Labor History
Featured Items
Part of Our Time: Some Ruins and Monuments of the Thirties
Part of Our Time
Some Ruins and Monuments of the Thirties
Paperback      ISBN: 1590170873
A collection of portaits of America's communists, union leaders, and mobsters of the 1930s.
Shop Class as Soulcraft: An Inquiry into the Value of Work
Shop Class as Soulcraft
An Inquiry into the Value of Work
Hardcover      ISBN: 1594202230
In this wise and often funny book, a philosopher/mechanic systematically destroys the pretensions of the high-prestige workplace and makes an irresistible case for working with oneÂ's hands Shop Class as Soulcraft brings alive an experience that was once quite ordinary, but now seems to be receding over the cultural horizon—the experience of making and fixing things. Working with your hands, as Mathew B. Crawford describes it, connects us to the world around us. Those of us who sit in an office often have intuitions of something gone amiss, a sense of unreality accompanied by feelings of impotence. What, after all, do we do all day? In this wholly original debut, Crawford offers a brief for self-reliance and a sustained reflection on this problem: how to live concretely in an ever more abstract world. Shop Class as Soulcraft seeks to restore the honor of the manual trades as a life worth choosing for anyone who felt hustled off to college, then to the cubicle, against their own inclinations and natural bents. On both economic and psychological grounds, Crawford questions the educational imperative of turning everyone into a “knowledge worker.Â

Gig: Americans Talk About Their Jobs
Gig
Americans Talk About Their Jobs
Paperback      ISBN: 0609807072
A diverse group of 120 people talk about their lives and work in the "new economy," describing a wide variety of careers from the conventional to the bizarre, from a personal injury trial lawyer, nurse, and journalist to an adult web mistress, crime scene cleaner, and telephone psychic. Reprint. 25,000 first printing.
From the Folks Who Brought You the Weekend: An Illustrated History of Labor in the United States
From the Folks Who Brought You the Weekend
An Illustrated History of Labor in the United States
Paperback      ISBN: 1620974487
“A marvelously informed, carefully crafted, far-ranging history of working people.” —Noam Chomsky An updated edition of “an evergreen . . . comparable to Howard Zinn’s award–winning A People’s History of the United States” (Publishers Weekly) Hailed as a work of “impressive even-handedness and analytic acuity” (Publishers Weekly, starred review), From the Folks Who Brought You the Weekend has set the standard for viewing American history through the prism of working people. From indentured servants and slaves in seventeenth-century Chesapeake to high-tech workers in contemporary Silicon Valley, the book “[puts] a human face on the people, places, events, and social conditions that have shaped the evolution of organized labor” (Library Journal), enlivened by numerous full-page illustrations throughout from the celebrated comics journalist Joe Sacco. In this fully updated new edition, authors Priscilla Murolo and A.B. Chitty have added a wealth of fresh analysis of labor’s role in American life, with new material on sex workers, disability issues, labor’s relation to the global justice movement and the immigrants’ rights movement, the 2005 split in the AFL-CIO and the movement civil wars that followed, and the crucial emergence of worker centers and their relationships to unions. With two entirely new chapters—one on global developments, from the movement of jobs offshore to the emergence of modern global union federations, and a second on the 2016 election and unions’ relationships to Trump—From the Folks Who Brought You the Weekend will remain the standard, “comprehensive history of American labor” (The Washington Post).
The Death and Life of American Labor: Toward a New Workers' Movement
The Death and Life of American Labor
Toward a New Workers' Movement
Paperback      ISBN: 1784783005
"Union membership in the United States has fallen below 11 percent, the lowest rate since before the New Deal. Longtime scholar of the American union movement Stanley Aronowitz argues that the labor movement as we have known it for most of the last 100 years is effectively dead. And he asserts that this death has been a long time coming--the organizing principles chosen by the labor movement at midcentury have come back to haunt the movement today. In an expansive survey of new initiatives, strikes, organizations and allies Aronowitz analyzes the possibilities of labor's renewal, and sets out a program for a new, broad, radical workers' movement"--
Reform or Repression: Organizing America's Anti-Union Movement
Reform or Repression
Organizing America's Anti-Union Movement
Hardcover      ISBN: 0812247760
Examining the professional lives of a variety of businessmen and their advocates with the intent of taking their words seriously, Chad Pearson paints a vivid picture of an epic contest between industrial employers and labor, and challenges our comfortable notions of Progressive Era reformers.
No Logo: Taking Aim at the Brand Bullies
No Logo
Taking Aim at the Brand Bullies
Paperback      ISBN: 0312271921
A free-wheeling analysis and exploration of the invasion of our personal lives by logo-wielding power-hungry corporations combines muckraking journalism with contemporary memoir to discuss current consumer culture and the dark side of the information age. Reprint. 12,500 first printing.
Nickel and Dimed: On (Not) Getting by in America
Nickel and Dimed
On (Not) Getting by in America
Paperback      ISBN: 0312626681
"Millions of Americans work full-time, year-round, for poverty-level wages. In 1998, Barbara Ehrenreich decided to join them. She was inspired in part by the rhetoric surrounding welfare reform, which promised that a job--any job--can be the ticket to a better life. But how does anyone survive, let alone prosper, on $6 an hour? To find out, Ehrenreich left her home, took the cheapest lodgings she could find, and accepted whatever jobs she was offered. Moving from Florida to Maine to Minnesota, she workedas a waitress, a hotel maid, a cleaning woman, a nursing home aide, and a Wal-Mart sales clerk. She lived in trailer parks and crumbling residential motels. Very quickly, she discovered that no job is truly "unskilled," that even the lowliest occupationsrequire exhausting mental and muscular effort. She also learned that one job is not enough; you need at least two if you intend to live indoors. Nickel and Dimed reveals low-rent America in all its tenacity, anxiety, and surprising generosity--a land of Big Boxes, fast food, and a thousand desperate strategems for survival. Read it for the smoldering clarity of Ehrenreich's perspective and for a rare view of how "prosperity" looks from the bottom. You will never see anything--from a motel bathroom to a restaurant meal--quite the same way again. "--
Recent History of the Labor Movement in the United States, 1939-1965
Recent History of the Labor Movement in the United States, 1939-1965
Hardcover      ISBN: 0828515824
The Psychopath Factory: How Capitalism Organises Empathy
The Psychopath Factory
How Capitalism Organises Empathy
Paperback      ISBN: 1910924407
The Psychopath Factory: How Capitalism Organizes Empathy examines how the requirements, stimuli, affects and environments of work condition our empathy. In some cases, work calls for no empathy – characters who don’t blink or flinch in the face of danger nor crack under pressure. In other cases, capitalism requires empathy in spades –charming, friendly, sensitive and listening managers, customer service agents and careers. When workers are required to either ignore their empathy to-do a job, or dial it up to increase productivity, they are entering a psychopathic modality. The affective blitz of work, flickering screens, emotive content, vibrating alerts and sounding alarms erode our sensitivities whilst we are modulated with attention stimulants, social lubricants and so called anti-anxiety drugs. This is amidst a virulent and exacerbating climate of competition and frenzied quantification. Capitalism pressures us to feign empathy and leverage social relationships on one hand, whilst being cold and pragmatic on the other. We are passionate and enthusiastic whilst keeping a professional distance. Sympathy, care, compassion and altruism are important; The Psychopath Factory: How Capitalism Organizes Empathy argues that itis a mistake to presuppose that empathy can achieve these. Rather than being subject to the late capitalist organization of our empathy, psychopathy could be a means of escape.