Asian-American Studies
Asian American History: A Very Short Introduction
Asian American History
A Very Short Introduction
Paperback      ISBN: 0190219769
Asians have migrated to North America for centuries, in search of opportunities and conveyed by increasingly dense, international circuits of trade, labor markets, and family networks. Drawn by the riches promised by the relatively undeveloped, but not unpopulated, New World, Asians joined a diverse array of immigrants arriving in capacities such as merchants, farmers, fishermen, soldiers, missionaries, artists and artisans, industrial and agricultural laborers, technicians and scientists, journalists, sailors, diplomats, tourists, bankers, students, and entrepreneurs of every stripe. They contributed significantly to the massive transformation of the United States into the wealthiest and most powerful nation in the world, particularly on the west coast and Hawaii. Unlike their European counterparts, however, Asians challenged American conceptions of racial homogeneity and national culture which produced legislative and institutional efforts to segregate them through immigration laws, restrictions on citizenship, and limits on employment, property ownership, access to public services, and civil rights. Only with World War II, the Cold War, and the Civil Rights era's remaking of racial ideologies and forging of a more egalitarian, multiethnic democracy Asian Americans have gained ground and acceptance, albeit in the still stereotyped category of "model minorities." Asian American History: A Very Short Introduction provides a narrative interpretation of key themes that emerge in the history of Asian migrations to North America. Clearly written and elegantly argued, this book complements typical American history narratives by highlighting how Asian immigration has shaped the evolution of ideological and legal interpretations of America as a "nation of immigrants."
Asian American Studies Now: A Critical Reader
Asian American Studies Now
A Critical Reader
Paperback      ISBN: 0813545757
This massive volume introduces readers to the field of Asian American Studies via an interdisciplinary selection of essays, fiction, and historical documents. In four parts, the book situates Asian Americans in the racial and social background of the U.S.; analyzes major events and core themes in Asian American history; examines the struggles over meaning and power that shape the Asian American community; and discusses the purpose, pedagogies, and future directions of Asian American Studies. Both illuminating and challenging, this collection is the definitive introductory text for students in the field. Annotation ©2010 Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
Asians Wear Clothes on the Internet: Race, Gender, and the Work of Personal Style Blogging
Asians Wear Clothes on the Internet
Race, Gender, and the Work of Personal Style Blogging
Paperback      ISBN: 0822360306
In the first ever book devoted to a critical investigation of the personal style blogosphere, Minh-Ha T. Pham examines the phenomenal rise of elite Asian bloggers who have made a career of posting photographs of themselves wearing clothes on the Internet. Pham understands their online activities as “taste work
Bamboo Among the Oaks: Contemporary Writing by Hmong Americans
Bamboo Among the Oaks
Contemporary Writing by Hmong Americans
Paperback      ISBN: 0873514378
Of an estimated twelve million ethnic Hmong in the world, more than 160,000 live in the United States today, most of them refugees of the Vietnam War and the civil war in Laos. Their numbers make them one of the largest recent immigrant groups in our nation. Today, significant Hmong populations can be found in California, Minnesota, Wisconsin, North Carolina, Michigan, and Colorado, and St. Paul boasts the largest concentration of Hmong residents of any city in the world. In this groundbreaking anthology, first-and second-generation Hmong Americans—the first to write creatively in English—share their perspectives on being Hmong in America. In stories, poetry, essays, and drama, these writers address the common challenges of immigrants adapting to a new homeland: preserving ethnic identity and traditions, assimilating to and battling with the dominant culture, negotiating generational conflicts exacerbated by the clash of cultures, and developing new identities in multiracial America. Many pieces examine Hmong history and culture and the authors' experiences as Americans. Others comment on issues significant to the community: the role of women in a traditionally patriarchal culture, the effects of violence and abuse, the stories of Hmong military action in Laos during the Vietnam War. These writers don't pretend to provide a single story of the Hmong; instead, a multitude of voices emerge, some wrapped up in the past, others looking toward the future, where the notion of "Hmong American" continues to evolve. In her introduction, editor Mai Neng Moua describes her bewilderment when she realized that anthologies of Asian American literature rarely contained even one selection by a Hmong American. In 1994, she launched a Hmong literary journal, Paj Ntaub Voice, and in the first issue asked her readers "Where are the Hmong American voices?" Now this collection—containing selections from the journal as well as new submissions—offers a chorus of voices from a vibrant and creative community of Hmong American writers from across the United States.
Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother
Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother
Paperback      ISBN: 0143120581
After igniting a firestorm of debate across the nation, Amy Chua's daring, conversation-changing memoir is now in paperback. At once provocative and laugh-out-loud funny, Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother set off a global parenting debate with its story of one mother's journey in strict parenting. Amy Chua argues that Western parenting tries to respect and nurture children's individuality, while Chinese parents typically believe that arming children with skills, strong work habits, and inner confidence prepares them best for the future. Achingly honest and profoundly challenging, Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother chronicles Chua's iron-willed decision to raise her daughters, Sophia and Lulu, the Chinese way-and the remarkable, sometimes heartbreaking results her choice inspires.
Between Foreign and Family: Return Migration and Identity Construction Among Korean Americans and Korean Chinese
Between Foreign and Family
Return Migration and Identity Construction Among Korean Americans and Korean Chinese
Paperback      ISBN: 0813586135
Between Foreign and Family explores the impact of inconsistent rules of ethnic inclusion and exclusion on the economic and social lives of Korean Americans and Korean Chinese living in Seoul. These actors are part of a growing number of return migrants, members of an ethnic diaspora who migrate “back” to the ancestral homeland from which their families emigrated. Drawing on ethnographic observations and interview data, Helene K. Lee highlights the “logics of transnationalism” that shape the relationships between these return migrants and their employers, co-workers, friends, family, and the South Korean state. While Koreanness marks these return migrants as outsiders who never truly feel at home in the United States and China, it simultaneously traps them into a liminal space in which they are neither fully family, nor fully foreign in South Korea. Return migration reveals how ethnic identity construction is not an indisputable and universal fact defined by blood and ancestry, but a contested and uneven process informed by the interplay of ethnicity, nationality, citizenship, gender, and history.
Beyond the Narrow Gate: The Journey of Four Chinese Women from the Middle Kingdom to the Middle America
Beyond the Narrow Gate
The Journey of Four Chinese Women from the Middle Kingdom to the Middle America
Paperback      ISBN: 0452277612
Chronicles the fates of four extraordinary Chinese women, forced to flee China in 1947 after the Communist takeover, as they meet in Taiwan in 1948 and struggle to build new lives for themselves in America. Reprint.
Beyond the Shadow of Camptown: Korean Military Brides in America
Beyond the Shadow of Camptown
Korean Military Brides in America
Paperback      ISBN: 0814796990
Since the beginning of the Korean War in 1950, nearly 100,000 Korean women have immigrated to the United States as the wives of American soldiers. Based on extensive oral interviews and archival research,Beyond the Shadow of the Camptowns tells the stories of these women, from their presumed association with U.S. military camptowns and prostitution to their struggles within the intercultural families they create in the United States. Historian Ji-Yeon Yuh argues that military brides are a unique prism through which to view cultural and social contact between Korea and the U.S. After placing these women within the context of Korean-U.S. relations and the legacies of both Japanese and U.S. colonialism vis á vis military prostitution, Yuh goes on to explore their lives, their coping strategies with their new families, and their relationships with their Korean families and homeland. Topics range from the personal—the role of food in their lives—to the communal the efforts of military wives to form support groups that enable them to affirm Korean identity that both American and Koreans would deny them. Relayed with warmth and compassion, this is the first in-depth study of Korean military brides, and is a groundbreaking contribution to Asian American, women's, and "new" immigrant studies, while also providing a unique approach to military history.
Beyond the Tiger Mom: East-West Parenting for the Global Age
Beyond the Tiger Mom
East-West Parenting for the Global Age
Hardcover      ISBN: 0804849528
How do Asian parents prime their children for success from a young age by encouraging them to achieve academic excellence? Why do Asian kids do so well in math and science? What is the difference between an Asian upbringing and a Western one? These are just a few of the fascinating questions posed and discussed in Beyond the Tiger Mom, a captivating new book by educator, author, and mother, Maya Thiagarajan. In this research-backed guide, she examines each of the "tiger mother" stereotypes and goes beneath the surface to discover what happens in Asian parenting households. How do Asian parents think about childhood, family, and education and what can Western parents learn from them? And what benefits does a traditional Western upbringing have that Asian parents, too, may want to consider? Some of the takeaways of this parenting book include: - The best of Asian parenting practices — such as how to teach children math, or raise tech-healthy kids - Teaching your child to broaden his or her attention span - Finding the right balance between work and play, while including family time - Helping your child see failure as a learning experience - And many, many more insights Each chapter offers interviews with hundreds of Asian parents and kids and ends with a "How To" section of specific tips for Asian and Western parents both to aid childhood education and development inside and outside the classroom. Woven into this narrative are her reflections on teaching and parenting in locations that span the East and West. In this book, Thiagarajan synthesizes an extensive body of research on child education and Asian parenting both to provide accessible and practical guidelines for parents.
Big Little Man: In Search of My Asian Self
Big Little Man
In Search of My Asian Self
Hardcover      ISBN: 0547450486
Why do so many people find Asian women sexy but Asian men sexless? Alex Tizon’s family emigrated from the Philippines when he was four. He quickly learned to be ashamed of his face, his color, his physical size. In movies and on television he saw Asian men as “servants, villains, or geeks, one-dimensional, powerless, sneaky little men.