Ancient Buildings
The Ancient City: A Study on the Religion, Laws, and Institutions of Greece and Rome
The Ancient City
A Study on the Religion, Laws, and Institutions of Greece and Rome
Paperback      ISBN: 0801823048
The Architecture of Alexandria and Egypt c. 300 BC To AD 700
The Architecture of Alexandria and Egypt c. 300 BC To AD 700
Paperback      ISBN: 0300170947
This masterful history of the monumental architecture of Alexandria, as well as of the rest of Egypt, encompasses an entire millennium—from the city’s founding by Alexander the Great in 331 B.C. to the years just after the Islamic conquest of A.D. 642. Long considered lost beyond recall, the architecture of ancient Alexandria has until now remained mysterious. But here Judith McKenzie shows that it is indeed possible to reconstruct the city and many of its buildings by means of meticulous exploration of archaeological remains, written sources, and an array of other fragmentary evidence. The book approaches its subject at the macro- and the micro-level: from city-planning, building types, and designs to architectural style. It addresses the interaction between the imported Greek and native Egyptian traditions; the relations between the architecture of Alexandria and the other cities and towns of Egypt as well as the wider Mediterranean world; and Alexandria’s previously unrecognized role as a major source of architectural innovation and artistic influence. Lavishly illustrated with new plans of the city in the Ptolemaic, Roman, and Byzantine periods; reconstruction drawings; and photographs, the book brings to life the ancient city and uncovers the true extent of its architectural legacy in the Mediterranean world.
Architecture Without Architects: A Short Introduction to Non-Pedigreed Architecture
Architecture Without Architects
A Short Introduction to Non-Pedigreed Architecture
Paperback      ISBN: 0826310044
Shows underground homes, nomadic and aquatic homes, hill towns, fortified villages, arcades, covered streets, monasteries graineries, and amphitheaters around the world
The Building Program of Herod the Great
The Building Program of Herod the Great
Hardcover      ISBN: 0520209346
Herod the Great, King of Judaea from 444 B.C., is known as one of the world's great villains. This notoriety has overshadowed his actual achievements, particularly his role as a client king of Rome during Augustus's reign as emperor. An essential aspect of Herod's responsibilities as king of Judaea was his role as a builder. Remarkably innovative, he created an astonishing record of architectural achievement, not only in Judaea but also throughout Greece and the Roman east. Duane W. Roller systematically presents and discusses all the building projects known to have been initiated by Herod, and locates this material in a broad historical and cultural context. Bringing together previously inaccessible material, Roller enriches our understanding of the enigmatic Herod and provides new insights into Roman architecture. Herod was instrumental in the diffusion of the Augustan architectural revolution into the provinces and was the first to build outside Italy such Italian architectural forms as the basilica, amphitheater, villa, and Italian temple. Herod's legacy provided a groundwork for the architectural Romanization of the east, influencing the construction of the great temple complexes and palaces so familiar from later Roman architecture. Herod, like Augustus himself, was not only interested in architecture but also in diplomatic and financial contacts among cities of the region. In addition to providing a repertorium of the building projects, this study is also an exploration of international relations in the eastern Mediterranean at the beginning of the Roman imperial period. Herod the Great, King of Judaea from 444 B.C., is known as one of the world's great villains. This notoriety has overshadowed his actual achievements, particularly his role as a client king of Rome during Augustus's reign as emperor. An essential aspect of Herod's responsibilities as king of Judaea was his role as a builder. Remarkably innovative, he created an astonishing record of architectural achievement, not only in Judaea but also throughout Greece and the Roman east. Duane W. Roller systematically presents and discusses all the building projects known to have been initiated by Herod, and locates this material in a broad historical and cultural context. Bringing together previously inaccessible material, Roller enriches our understanding of the enigmatic Herod and provides new insights into Roman architecture. Herod was instrumental in the diffusion of the Augustan architectural revolution into the provinces and was the first to build outside Italy such Italian architectural forms as the basilica, amphitheater, villa, and Italian temple. Herod's legacy provided a groundwork for the architectural Romanization of the east, influencing the construction of the great temple complexes and palaces so familiar from later Roman architecture. Herod, like Augustus himself, was not only interested in architecture but also in diplomatic and financial contacts among cities of the region. In addition to providing a repertorium of the building projects, this study is also an exploration of international relations in the eastern Mediterranean at the beginning of the Roman imperial period.
Tilt: A Skewed History of the Tower of Pisa
Tilt
A Skewed History of the Tower of Pisa
Paperback      ISBN: 0143034502
A detailed chronicle of the famous architectural and cultural structure notes its century-long construction postponement after the erection of the first four stories in 1173; its survival of earthquakes, war, and tourism; the 1360 addition of its bell tower; and the contributions of such figures as Galileo, Machiavelli, and da Vinci. Reprint.
Voyages of the Pyramid Builders: The True Origins of the Pyramids from Lost Egypt to Ancient America
Voyages of the Pyramid Builders
The True Origins of the Pyramids from Lost Egypt to Ancient America
Paperback      ISBN: 1585423203
Contends that ancient cultures traveled great distances by sea and that primeval sailors were responsible for exchanging information on how to build pyramid-like structures throughout the world. Reprint.