Asian-American Studies
A People's History of the Hmong
A People's History of the Hmong
Hardcover      ISBN: 0873517261
A rich narrative history of the worldwide community of Hmong people, exploring their cultural practices, war and refugee camp experiences, and struggles and triumphs as citizens of new countries.
A People's History of the Hmong
A People's History of the Hmong
Paperback      ISBN: 0873519604
A rich narrative history of the worldwide community of Hmong people, exploring their cultural practices, war and refugee camp experiences, and struggles and triumphs as citizens of new countries.
The Phenomenon of Chinese Culture at the Turn of the 21st Century
The Phenomenon of Chinese Culture at the Turn of the 21st Century
Hardcover      ISBN: 9814332356
Informative and accessible, this record conducts a multidirectional scan of contemporary China’s cultural conflict, revealing that the carnival under globalization is only a false characterization of this era. An authoritative resource, this account argues that modernity fractures the history of experience, tradition perseveres, and cultural conflict will inevitably follow.
Placing Memory: A Photographic Exploration of Japanese American Internment
Placing Memory
A Photographic Exploration of Japanese American Internment
Hardcover      ISBN: 080613951x
Placing Mnnory is a powerful visual record of the internment. Featuring Todd Stewart's stunning color photographs of the sites as they appear today, the book is not only an aesthetic tour de force. It also provides a rigorous visual survey of the physical features of the camps - roads, architectural remains, and monuments - along with maps, statistical information, and archival photographs. Stewart's haunting photographs take us to places such as Heart Mountain, Minidoka, Gila River, and Manzanar, which, although abandoned for fifty years, still convey the unmistakable presence of the thousands interned. Also included in this volume - juxtaposed with Stewart's modern-day images - are the black-and-white photographs commissioned during the 1940s by the War Relocation Authority. Thoughtful essays by Asian American studies scholar Karen J, Leong, photography curator Natasha Egan, and community leader - and former internee - John Tateishi provide provocative context for all the photographs. Placing Memory makes a powerful statement about racial intolerance and injustice. It is a lasting record of a regrettable program and a poignant meditation on the importance of commemorating injustice.
The Poker Bride: The First Chinese in the Wild West
The Poker Bride
The First Chinese in the Wild West
Paperback      ISBN: 0802145272
Retraces the story of the first Chinese men and women who journeyed to the American West during the California Gold Rush, using as a lens into this Chinese experience the little-known story of a Chinese concubine who was won in a poker game and lived out her life as a rancher's wife in the hills of Idaho. Reprint.
A Principled Stand: The Story of Hirabayashi V. United States
A Principled Stand
The Story of Hirabayashi V. United States
Hardcover      ISBN: 0295992700
"I never look at my case as just my own, or just as a Japanese- American case. It is an American case, with principles that affect the fundamental human rights of all Americans." -Gordon K. Hirabayashi In 1943, University of Washington student Gordon Hirabayashi defied the curfew and mass removal of Japanese Americans on the West Coast, and was subsequently convicted and imprisoned as a result. In A Principled Stand, Gordon's brother James and nephew Lane have brought together his prison diaries and voluminous wartime correspondence to tell the story of Hirabayashi v. United States, the Supreme Court case that in 1943 upheld and on appeal in 1987 vacated his conviction. For the first time, the events of the case are told in Gordon's own words. The result is a compelling and intimate story that reveals what motivated him, how he endured, and how his ideals changed and deepened as he fought discrimination and defended his beliefs. A Principled Stand adds valuable context to the body of work by legal scholars and historians on the seminal Hirabayashi case. This engaging memoir combines Gordon's accounts with family photographs and archival documents as it takes readers through the series of imprisonments and court battles Gordon endured. Details such as Gordon's profound religious faith, his roots in student movements of the day, his encounters with inmates in jail, and his daily experiences during imprisonment give texture to his storied life. Gordon K. Hirabayashi (1922-2012) was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom in May 2012. He was professor emeritus of sociology at the University of Alberta, in Edmonton. James A. Hirabayashi (1926-2012) was professor emeritus of Asian American Studies at San Francisco State University. Lane Ryo Hirabayashi is professor of Asian American Studies and the George and Sakaye Aratani Professor of the Japanese American Incarceration, Redress, and Community at UCLA. "A Principled Stand makes an important contribution to understanding both Gordon Hirabayashi's life and the horrible episode in this country's history that was the internment." -Lorraiane Bannai, Fred T. Korematsu Center for Law and Equality, Seattle University School of Law
A Principled Stand: The Story of Hirabayashi V. United States
A Principled Stand
The Story of Hirabayashi V. United States
Paperback      ISBN: 0295994320
In 1943, University of Washington student Gordon Hirabayashi defied the curfew and mass removal of Japanese Americans on the West Coast, and was subsequently convicted and imprisoned as a result. In A Principled Stand, Gordon's brother James and nephew Lane have brought together his prison diaries and voluminous wartime correspondence to tell the story of Hirabayashi v. United States, the Supreme Court case that in 1943 upheld and on appeal in 1987 vacated his conviction. For the first time, the events of the case are told in Gordon's own words. The result is a compelling and intimate story that reveals what motivated him, how he endured, and how his ideals changed and deepened as he fought discrimination and defended his beliefs. A Principled Stand adds valuable context to the body of work by legal scholars and historians on the seminal Hirabayashi case. This engaging memoir combines Gordon's accounts with family photographs and archival documents as it takes readers through the series of imprisonments and court battles Gordon endured. Details such as Gordon's profound religious faith, his roots in student movements of the day, his encounters with inmates in jail, and his daily experiences during imprisonment give texture to his storied life.
Race, Religion, and Civil Rights: Asian Students on the West Coast, 1900-1968
Race, Religion, and Civil Rights
Asian Students on the West Coast, 1900-1968
Paperback      ISBN: 0813571782
Histories of civil rights movements in America generally place little or no emphasis on the activism of Asian Americans. Yet, as this fascinating new study reveals, there is a long and distinctive legacy of civil rights activism among foreign and American-born Chinese, Japanese, and Filipino students, who formed crucial alliances based on their shared religious affiliations and experiences of discrimination. Stephanie Hinnershitz tells the story of the Asian American campus organizations that flourished on the West Coast from the 1900s through the 1960s. Using their faith to point out the hypocrisy of fellow American Protestants who supported segregation and discriminatory practices, the student activists in these groups also performed vital outreach to communities outside the university, from Californian farms to Alaskan canneries. Highlighting the unique multiethnic composition of these groups,Race, Religion, and Civil Rights explores how the students' interethnic activism weathered a variety of challenges, from the outbreak of war between Japan and China to the internment of Japanese Americans during World War II. Drawing from a variety of archival sources to bring forth the authentic, passionate voices of the students,Race, Religion, and Civil Rights is a testament to the powerful ways they served to shape the social, political, and cultural direction of civil rights movements throughout the West Coast.
Racial Ambiguity in Asian American Culture
Racial Ambiguity in Asian American Culture
Paperback      ISBN: 0813570697
The sheer diversity of the Asian American populace makes them an ambiguous racial category. Indeed, the 2010 U.S. Census lists twenty-four Asian-ethnic groups, lumping together under one heading people with dramatically different historical backgrounds and cultures. In Racial Ambiguity in Asian American Culture, Jennifer Ann Ho shines a light on the hybrid and indeterminate aspects of race, revealing ambiguity to be paramount to a more nuanced understanding both of race and of what it means to be Asian American. Exploring a variety of subjects and cultural artifacts, Ho reveals how Asian American subjects evince a deep racial ambiguity that unmoors the concept of race from any fixed or finite understanding. For example, the book examines the racial ambiguity of Japanese American nisei Yoshiko Nakamura deLeon, who during World War II underwent an abrupt transition from being an enemy alien to an assimilating American, via the Mixed Marriage Policy of 1942. It looks at the blogs of Korean, Taiwanese, and Vietnamese Americans who were adopted as children by white American families and have conflicted feelings about their “honorary white
Racial Feelings: Asian America in a Capitalist Culture of Emotion
Racial Feelings
Asian America in a Capitalist Culture of Emotion
Paperback      ISBN: 1439911932
"In Racial Feelings, Jeffrey Santa Ana examines how Asian American narratives communicate and critique-to varying degrees-the emotions that power the perception of Asians as racially different. Santa Ana explores various forms of Asian American culturalproduction, ranging from literature and graphic narratives to film and advertising, to illuminate the connections between global economic relations and the emotions that shape aspirations for the good life. He illustrates his argument with examples including the destitute Filipino immigrant William Paulinha, in Han Ong's Fixer Chao, who targets his anger on the capitalist forces of objectification that racially exploit him, and Nan and Pingpin in Ha Jin's A Free Life, who seek happiness and belonging in America. Racial Feelings addresses how Asian Americans both resist and rely on stereotypes in their writing and art work. In addition, Santa Ana investigates how capitalism shapes and structures an emotional discourse that represents Asians as both economic exemplars and threats. "--