European Architecture
Seismic Modernism: Architecture and Housing in Soviet Tashkent
Seismic Modernism
Architecture and Housing in Soviet Tashkent
Paperback      ISBN: 3869224932

Tashkent, the southernmost metropolis of millions in the Soviet Union, is a city redolent with architectural contrasts and paradoxes. Home to the most beautiful prefabricated buildings in the world, it features a prominent urban duality predicated upon the oriental Old City and the Russian New City. Never was this contrast brought into sharper focus than during the severe earthquake of 1966 which left the New City relatively unscathed but the Old City in ruins, and more than 200,000 people homeless. Yet one respite was offered: a rebuilding effort which triggered an upsurge of innovation. The city thus became the face of seismic modernism - unprecedented in history, the earthquake stimulated modernisation of urban development in Tashkent. Architects incorporated regional building traditions in their socialist modern designs, including the visually intriguing fa ade mosaics attributed to the little-known Zharsky brothers. The rebuilding of Tashkent thus provides a perfect example of Soviet ideas about urban planning - in which technical standardisation and social requirements were no more of a contradiction than the design of experimental living concepts and the simultaneous search for an expression of national identity in building. Tashkent thus represents a unique example of the radical urban redevelopment of a Soviet megacity with standard designs.

The Small House in Eighteenth-Century London: A Social and Architectural History
The Small House in Eighteenth-Century London
A Social and Architectural History
Hardcover      ISBN: 0300102380

London's modest eighteenth-century houses--those inhabited by artisans and laborers in the unseen parts of Georgian London--can tell us much about the culture of that period. This fascinating book examines largely forgotten small houses that survive from the eighteenth century and sheds new light on both the era's urban architecture and the lives of a culturally distinctive metropolitan population.

Peter Guillery discusses how and where, by and for whom the houses were built, stressing vernacular continuity and local variability. He investigates the effects of creeping industrialization (both on house building and on the occupants), and considers the nature of speculative suburban growth. Providing rich and evocative illustrations, he compares these houses to urban domestic architecture elsewhere, as in North America, and suggests that the eighteenth-century vernacular metropolis has enduring influence.

Spying on Moscow: A Winged Guide to Architecture
Spying on Moscow
A Winged Guide to Architecture
Hardcover      ISBN: 3869226080

This collector's album presents Moscow's architectural icons. With photographic precision, Denis Esakov captures the fifth fa ade of the largest European metropolis: roofs, domes, and cube-like buildings stacked on top of each other. By gazing through the drone's eye, the artist fosters a novel visual aesthetic that opens up new vistas, even for Moscow connoisseurs.

Summerfolk: A History of the Dacha, 1710-2000
Summerfolk
A History of the Dacha, 1710-2000
Hardcover      ISBN: 0801440718

The dacha is a sometimes beloved, sometimes scorned Russian dwelling. Alexander Pushkin summered in one; Joseph Stalin lived in one for the last twenty years of his life; and contemporary Russian families still escape the city to spend time in them. Stephen Lovell's generously illustrated book is the first social and cultural history of the dacha. Lovell traces the dwelling's origins as a villa for the court elite in the early eighteenth century through its nineteenth-century role as the emblem of a middle-class lifestyle, its place under communist rule, and its post-Soviet incarnation.A fascinating work rich in detail, Summerfolk explores the ways in which Russia's turbulent past has shaped the function of the dacha and attitudes toward it. The book also demonstrates the crucial role that the dacha has played in the development of Russia's two most important cities, Moscow and St. Petersburg, by providing residents with a refuge from the squalid and crowded metropolis. Like the suburbs in other nations, the dacha form of settlement served to alleviate social anxieties about urban growth. Lovell shows that the dacha is defined less by its physical location"usually one or two hours" distance from a large city yet apart from the rural hinterland--than by the routines, values, and ideologies of its inhabitants.Drawing on sources as diverse as architectural pattern books, memoirs, paintings, fiction, and newspapers, he examines how dachniki ("summerfolk") have freed themselves from the workplace, cultivated domestic space, and created informal yet intense intellectual communities. He also reflects on the disdain that many Russians have felt toward the dacha, and their association of its lifestyle with physical idleness, private property, and unproductive use of the land. Russian attitudes toward the dacha are, Lovell asserts, constantly evolving. The word "dacha" has evoked both delight in and hostility to leisure. It has implied both the rejection of agricultural labor and, more recently, a return to the soil. In Summerfolk, the dacha is a unique vantage point from which to observe the Russian social landscape and Russian life in the private sphere.

Tempietto del Clitunno
Tempietto del Clitunno
Hardcover      ISBN: 0271017287

This is the first full-length study of the enigmatic Early Medieval chapel near the river Clitunno in central Umbria. Judson Emerick makes the Tempietto del Clitunno, a celebrated art-historical test case, the focus of a study that penetrates to the deep structure of the discipline.

For centuries scholars have puzzled over the chapel's lavish Corinthian column screens, the crosses surrounded by Neo-Attic vine scrolls in its pedimental reliefs, and the Christian Latin inscriptions in huge Neo-Augustan block capitals from its friezes. The sixteenth-century humanists who named the building the "Tempietto del Clitunno" treated it as an ancient Roman temple that the Christians later converted. But modern art historians, learning that the Tempietto had been built from the ground up as a chapel, declared it an anomaly, the product of a most startling and unexpected Early Christian and medieval classical revival.

Emerick intervenes by critiquing the notion of classical revival in medieval architecture. Impatient with the old Enlightenment historical plot that makes the Tempietto into a dark-age prodigy, Emerick boldly redescribes the architectural record to take away the Tempietto's strangeness. He shows conclusively that the chapel's orders, pedimental reliefs, and inscriptions conform to ancient Roman Imperial Corinthian standards, but then goes on to show that just this Corinthian decorative system was frequent, even normal in festive, public, Christian cult rooms from Constantine's day down through the twelfth century.

History of style as an end in itself yields here to style treated as political phenomenon. Emerick turns to the frescoes on the Tempietto's rear apse wall for clues to the builders' political goals. He explains how grandees from the medieval Lombardo-Frankish Duchy of Spoleto, full participants in a Christian theocratic state, set up an array of Mediterranean icons inside the Tempietto to enhance their social and political control. The chapel's Corinthian decorative system, he concludes, must be integral to this political program.

Timber Building
Timber Building
Paperback      ISBN: 030436665x

This description of Timber Building in Britain, now in its second edition, by the Society for the Protection of Ancient Buildings defines the status of this authoritative and extensively illustrated book.

Urban Design in Western Europe: Regime and Architecture, 900-1900
Urban Design in Western Europe
Regime and Architecture, 900-1900
Paperback      ISBN: 0226071790

What makes a city endure and prosper? In this masterful survey of a thousand years of urban architecture, Wolfgang Braunfels identified certain themes common to cities as different as Siena and London, Munich and Venice. Most important is an architecture that expresses the city's personality and most particularly its political personality. Braunfels describes and classifies scores of cities cathedral cities, city-state, maritime cities, imperial cities and examines the links between their political and architectural histories. Lavishly illustrated with city plans, bird's-eye views, early renderings, and modern photographs, this book will delight and instruct architects, urban planners, historians, and travelers."

UrbanEurope
UrbanEurope
Hardcover      ISBN: 8869651061

It is not easy to understand and accept the wholeness of the linking concept subtended by the word "Europe."

This volume is a very poetic dream: thanks to photography, it creates a composite scenery narrating a single identity, a possible Europe-city, having--despite its being subdivided in separate countries--an enclosing, recognizable, and shareable scale.

Marco Zanta invents this new European city that one day we will learn to experience as a common country.

The White Tower
The White Tower
Hardcover      ISBN: 0300112939

The White Tower--the gigantic structure at the heart of the building complex known as the Tower of London--gave that famed landmark its name. One of the most celebrated buildings of the London cityscape for nearly 1000 years, it is also the most complete eleventh-century palace in Europe.

This book is a complete architectural, archaeological and historical study of White Tower and its context. Edward Impey and other distinguished experts integrate the most recent archaeological evidence with documentary research in order to trace the building's structural development, its original and subsequent functions, and its architectural and historical significance. The book will be an important resource for scholars of European Romanesque castle architecture.