belief
Kooks
A Guide to the Outer Limits of Human Belief
2nd Edition    Paperback      ISBN: 0922915679
A rich compendium of looniness!
Halls of Fame: Essays
Halls of Fame
Essays
Hardcover      ISBN: 1555973140

In these refreshingly bold, creative, and incisive essays, John D'Agata journeys the endless corridors of American's myriad halls of fame and faithfully reports on what he finds there. In a voice all his own, he brilliantly maps his terrain in lists, collage, and ludic narratives. From Martha Graham to the Flat Earth Society, from the brightest light in Vegas to the "outsider artist" Henry Darger, D'Agata's obsessions are as American as they are contemporary.

Contents

Round Trip

Martha Graham, Audio Description Of

Flat Earth Map: An Essay

Hall of Fame: An Essay About the Ways in Which We Matter

Notes toward the making of a whole human being . . .

Collage History of Art, by Henry Darger

And There Was Evening and There Was Morning

Notes

Change Your Underwear Twice a Week: Lessons from the Golden Age of Classroom Filmstrip
Change Your Underwear Twice a Week
Lessons from the Golden Age of Classroom Filmstrip
Paperback      ISBN: 1579652638

In the pre-Internet, pre-VCR--oh, go ahead, call them prehistoric--days of baby boomers' grade school, the high art of audiovisual classroom programming was the filmstrip. If you're old enough, you remember the darkened room, the hum of the projector, and the beeep that signaled the teacher to turn to the next frame.

If you weren't busy shooting spitballs, filmstrips might even have taught you something about science, hygiene, the great bounty of American farms and factories. With simple illustrations and quaint photographs that evoke a more innocent era, Change Your Underwear Twice a Week is the first book to collect dozens of these filmstrip treasures together, creating a panorama of four decades of overlooked graphic design, popular culture, and inadvertent humor.

Readers from the Internet generation will get a good chuckle over what appears to be electronic cave art. But you'll also discover one of the great subtexts of postwar American life. From the mid-1940s until the late 1960s, filmstrips were the coming attractions of capitalism and the American way, teaching youngsters how society wanted them to view the world.

Filmstrips celebrated our foundering railroads ("Tommy Takes a Train Trip"), the space program ("The Moon, Our Nearest Neighbor"), and our trusted friend the butcher, the milkman, the mailman, and the cop. They taught us not to sit too close to our new TV sets and why we should change our underwear twice a week (presumably, Commies did this only once a week).

A chronicle of America's filmstrip experience, Change Your Underwear Twice a Week is also a glimpse into the companies and eccentric pioneers who created these graphic gems and how they influenced several generations of American youth.

Dreaming War
Dreaming War
Paperback      ISBN: 1560255021
When Gore Vidal's recent New York Times bestseller Perpetual War for Perpetual Peace was published, the Los Angeles Times described Vidal as the last defender of the American republic. In Dreaming War, Vidal continues this defense by confronting the Cheney-Bush junta head on in a series of devastating essays that demolish the lies American Empire lives by, unveiling a counter-history that traces the origins of America's current imperial ambitions to the experience of World War Two and the post-war Truman doctrine. And now, with the Cheney-Bush leading us into permanent war, Vidal asks whose interests are served by this doctrine of pre-emptive war? Was Afghanistan turned to rubble to avenge the 3,000 slaughtered on September 11? Or was "the unlovely Osama chosen on aesthetic grounds to be the frightening logo for our long contemplated invasion and conquest of Afghanistan?" After all he was abruptly replaced with Saddam Hussein once the Taliban were overthrown. And while "evidence" is now being invented to connect Saddam with 9/11, the current administration are not helped by "stories in the U.S. press about the vast oil wealth of Iraq which must- for the sake of the free world- be reassigned to U.S. consortiums."
Don't Think Of An Elephant!: Know Your Values And Frame The Debate
Don't Think Of An Elephant!
Know Your Values And Frame The Debate
Paperback      ISBN: 1931498717

'Don't Think of an Elephant' offers analysis of the key issues in the 2004 U.S. election and beyond, discussing how progressives need to better examine issues in order to counter conservative arguments.

Lipstick Traces: A Secret History of the 20th Century
Lipstick Traces
A Secret History of the 20th Century
Paperback      ISBN: 0674535812

This is a secret history of modern times, told by way of what conventional history tries to exclude. Lipstick Traces tells a story as disruptive and compelling as the century itself. Hip, metaphorical and allusive...--Gail Caldwell, Boston Sunday Globe. Full-color illustrations and halftones.

Vermeer in Bosnia
Vermeer in Bosnia
Hardcover      ISBN: 0679442707

From the master chronicler of the marvelous and the confounding-author of "Mr. Wilson's Cabinet of Wonder"-here is a much-anticipated new collection of more than twenty pieces from the past two decades, the majority of which have never before been gathered together in book form.
Lawrence Weschler is not simply a superb reporter, essayist, and cultural observer; he is also an uncanny collector and connector of wonders. In "Vermeer in Bosnia," whether he is reporting on the aftermath of the Yugoslav wars (and noticing, for example, how centuries earlier Vermeer had had to invent the peace and serenity we so prize in his work today from a youth during which all of Europe had been as ravaged as Bosnia) or dissecting the special quality of light in his beloved hometown of Los Angeles, Weschler's perceptions are often startling, his insights both fresh and profound.
Included here is Weschler's remarkable profile of Roman Polanski-written years before the release of The Pianist, yet all but predicting the director's confrontation with the Holocaust in that film-alongside an equally celebrated portrait of Ed Weinberger, a young designer crushed and yet hardly bowed by an extreme form of Parkinson's disease. Here is Weschler limning his own experience as the grandson of an eminent Weimar-era composer, and then as the befuddled father of an eminently fetching daughter. Here is Weschler on Art Spiegelman, David Hockney, Ed Kienholz, and Wislawa Szymborska.
Here, in short, are some of the most dazzling pieces from Lawrence Weschler's own brimming cabinet of marvels.