Asian-American Studies
The Book of Tea
The Book of Tea
2nd Edition    Hardcover      ISBN: 0983610606
The original 1906 edition of The Book of Tea is one of the classic texts found on the desks of artists, poets, teaists and Zen Buddhists around the world. The book has been re-designed and expanded for a contemporary audience. You will discover the fascinating character of Okakura Kakuzo and the story of how he came to write one of the twentieth century’s most influential books on art, beauty, and simplicity—all steeped in the world’s communal cup of tea. His incredible journey took him from Yokohama to New York, Paris, Bombay, and Boston, where his life intertwined with such luminaries as Rabindranath Tagore, John Singer Sargent, Henry James, John La Farge, Isabella Stewart Gardner, Ezra Pound, and Henri Matisse. His writings influenced the work of such notable artists as Frank Lloyd Wright and Georgia O'Keeffe. American tea writer Bruce Richardson includes many historical photographs and illustrations in this updated edition of Okakura’s classic text, along with unique insight into how Okakura's philosophy continues to inspire today’s tea culture. Plus, Richardson includes an all-new chapter on America's thirst for Japanese tea during the late 1800s, illustrated with archival photographs. A beautiful work of art in tribute to a beautiful work of art. - Norwood Pratt, San Francisco For those of us who, for years, have loved and been influenced by Okakura's prose and philosophy, this new edition brings fresh insight and clarity to the work. With sensitivity, admiration and profound appreciation for Okakura, Bruce Richardson unravels the complex and intriguing story that lies behind the original Book of Tea. All tea lovers will treasure this beautiful and valuable work. -Jane Pettigrew, London I had read about Okakura and visited the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum, but never realized the importance of the relationship between the two and how they embodied the bridge between East and West. Nor, until now, had I taken the time to read the entire book. How I wish that I had read it before I visited Japan where I learned that “Zen is another word for tea.
Born to Kill: The Rise and Fall of America's Bloodiest Asian Gang
Born to Kill
The Rise and Fall of America's Bloodiest Asian Gang
Paperback      ISBN: 0061782386
An Edgar Award-nominated account of organized crime activities in New York's Chinatown at the end of the twentieth century offers insight into the plights of Vietnam War orphans, the leadership of megalomaniacal psychopath David Thai, and the brave contributions of former gang member Tinh Ngo. 25,000 first printing. Reprint.

Breaking the Bamboo Ceiling: Career Strategies for Asians
Breaking the Bamboo Ceiling
Career Strategies for Asians
Paperback      ISBN: 0060731222
A career guide for Asian-American workers cites the population's growing numbers as well as its struggles to achieve equality in corporate America in spite of high aptitude and educational levels, counseling readers on how to overcome cultural factors that may have resulted in career-compromising misunderstandings or misrepresentations. Reprint. 10,000 first printing.
The Bride Price: A Hmong Wedding Story
The Bride Price
A Hmong Wedding Story
Paperback      ISBN: 1681340364
When Mai Neng Moua decides to get married, her mother, a widow, wants the groom to follow Hmong custom and pay a bride price, which both honors the work the bride's family has done in raising a daughter and offers a promise of love and security from the groom's family. Mai Neng, who knows the pain this tradition has caused, says no. Her husband-to-be supports her choice. What happens next is devastating, and it raises questions about the very meaning of being Hmong in America. The couple refuses to participate in the tshoob, the traditional Hmong marriage ceremony; many members of their families, on both sides, stay away from their church wedding. Months later, the families carry out the tshoob without the wedding couple. But even after the bride price has been paid, Mai Neng finds herself outside of Hmong culture and at odds with her mother, not realizing the full meaning of the customs she has rejected. As she navigates the Hmong world of animism, Christianity, and traditional gender roles, she begins to learn what she has not been taught. Through a trip to Thailand, through hard work in the garden, through the birth of another generation, one strong woman seeks reconciliation with another.
The Broken Country: On Trauma, a Crime, and the Continuing Legacy of Vietnam
The Broken Country
On Trauma, a Crime, and the Continuing Legacy of Vietnam
Paperback      ISBN: 0820351172
The Broken County explores the cultural and psychological effects of Vietnam on both Southeast Asian refugees and returning U.S. veterans. Rekdal examines the complicated ways in which we struggle to comprehend and memorialize the war.
The Burden of White Supremacy: Containing Asian Migration in the British Empire and the United States
The Burden of White Supremacy
Containing Asian Migration in the British Empire and the United States
1st Edition    Paperback      ISBN: 1469630273
From 1896 to 1924, motivated by fears of an irresistible wave of Asian migration and the possibility that whites might be ousted from their position of global domination, British colonists and white Americans instituted stringent legislative controls on Chinese, Japanese, and South Asian immigration. Historians of these efforts typically stress similarity and collaboration between these movements, but in this compelling study, David C. Atkinson highlights the differences in these campaigns and argues that the main factor unifying these otherwise distinctive drives was the constant tensions they caused. Drawing on documentary evidence from the United States, Great Britain, Australia, Canada, South Africa, and New Zealand, Atkinson traces how these exclusionary regimes drew inspiration from similar racial, economic, and strategic anxieties, but nevertheless developed idiosyncratically in the first decades of the twentieth century. Arguing that the so-called white man's burden was often white supremacy itself, Atkinson demonstrates how the tenets of absolute exclusion--meant to foster white racial, political, and economic supremacy--only inflamed dangerous tensions that threatened to undermine the British Empire, American foreign relations, and the new framework of international cooperation that followed the First World War.
Children of Reunion: Vietnamese Adoptions and the Politics of Family Migrations
Children of Reunion
Vietnamese Adoptions and the Politics of Family Migrations
Paperback      ISBN: 1469630915
In 1961, the U.S. government established the first formalized provisions for intercountry adoption just as it was expanding America's involvement with Vietnam. Adoption became an increasingly important portal of entry into American society for Vietnamese and Amerasian children, raising questions about the United States' obligations to refugees and the nature of the family during an era of heightened anxiety about U.S. global interventions. Whether adopting or favoring the migration of multiracial individuals, Americans believed their norms and material comforts would salve the wounds of a divisive war. However, Vietnamese migrants challenged these efforts of reconciliation. As Allison Varzally details in this book, a desire to redeem defeat in Vietnam, faith in the nuclear family, and commitment to capitalism guided American efforts on behalf of Vietnamese youths. By tracing the stories of Vietnamese migrants, however, Varzally reveals that while many had accepted separations as a painful strategy for survival in the midst of war, most sought, and some eventually found, reunion with their kin. This book makes clear the role of adult adoptees in Vietnamese and American debates about the forms, privileges, and duties of families, and places Vietnamese children at the center of American and Vietnamese efforts to assign responsibility and find peace in the aftermath of conflict.
China In War And Revolution, 1895-1949
China In War And Revolution, 1895-1949
Hardcover      ISBN: 0415364477
Providing historical insights essential to the understanding of contemporary China, this text presents a nation's story of trauma and growth during the early twentieth century. It explains how China's defeat by Japan in 1895 prompted an explosion of radical reform proposals and the beginning of elite Chinese disillusionment with the Qing government. The book explores how this event also prompted five decades of efforts to strengthen the state and the nation, democratize the political system, and build a fairer and more unified society. Peter Zarrow weaves narrative together with thematic chapters that pause to address in-depth themes central to China's transformation. While the book proceeds chronologically, the chapters in each part examine particular aspects of these decades in a more focused way, borrowing from methodologies of the social sciences, cultural studies, and empirical historicism. Essential reading for both students and instructors alike, it draws a picture of the personalities, ideas and processes by which a modern state was created out of the violence and trauma of these decades.
The Chinese in America: A Narrative History
The Chinese in America
A Narrative History
Paperback      ISBN: 0142004170
Chronicles the history of Chinese immigrants in the United States, identifying their contributions to the nation's development, from the construction of the transcontinental railroad to scientific and technological advances.
Chinese in Minnesota
Chinese in Minnesota
Paperback      ISBN: 087351470x
"Sherri Gerbert Fuller provides us with a rare look at Chinese immigrant lives and aspirations in Minnesota, proudly reclaiming their voices as part of our great American heritage. I was delighted to read this book."--Iris Chang, author of The Chinese in America Minnesota's first Chinese settlers, fleeing racial violence in California, established scores of businesses after they arrived in the late 1870s. Newspapers eagerly published reports of their activities, including New Year's festivities, marriages, and restaurant and laundry openings. Beginning in 1882 federal laws banning Chinese immigration and denying citizenship put particular pressure on the community. Sherri Gebert Fuller relates the story of the Chinese from these early days to the 1960s when a new wave of immigrants, including students, businessmen, and professionals from China and Taiwan, began to bring new energy and issues to the community and a flourishing of ties between Minnesota and China.