Japanese Art
Netsuke
Netsuke
Hardcover      ISBN: 0764328476

Netsuke, the carved toggles used to fasten a small container to a kimono sash, made from ivory, wood, porcelain, and more, are among the most popular Asian antiques. Over 970 vivid images of netsuke are shown, representing Japanese life, customs, religion, professions, art, history, and legends. The netsukes are organized by subject, allowing readers to rapidly find those that interest them most. The succinct text introduces, defines, and describes the various types of netsukes and helps identify the subjects represented. Additionally, important evaluating tips are provided, along with a bibliography. This book is a must for anyone interested in Oriental art



Night Parade of Dead Souls: Japanese Ghost Paintings
Night Parade of Dead Souls
Japanese Ghost Paintings
Paperback      ISBN: 1840683120

The female ghost or yurei (literally, "faded spirit") is perhaps the most recognizable figure in Japanese horror culture, powerfully reinforced through the success of Japanese ghost films such as Ringu ("The Ring") and Ju-On ("The Grudge"). Their traditional appearance -- long black hair in disarray over the face, white skin and white burial clothing -- goes back to the very first painted scroll images of such creatures, of which the prototype is said to be Maruyama Okyo's painting of the ghost of the geisha Oyuki, from 1750. "Night Parade Of Dead Souls," the first book of its kind to be published in English, collects 70 of the most striking and disturbing Japanese ghost images from classic art, and offers an essential glimpse into the twilight strata of Japanese art, popular myth, and religious belief. The artists featured range from obscure painters to the venerated ukiyo-e artist Tsukioka Yoshitoshi, who created numerous ghost paintings around 1880. All the paintings, which range in date from 1750 to the early 20th century, are shown at full-page length, and in full colour throughout. The Ukiyo-e Master Series: presenting seminal collections of art by the greatest print-designers and painters of Edo-period and Meiji-period Japan.

Obtaining Images: Art, Production, and Display in EDO Japan
Obtaining Images
Art, Production, and Display in EDO Japan
Hardcover      ISBN: 0824836138

The Edo period (1603-1868) witnessed one of the great flowerings of Japanese art. Towards the mid-seventeenth century, the Japanese states were largely at peace, and rapid urbanization, a rise in literacy and an increase in international contact ensued. The number of those able to purchase luxury goods, or who felt their social position necessitated owning them, soared. Painters and artists flourished and the late seventeenth century also saw a rise in the importance of printmaking. There were dominant styles and trends throughout Japan, but also those peculiar to specifc regions, such as the Kanto (Edo) and the Kamigata (Osaka and Kyoto) and, more remotely, Nagasaki.

Obtaining Images introduces the reader to important artists and their work, but also to the intellectual issues and concepts surrounding the production, consumption and display of art in Japan in the Edo period. Rather than looking at these through the lens of European art, the book contextualizes the making and use of paintingsand prints, elucidating how and why works were commissioned, where they were displayed and what special properties were attributed to them.

Different imperatives are at work in the art of different traditions, and Obtaining Images firmly anchors the art of Japan of this period in its contemporary context, offering a highly engaging and comprehensive introduction for the student and general reader alike.
Plum Blossom and Green Willow: Japanese Surimono Poetry Prints from the Ashmolean Museum
Plum Blossom and Green Willow
Japanese Surimono Poetry Prints from the Ashmolean Museum
Paperback      ISBN: 1910807265

- An introduction to the art of surimono, illustrated with previously unpublished examples from the Ashmolean Museum's collections- The works included here have never-published before in any form- The poems included in the works have been translated into EnglishBecause money was no object, surimono usually used the finest materials and printing techniques. Most consisted of a picture combined with related poems, and the arrangement of the illustration and the calligraphic text was often very beautifully designed. Exquisite in design and technique and usually small in size, surimono have been described as 'jewels of Japanese printmaking' and have great visual appeal. Despite this, this will be the first time that the Ashmolean's collection of surimono, mostly from the Jennings-Spalding Gift and containing a number of rare and previously unpublished prints, has ever been catalogued.

The Printer's Eye: Ukiyo-E from the Grabhorn Collection
The Printer's Eye
Ukiyo-E from the Grabhorn Collection
Paperback      ISBN: 0939117606
Featuring over 100 rare Japanese woodblock prints and thoughtful commentary, The Printer's eye paints a vibrant and fascinating picture of Japan's Uikoyo-e or "floating world."

Edwin Grabhorn (1889--1968), co-founder of the Grabhorn Press, Northern California's premier letterpress printer, was a pioneer American collector of Japanese prints. The Grabhorn prints in the collection of the Asian Art Museum comprise the upper echelons of the original collection. The collection includes a superb selection of early monochrome and hand-colored ukiyo-e prints by Sugimura Jihei, Torii Kiyonobu, Okumura Masanobu and others, from the seminal decades of the woodblock print production in the late 1600s and early 1700s.

Japanese Prints from the Grabhorn Collection marks the first time these prints are being published in quantity for a wide audience. Leading scholars David Waterhouse and Julia Meech provide in-depth looks at the prints in their Japanese contexts and at Grabhorn's role as a print collector. Large full-color reproductions all 140 of the Grabhorn prints in the Asian Art Museum's collection are accompanied by entries by Laura Allen and Melissa Rinne.
Radicals and Realists in the Japanese Nonverbal Arts: The Avant-Garde Rejection of Modernism
Radicals and Realists in the Japanese Nonverbal Arts
The Avant-Garde Rejection of Modernism
Hardcover      ISBN: 0824830113

Radicals and Realists is the first book in any language to discuss Japan's avant-garde artists, their work, and the historical environment in which they produced it during the two most creative decades of the twentieth century, the 1950s and 1960s. Many of the artists were radicals, rebelling against existing canons and established authority. Yet at the same time they were realists in choosing concrete materials, sounds, and themes from everyday life for their art and in gradually adopting tactics of protest or resistance through accommodation rather than confrontation. Whatever the means of expression, the production of art was never devoid of historical context or political implication. Focusing on the nonverbal genres of painting, sculpture, dance choreography, and music composition, this work shows that generational and political differences, not artistic doctrines, largely account for the divergent stances artists took vis-a-vis modernism, the international arts community, Japan's ties to the United States, and the alliance of corporate and bureaucratic interests that solidified in Japan during the 1960s.

After surveying censorship and arts policy during the American occupation of Japan (1945-1952), the narrative divides into two chronological sections dealing with the 1950s and 1960s, bisected by the rise of an artistic underground in Shinjuku and the security treaty crisis of May 1960. The first section treats Japanese artists who studied abroad as well as the vast and varied experiments in each of the nonverbal avant-garde arts that took place within Japan during the 1950s, after long years of artistic insularity and near-stasis throughout war and occupation. Chief among the intellectuals who stimulated experimentation were the art critic Takiguchi Shuzo, the painter Okamoto Taro, and the businessman-painter Yoshihara Jiro. The second section addresses the multifront assault on formalism (confusingly known as anti-art) led by visual artists nationwide. Likewise, composers of both Western-style and contemporary Japanese-style music increasingly chose everyday themes from folk music and the premodern musical repertoire for their new presentations. Avant-garde print makers, sculptors, and choreographers similarly moved beyond the modern--and modernism--in their work. A later chapter examines the artistic apex of the postwar period: Osaka's 1970 world exposition, where more avant-garde music, painting, sculpture, and dance were on display than at any other point in Japan's history, before or since.

Radicals and Realists is based on extensive archival research; numerous concerts, performances, and exhibits; and exclusive interviews with more than fifty leading choreographers, composers, painters, sculptors, and critics active during those two innovative decades. Its accessible prose and lucid analysis recommend it to a wide readership, including those interested in modern Japanese art and culture as well as the history of the postwar years.
The Sixty-Nine Stations of the Kisokaido
The Sixty-Nine Stations of the Kisokaido
Hardcover      ISBN: 0807615935

Reproduced from the finest surviving edition of a rare manuscript, this book brings Hiroshige and Eisen's portrait of daily life in 19th-century Japan to Western audiences for the first time.

Tall Mountains and Flowing Waters: The Arts of Uragami Gyokudo
Tall Mountains and Flowing Waters
The Arts of Uragami Gyokudo
Hardcover      ISBN: 0824810392
Tattoos in Japanese Prints
Tattoos in Japanese Prints
Hardcover      ISBN: 0878468463

Tattoo inspiration from the glory days of Japanese ukiyo-e prints

Many tattoo connoisseurs consider the Japanese tradition to be the finest in the world for its detail, complexity and compositional skill. Its style and subject matter are drawn from the visual treasure trove of Japanese popular culture, in particular the color woodblock prints of the early 19th century known as ukiyo-e.

This book tells the fascinating story of how ukiyo-e first inspired tattoo artists as the pictorial tradition of tattooing in Japan was just beginning. It explores the Japanese tattoo's evolving meanings, from symbol of devotion to punishment and even to crime, and reveals the tales behind specific motifs. With lush, colorful images of flowers blooming on the arm of a thief, sea monsters coiling across the back of a hero and legendary warriors battling on the chests of actors, the tattoos in these prints can offer the same vivid inspiration today as they did 200 years ago.

Tokyo: Form and Spirit
Tokyo
Form and Spirit
Hardcover      ISBN: 0810916908

Essays discuss the evolution of Tokyo's art and architecture from the seventeenth century to the present and the coexistence of technology and tradition.