Asian-American Studies
Only What We Could Carry: The Japanese American Internment Experience
Only What We Could Carry
The Japanese American Internment Experience
Paperback      ISBN: 1890771309
Personal documents, art, propoganda, and stories express the Japanese American experience in internment camps after the bombing of Pearl Harbor.
Paper Daughter: A Memoir
Paper Daughter
A Memoir
Paperback      ISBN: 0060930527
A Chinese-American Harvard graduate presents her life story from her childhood inside an ethnic enclave, during which she struggled with racial harassment, and identifies the barriers to success in every American ghetto. Reprint.
Patriot Number One: American Dreams in Chinatown
Patriot Number One
American Dreams in Chinatown
Hardcover      ISBN: 0451496132
The deeply reported story of one indelible family transplanted from rural China to New York City, forging a life between two worlds In 2014, in a snow-covered house in Flushing, Queens, a village revolutionary from Southern China considered his options. Zhuang Liehong was the son of a fisherman, the former owner of a small teashop, and the spark that had sent his village into an uproar—pitting residents against a corrupt local government. Under the alias Patriot Number One, he had stoked a series of pro-democracy protests, hoping to change his home for the better. Instead, sensing an impending crackdown, Zhuang and his wife Little Yan left their infant son with relatives and traveled to America. With few contacts and only a shaky grasp of English, they had to start from scratch. In Patriot Number One, Hilgers follows this dauntless family through a world hidden in plain sight: a byzantine network of employment agencies and language schools, of underground asylum brokers and illegal dormitories that Flushing’s Chinese community relies on for survival. As the irrepressibly opinionated Zhuang and the more pragmatic Little Yan pursue legal status and struggle to reunite with their son, we also meet others piecing together a new life in Flushing. Tang, a democracy activist who was caught up in the Tiananmen Square crackdown in 1989, is still dedicated to his cause after more than a decade in exile. Karen, a college graduate whose mother imagined a bold American life for her, works part time in a nail salon as she attends vocational school, and refuses to look backward. With a novelist’s eye for character and detail, Hilgers captures the joys and indignities of starting from scratch in a new country—and the stubborn allure of the American dream.
A People's History of the Hmong
A People's History of the Hmong
Hardcover      ISBN: 0873517261
A rich narrative history of the worldwide community of Hmong people, exploring their cultural practices, war and refugee camp experiences, and struggles and triumphs as citizens of new countries.
A People's History of the Hmong
A People's History of the Hmong
Paperback      ISBN: 0873519604
A rich narrative history of the worldwide community of Hmong people, exploring their cultural practices, war and refugee camp experiences, and struggles and triumphs as citizens of new countries.
The Phenomenon of Chinese Culture at the Turn of the 21st Century
The Phenomenon of Chinese Culture at the Turn of the 21st Century
Hardcover      ISBN: 9814332356
Informative and accessible, this record conducts a multidirectional scan of contemporary China’s cultural conflict, revealing that the carnival under globalization is only a false characterization of this era. An authoritative resource, this account argues that modernity fractures the history of experience, tradition perseveres, and cultural conflict will inevitably follow.
Placing Memory: A Photographic Exploration of Japanese American Internment
Placing Memory
A Photographic Exploration of Japanese American Internment
Hardcover      ISBN: 080613951x
Placing Mnnory is a powerful visual record of the internment. Featuring Todd Stewart's stunning color photographs of the sites as they appear today, the book is not only an aesthetic tour de force. It also provides a rigorous visual survey of the physical features of the camps - roads, architectural remains, and monuments - along with maps, statistical information, and archival photographs. Stewart's haunting photographs take us to places such as Heart Mountain, Minidoka, Gila River, and Manzanar, which, although abandoned for fifty years, still convey the unmistakable presence of the thousands interned. Also included in this volume - juxtaposed with Stewart's modern-day images - are the black-and-white photographs commissioned during the 1940s by the War Relocation Authority. Thoughtful essays by Asian American studies scholar Karen J, Leong, photography curator Natasha Egan, and community leader - and former internee - John Tateishi provide provocative context for all the photographs. Placing Memory makes a powerful statement about racial intolerance and injustice. It is a lasting record of a regrettable program and a poignant meditation on the importance of commemorating injustice.
The Poker Bride: The First Chinese in the Wild West
The Poker Bride
The First Chinese in the Wild West
Paperback      ISBN: 0802145272
Retraces the story of the first Chinese men and women who journeyed to the American West during the California Gold Rush, using as a lens into this Chinese experience the little-known story of a Chinese concubine who was won in a poker game and lived out her life as a rancher's wife in the hills of Idaho. Reprint.
A Principled Stand: The Story of Hirabayashi V. United States
A Principled Stand
The Story of Hirabayashi V. United States
Hardcover      ISBN: 0295992700
"I never look at my case as just my own, or just as a Japanese- American case. It is an American case, with principles that affect the fundamental human rights of all Americans." -Gordon K. Hirabayashi In 1943, University of Washington student Gordon Hirabayashi defied the curfew and mass removal of Japanese Americans on the West Coast, and was subsequently convicted and imprisoned as a result. In A Principled Stand, Gordon's brother James and nephew Lane have brought together his prison diaries and voluminous wartime correspondence to tell the story of Hirabayashi v. United States, the Supreme Court case that in 1943 upheld and on appeal in 1987 vacated his conviction. For the first time, the events of the case are told in Gordon's own words. The result is a compelling and intimate story that reveals what motivated him, how he endured, and how his ideals changed and deepened as he fought discrimination and defended his beliefs. A Principled Stand adds valuable context to the body of work by legal scholars and historians on the seminal Hirabayashi case. This engaging memoir combines Gordon's accounts with family photographs and archival documents as it takes readers through the series of imprisonments and court battles Gordon endured. Details such as Gordon's profound religious faith, his roots in student movements of the day, his encounters with inmates in jail, and his daily experiences during imprisonment give texture to his storied life. Gordon K. Hirabayashi (1922-2012) was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom in May 2012. He was professor emeritus of sociology at the University of Alberta, in Edmonton. James A. Hirabayashi (1926-2012) was professor emeritus of Asian American Studies at San Francisco State University. Lane Ryo Hirabayashi is professor of Asian American Studies and the George and Sakaye Aratani Professor of the Japanese American Incarceration, Redress, and Community at UCLA. "A Principled Stand makes an important contribution to understanding both Gordon Hirabayashi's life and the horrible episode in this country's history that was the internment." -Lorraiane Bannai, Fred T. Korematsu Center for Law and Equality, Seattle University School of Law
A Principled Stand: The Story of Hirabayashi V. United States
A Principled Stand
The Story of Hirabayashi V. United States
Paperback      ISBN: 0295994320
In 1943, University of Washington student Gordon Hirabayashi defied the curfew and mass removal of Japanese Americans on the West Coast, and was subsequently convicted and imprisoned as a result. In A Principled Stand, Gordon's brother James and nephew Lane have brought together his prison diaries and voluminous wartime correspondence to tell the story of Hirabayashi v. United States, the Supreme Court case that in 1943 upheld and on appeal in 1987 vacated his conviction. For the first time, the events of the case are told in Gordon's own words. The result is a compelling and intimate story that reveals what motivated him, how he endured, and how his ideals changed and deepened as he fought discrimination and defended his beliefs. A Principled Stand adds valuable context to the body of work by legal scholars and historians on the seminal Hirabayashi case. This engaging memoir combines Gordon's accounts with family photographs and archival documents as it takes readers through the series of imprisonments and court battles Gordon endured. Details such as Gordon's profound religious faith, his roots in student movements of the day, his encounters with inmates in jail, and his daily experiences during imprisonment give texture to his storied life.