United States History 1800-1900
Featured Items
American Reformers, 1815-1860, Revised Edition
American Reformers, 1815-1860, Revised Edition
Paperback      ISBN: 0809015889

For this new edition of American Reformers 1815-1860, Ronald G. Walters has amplified and updated his exploration of the fervent and diverse outburst of reform energy that shaped American history in the early years of the Republic. Capturing in style and substance the vigorous and often flamboyant men and women who crusaded for such causes as abolition, temperance, women's suffrage, and improved health care, Walters presents a brilliant analysis of how the reformers' radical belief that individuals could fix what ailed America both reflected major transformations in antebellum society and significantly affected American culture as a whole.

Henry Clay: Statesman for the Union
Henry Clay
Statesman for the Union
Paperback      ISBN: 0393310884

Among the nineteenth-century Americans, few commanded the reverence and respect accorded to Henry Clay of Kentucky. As orator and as Speaker of the House for longer than any man in the century, he wielded great power, a compelling presence in Congress who helped preserve the Union in the antebellum period. Remini portrays both the statesman and the private man, a man whose family life was painfully torn and who burned with ambition for the office he could not reach, the presidency.

Roll, Jordan, Roll: The World the Slaves Made
Roll, Jordan, Roll
The World the Slaves Made
Paperback      ISBN: 0394716523

This landmark history of slavery in the South--a winner of the Bancroft Prize--challenged conventional views of slaves by illuminating the many forms of resistance to dehumanization that developed in slave society.

Rather than emphasizing the cruelty and degradation of slavery, historian Eugene Genovese investigates the ways that slaves forced their owners to acknowledge their humanity through culture, music, and religion. Not merely passive victims, the slaves in this account actively engaged with the paternalism of slaveholding culture in ways that supported their self-respect and aspirations for freedom. Roll, Jordan, Roll covers a vast range of subjects, from slave weddings and funerals, to the language, food, clothing, and labor of slaves, and places particular emphasis on religion as both a major battleground for psychological control and a paradoxical source of spiritual strength. Displaying keen insight into the minds of both slaves and slaveholders, Roll, Jordan, Roll is a testament to the power of the human spirit under conditions of extreme oppression.
Henry Adams: History of the United States Vol. 2 1809-1817 (Loa #32): The Administrations of James Madison
Henry Adams: History of the United States Vol. 2 1809-1817 (Loa #32)
The Administrations of James Madison
Hardcover      ISBN: 0940450356

This monumental work, the second of two Library of America volumes, culminated Henry Adams's lifelong fascination with the American past. Writing at the height of his powers, Adams understood the true subject as the consolidation of the American nation and character, and his treatment has never been surpassed.

Covering the eight years spanning the presidency of James Madison, this volume chronicles "Mr. Madison's War"--the most bungled war in American history. The President and Congress delay while the United States is bullied and insulted by both England and France; then they plunge the country into the War of 1812 without providing the troops, monies, or fleets to wage it. The incompetence of the commanders leads to a series of disasters--including the burning of the White House and Capitol while Madison and his cabinet, fleeing from an invading army, watch from the nearby hills of Maryland and Virginia.

The war has its heroes, too: William Henry Harrison at Tippecanoe and Andrew Jackson at New Orleans, Commodores Perry and Decatur and the officers and crew of the Constitution. As Adams tells it, though, disgrace, is averted by other means: the ineptitude of the British, the skill of the American artillerymen and privateers, and the diplomatic brilliance of Albert Gallatin and John Quincy Adams, who negotiated the peace treaty at Ghent. The history, full of reversals and paradoxes, ends with the largest irony of all: the United States, the apparent loser of the war, emerges as a great new world power destined to eclipse its European rivals.

LIBRARY OF AMERICA is an independent nonprofit cultural organization founded in 1979 to preserve our nation's literary heritage by publishing, and keeping permanently in print, America's best and most significant writing. The Library of America series includes more than 300 volumes to date, authoritative editions that average 1,000 pages in length, feature cloth covers, sewn bindings, and ribbon markers, and are printed on premium acid-free paper that will last for centuries.
The Papers of Ulysses S. Grant, Volume 11: June 1 - August 15, 1864
The Papers of Ulysses S. Grant, Volume 11
June 1 - August 15, 1864
Hardcover      ISBN: 0809311178

On June 2, 1864, Ulysses S. Grant post-poned until the following morning an assault on Confederate lines near Cold Harbor planned for that afternoon be-cause of delays in positioning troops. In the meantime, Confederate forces strengthened their lines, and the assault became a slaughter that haunted Grant for the rest of his life.

Thus began a summer of frustration for the general-in-chief of the U.S. Army. By failing to press their advantage, Major General William F. "Baldy" Smith and Major General Ambrose E. Burnside in a six-week period fumbled two genuine opportunities to defeat Lee's army. An-noyed by the constant calls of Major Generals William S. Rosecrans and Sam-uel R. Curtis for reinforcements in Missouri and Kansas, he wrote that "I am satisfied you would hear the same call if they were stationed in Maine." Confederate forces commanded by Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early again threatened Washington, forcing Grant to send two army corps to defend the capital and to push the invaders back into the Shenandoah Valley. The pressure took its toll on his health: migraine headaches followed such setbacks as the battle of the Crater.

Vol 11. Great condition.

Lives of the Signers of the Declaration of Independence
Lives of the Signers of the Declaration of Independence
Paperback      ISBN: 0925279455
The Civil War in Depth: History in 3-D/With Viewer
The Civil War in Depth
History in 3-D/With Viewer
Hardcover      ISBN: 0811813487

The first book to present the greatest photographs of the Civil War in the three-dimensional format in which they were originally taken and meant to be seen, The Civil War in Depth is a landmark contribution to both photographic history and the ever-popular study of the Southern rebellion. Author Bob Zeller resurrects a fascinating aspect of Civil War photography that has, until now, been largely forgotten, assembling more than 150 of the most compelling views of the war -- some of them well known in their one-dimensional form; all of them remarkable windows on another time. Complete with a stereoscopic viewer that unveils each image in glorious 3-D, The Civil War in Depth offers scenes that come to life in a way no two-dimensional photograph ever could. The remarkable collection includes the first war action photograph ever taken -- the shelling of Fort Sumter in 1863 -- as well as more than a dozen Civil War images never published until now. From the stoic face of Abraham Lincoln to the slave pens, prisons, wrecked battlefields, and devastated cities of the South, the war between the states has never been revealed with such astonishing clarity.

Lincoln's Men: How President Lincoln Became Father to an Army and a Nation
Lincoln's Men
How President Lincoln Became Father to an Army and a Nation
Paperback      ISBN: 0684862948

No American president has enjoyed as intimate a relationship with the soldiers in his army as did the man they called "Father Abraham." In Lincoln's Men, historian William C. Davis draws on thousands of unpublished letters and diaries -- the voices of the volunteers -- to tell the hidden story of how a new and untested president became "Father" throughout both the army and the North as a whole.
How did Lincoln inspire the faith and courage of so many shattered men, as they wandered the inferno of Shiloh or were entrenched in the siege of Vicksburg? Why did soldiers visiting Washington feel free to stroll into the White House as if it were their own home? In this through and authoritative work, Davis removes layers of mythmaking to recapture the real moods and feelings of an army facing one of history's bloodiest conflicts. Lincoln's Men casts a new light on our most famous president and on America's revolution -- on our country's father and its rebirth.

The Johnstown Flood
The Johnstown Flood
Paperback      ISBN: 0671207148

The stunning story of one of America's great disasters, a preventable tragedy of Gilded Age America, brilliantly told by master historian David McCullough.

At the end of the nineteenth century, Johnstown, Pennsylvania, was a booming coal-and-steel town filled with hardworking families striving for a piece of the nation's burgeoning industrial prosperity. In the mountains above Johnstown, an old earth dam had been hastily rebuilt to create a lake for an exclusive summer resort patronized by the tycoons of that same industrial prosperity, among them Andrew Carnegie, Henry Clay Frick, and Andrew Mellon. Despite repeated warnings of possible danger, nothing was done about the dam. Then came May 31, 1889, when the dam burst, sending a wall of water thundering down the mountain, smashing through Johnstown, and killing more than 2,000 people. It was a tragedy that became a national scandal.

Graced by David McCullough's remarkable gift for writing richly textured, sympathetic social history, The Johnstown Flood is an absorbing, classic portrait of life in nineteenth-century America, of overweening confidence, of energy, and of tragedy. It also offers a powerful historical lesson for our century and all times: the danger of assuming that because people are in positions of responsibility they are necessarily behaving responsibly.
William Cooper's Town: Power and Persuasion on the Frontier of the Early American Republic
William Cooper's Town
Power and Persuasion on the Frontier of the Early American Republic
Paperback      ISBN: 0679773002

William Cooper and James Fenimore Cooper, a father and son who embodied the contradictions that divided America in the early years of the Republic, are brought to life in this Pulitzer Prize-winning book.

William Cooper rose from humble origins to become a wealthy land speculator and U.S. congressman in what had until lately been the wilderness of upstate New York, but his high-handed style of governing resulted in his fall from power and political disgrace. His son James Fenimore Cooper became one of this country's first popular novelists with a book, The Pioneers, that tried to come to terms with his father's failure and imaginatively reclaim the estate he had lost.

In William Cooper's Town, Alan Taylor dramatizes the class between gentility and democracy that was one of the principal consequences of the American Revolution, a struggle that was waged both at the polls and on the pages of our national literature. Taylor shows how Americans resolved their revolution through the creation of new social reforms and new stories that evolved with the expansion of our frontier.