United States Architecture
The Big House: A Century in the Life of an American Summer Home
The Big House
A Century in the Life of an American Summer Home
Paperback      ISBN: 074324964x
Faced with the sale of the century-old family summer house on Cape Cod where he had spent forty-two summers, George Howe Colt recounts returning for one last stay with his wife and children in this stunning memoir that was a National Book Award Finalist and a New York Times Notable Book of the Year.

This poignant tribute to the eleven-bedroom jumble of gables, bays, and dormers that watched over weddings, divorces, deaths, anniversaries, birthdays, breakdowns, and love affairs for five generations interweaves Colt's final visit with memories of a lifetime of summers. Run-down yet romantic, The Big House stands not only as a cherished reminder of summer's ephemeral pleasures but also as a powerful symbol of a vanishing way of life.
Biltmore Estate: The Most Distinguished Private Place
Biltmore Estate
The Most Distinguished Private Place
Hardcover      ISBN: 084781811x

The most distinguished private place - that is how, in 1893, the great landscape architect Frederick Law Olmsted described Biltmore Estate, perhaps the most ambitious private building project of America's Gilded Age. It was only five years earlier that George Washington Vanderbilt purchased the first parcel of what would become his 125,000-acre estate in Asheville, North Carolina. Along with Olmsted, he commissioned the preeminent architect of the day, Richard Morris Hunt, to design the estate. The house, modeled in part on the chateaux of the Loire Valley, has become one of the greatest and most important in American architectural history. Its 255 rooms, with spectacular and finely crafted interiors, opulent furnishings (some designed by Hunt), and furniture and decorative arts objects collected by Vanderbilt from all corners of the world, have made it a rich national treasure. The estate served as the cradle of the profession of forestry in America. With Olmsted's advice and expertise, it became the first working model of a scientifically managed forest and played a critical role in the creation of our national parks. This meticulously researched book accompanies an exhibition organized by The Octagon, the Museum of the American Architectural Foundation; it chronicles Biltmore from inception, development, and construction through its Christmas 1895 opening celebrations, and into the present. Original architectural drawings, sketches, plans, presentation drawings, nineteenth-century photographs, and vibrant new color photography complete this portrait of a great landmark. Today Biltmore Estate belongs to George Washington Vanderbilt's descendants, who have opened the house to the public and have made it one of the most visited in America.

Building Zion: The Material World of Mormon Settlement
Building Zion
The Material World of Mormon Settlement
Paperback      ISBN: 0816689571

For Mormons, the second coming of Christ and the subsequent millennium will arrive only when the earth has been perfected through the building of a model world called Zion. Throughout the nineteenth century the Latter-day Saints followed this vision, creating a material world--first in Missouri and Illinois but most importantly and permanently in Utah and surrounding western states--that serves as a foundation for understanding their concept of an ideal universe.

Building Zion is, in essence, the biography of the cultural landscape of western LDS settlements. Through the physical forms Zion assumed, it tells the life story of a set of Mormon communities--how they were conceived and constructed and inhabited--and what this material manifestation of Zion reveals about what it meant to be a Mormon in the nineteenth century. Focusing on a network of small towns in Utah, Thomas Carter explores the key elements of the Mormon cultural landscape: town planning, residences (including polygamous houses), stores and other nonreligious buildings, meetinghouses, and temples. Zion, we see, is an evolving entity, reflecting the church's shift from group-oriented millenarian goals to more individualized endeavors centered on personal salvation and exaltation.

Building Zion demonstrates how this cultural landscape draws its singularity from a unique blending of sacred and secular spaces, a division that characterized the Mormon material world in the late nineteenth century and continues to do so today.

Buildings of Alaska
Buildings of Alaska
Paperback      ISBN: 0195093801

Buildings of Alaska traces Alaska's architecture from the earliest dwellings made of sod, whalebone, and driftwood to the glass and metal skyscrapers of modern-day Anchorage. Focusing on the various cultural traditions that have helped shape the state's architecture, the volume also explores how Alaska's buildings reflect Alaskan's attempt to adapt to the unique conditions of their environment.
Here, Alison K. Hoagland examimes the contribution to the state's architectural history of three major cultural groups: native Alaskans, Russian settlers, and Americans for the lower 48. Divided into six regions--South Central, Southeastern, Interior, Northern, Western, and Southwestern--entries cover such structures as aboriginal houses, Russian Orthodix chruches, log roadhouses, false-front commercial buildings constructed during the gold-rush, concrete Moderne public buildings of the 1930s, and high-rise office buildings erected during the oil boom of the 1970s and 1980s.
With over 250 photgraphs, drawings, and maps, Buildings of Alaska is an unprecedented look at how Alaska's buildings reveal the personal attitudes and cultural precepts of its diverse group of inhabitants.

Buildings of Alaska
Buildings of Alaska
Hardcover      ISBN: 0195073630

In Buildings of Alaska, Alison K. Hoagland examines Alaska's architectural history as it was developed by three major cultural groups: native Alaskans, Russian settlers, and Americans from the Lower 48. Divided into six regions--South Central, Southeastern, Interior, Northern, Western, and Southwestern--the book's entries include such structures as aboriginal houses made of driftwood or whalebone, Russian Orthodox churches, and versions of architectural styles imported (albeit revised for Alaska's frigid climate) from California, Seattle, New England, and elsewhere in the contiguous United States.

California Luxury Living: A Private Tour
California Luxury Living
A Private Tour
Hardcover      ISBN: 186470439x

* The world's most luxurious homes captured in exquisite detail across over 250 spectacular full color pages * Explores the inspirational work of world-renowned architect John Finton California Luxury Living: A Private Tour is a visual exploration of world-renowned builder John Finton's most outstanding houses, with a breathtaking range of styles from French Normandy to Traditional Malibu Beach, and Italian Modern to Asian Contemporary. More than just houses, many of these estates are complete with bowling alleys, vineyards, polo fields, movie theaters and more. Among the firm's discerning and often repeat clientele are captains of industry and international business executives, along with a bevy of A-list celebrities. Known as the Indiana Jones of the building industry, John Finton regularly travels the world to source the most appropriate and unique reclaimed materials - from Chinese cobblestones to centuries-old Indonesian teak - to augment his stunning constructions.

Chicago Architecture and Design 1923-1993: An American Metropolis
Chicago Architecture and Design 1923-1993
An American Metropolis
Paperback      ISBN: 0865591091
Classic Cracker: Florida's Wood-Frame Architecture
Classic Cracker
Florida's Wood-Frame Architecture
Paperback      ISBN: 156164014x

Winner of the 1993 LoPresti Award for excellence in art publishing

Cracker homes take the best advantage of the climate and terrain of Florida. This book provides a history of Florida wood-frame architecture, from the simplest "single-pen" homesteads to the latest homes at Seaside, and includes several floor plans for new adaptations of classic Cracker architecture. Learn about the double-pen house, the classic dogtrot, the four-square Georgian, the Cracker townhouse, and much more with this exploration of Florida's orginal architecture.

Includes several floor plans for new adaptations of classic Cracker architecture.

Common Landscape of America, 1580-1845
Common Landscape of America, 1580-1845
Paperback      ISBN: 0300030460

"A first-rate introduction to a still largely extant North America away from the great cities. This 400-page documentary by a dedicated exploring scholar explains how and why the landscape changed between the times of the early Spanish settlers and the impact of industrialization."--House and Garden
"A remarkable book. John Stilgoe has provided us with a panorama of American land development that is unique in the literature of this filed. In the process he has sharpened the reader's perception of the historic struggle between those who would tend the land and those who would exploit it, thus making a significant statement about issues in the forefront at the present day. Stilgoe's global vision over time, combined with his remarkable facility for involving a great variety of elements into one coherent system of thought and feeling, makes this a deeply important and timely work."--Edmund N. Bacon
"Recalls how Europeans shaped this country's landscape out of wilderness and, by the way, helped to create our sense of beauty, comfort, and appropriateness...A book that will change the way its readers look about them."--The New Yorker
"Focusing on vernacular design and its evolution, Stilgoe effectively demonstrates how builders (rather than professional designers) passed on their traditions from one generation to the next--in so doing shaping America's enduring attitudes towards landscape. An original and fascinating study."--H. Ward Jandl, Library Journal
Winner of the 1982 Francis Parkman Prize for Literary Distinction in the Writing of History.

Common Places: Readings in American Vernacular Architecture
Common Places
Readings in American Vernacular Architecture
Paperback      ISBN: 0820307505

Exploring America's material culture, Common Places reveals the history, culture, and social and class relationships that are the backdrop of the everyday structures and environments of ordinary people. Examining America's houses and cityscapes, its rural outbuildings and landscapes from perspectives including cultural geography, decorative arts, architectural history, and folklore, these articles reflect the variety and vibrancy of the growing field of vernacular architecture.

In essays that focus on buildings and spaces unique to the U.S. landscape, Clay Lancaster, Edward T. Price, John Michael Vlach, and Warren E. Roberts reconstruct the social and cultural contexts of the modern bungalow, the small-town courthouse square, the shotgun house of the South, and the log buildings of the Midwest. Surveying the buildings of America's settlement, scholars including Henry Glassie, Norman Morrison Isham, Edward A. Chappell, and Theodore H. M. Prudon trace European ethnic influences in the folk structures of Delaware and the houses of Rhode Island, in Virginia's Renish homes, and in the Dutch barn widely repeated in rural America.

Ethnic, regional, and class differences have flavored the nation's vernacular architecture. Fraser D. Neiman reveals overt changes in houses and outbuildings indicative of the growing social separation and increasingly rigid relations between seventeenth-century Virginia planters and their servants. Fred B. Kniffen and Fred W. Peterson show how, following the westward expansion of the nineteenth century, the structures of the eastern elite were repeated and often rejected by frontier builders. Moving into the twentieth century, James Borchert tracks the transformation of the alley from an urban home for Washington's blacks in the first half of the century to its new status in the gentrified neighborhoods of the last decade, while Barbara Rubin's discussion of the evolution of the commercial strip counterpoints the goals of city planners and more spontaneous forms of urban expression.

The illustrations that accompany each article present the artifacts of America's material past. Photographs of individual buildings, historic maps of the nation's agricultural expanse, and descriptions of the household furnishings of the Victorian middle class, the urban immigrant population, and the rural farmer's homestead complete the volume, rooting vernacular architecture to the American people, their lives, and their everyday creations.