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Why We Left: Untold Stories and Songs of America's First Immigrants
Why We Left
Untold Stories and Songs of America's First Immigrants
Hardcover      ISBN: 0816681252


Joanna Brooks's ancestors were among the earliest waves of emigrants to leave England for North America. They lived hardscrabble lives for generations, eking out subsistence in one place after another as they moved forever westward in search of a new life. Why, Brooks wondered, did her people and countless other poor English subjects abandon their homeland to settle for such unremitting hardship? The question leads her on a journey into a largely obscured dimension of American history.


With her family's background as a point of departure, Brooks brings to light the harsh realities behind seventeenth- and eighteenth-century working-class English emigration--and dismantles the long-cherished idea that these immigrants were drawn to America as a land of opportunity. American folk ballads provide a wealth of clues to the catastrophic contexts that propelled early English emigration to the Americas. Brooks follows these songs back across the Atlantic to find histories of economic displacement, environmental destruction, and social betrayal at the heart of the early Anglo-American migrant experience. The folk ballad "Edward," for instance, reveals the role of deforestation in the dislocation and emigration of early Anglo-American peasant immigrants. "Two Sisters" discloses the profound social destabilization unleashed by the advent of luxury goods in England. "The Golden Vanity" shows how common men and women viewed their own disposable position in England's imperial project. And "The House Carpenter's Wife" offers insights into the impact of economic instability and the colonial enterprise on women.


From these ballads, tragic and heartrending, Brooks uncovers an archaeology of the worldviews of America's earliest immigrants, presenting a new and haunting historical perspective on the ancestors we thought we knew.

Posters Of The Canadian Pacific
Posters Of The Canadian Pacific
Hardcover      ISBN: 1552979172

Three hundred vintage advertising and promotional posters.

During the late nineteenth century and early twentieth century, the Canadian Pacific Railway Company (CPR) was widely hailed as "The World's Greatest Travel System." The Canadian Pacific transcontinental railroad spanned North America from the Atlantic to Pacific oceans. The company also operated luxury hotels and resorts, passenger ocean liners, cargo ships, and an airline.

To promote the company and Canada to the world, Canadian Pacific produced more than 2,500 stunning lithographic and silkscreen posters -- 1,000 of which were created in its own graphic studio.

Posters of the Canadian Pacific is a treasury of three hundred of the finest posters published by the company. They were displayed in Canadian Pacific offices and independent travel agencies worldwide from the 1880s until the 1970s. These posters enticed millions to visit and even settle in Canada.

The posters span the years 1883-1973 with special focus on the Art Deco style posters of the 1920s and '30s. They focus on travel and leisure -- activities on ski slopes, golf courses, beaches, and luxury resorts. Other posters feature Canadian Pacific ocean liners in exotic locations around the globe such as the West Indies, Rio, Hawaii and the Orient.

Posters of the Canadian Pacific will appeal to a wide audience including art lovers, history buffs and railroad enthusiasts.

North American F-86f Sabre: The Birth of a Modern Air Force
North American F-86f Sabre
The Birth of a Modern Air Force
Paperback      ISBN: 0764347586

The XP-86F took to the skies for the first time in October 1947. Essentially, it was the result of incorporating swept wings into North American Aviation's design for the NA-140. This is a detailed look at the Sabre and its use by the Spanish Air Force over its lifetime.

Montreal Metropolis, 1880-1930
Montreal Metropolis, 1880-1930
Paperback      ISBN: 0773759743
Northern Passage: American Vietnam War Resisters in Canada
Northern Passage
American Vietnam War Resisters in Canada
Hardcover      ISBN: 067400471x

More than 50,000 draft-age American men and women migrated to Canada during the Vietnam War, the largest political exodus from the United States since the American Revolution. How are we to understand this migration three decades later? Was their action simply a marginal, highly individualized spin-off of the American antiwar movement, or did it have its own lasting collective meaning?

John Hagan, himself a member of the exodus, searched declassified government files, consulted previously unopened resistance organization archives and contemporary oral histories, and interviewed American war resisters settled in Toronto to learn how they made the momentous decision. Canadian immigration officials at first blocked the entry of some resisters; then, under pressure from Canadian church and civil liberties groups, they fully opened the border, providing these Americans with the legal opportunity to oppose the Vietnam draft and military mobilization while beginning new lives in Canada. It was a turning point for Canada as well, an assertion of sovereignty in its post-World War II relationship with the United States.

Hagan describes the resisters' absorption through Toronto's emerging American ghetto in the late 1960s. For these Americans, the move was an intense and transformative experience. While some struggled for a comprehensive amnesty in the United States, others dedicated their lives to engagement with social and political issues in Canada. More than half of the draft and military resisters who fled to Canada thirty years ago remain there today. Most lead successful lives, have lost their sense of Americanness, and overwhelmingly identify themselves as Canadians.

The Great Halifax Explosion: A World War I Story of Treachery, Tragedy, and Extraordinary Heroism
The Great Halifax Explosion
A World War I Story of Treachery, Tragedy, and Extraordinary Heroism
Hardcover      ISBN: 0062666533

NATIONAL BESTSELLER - The riveting, tick-tock account of the largest manmade explosion in history prior to the atomic bomb, and the equally astonishing tales of survival and heroism that emerged from the ashes, from acclaimed New York Times bestselling author John U. Bacon

After steaming out of New York City on December 1, 1917, laden with a staggering three thousand tons of TNT and other explosives, the munitions ship Mont-Blanc fought its way up the Atlantic coast, through waters prowled by enemy U-boats. As it approached the lively port city of Halifax, Mont-Blanc's deadly cargo erupted with the force of 2.9 kilotons of TNT--the most powerful explosion ever visited on a human population, save for HIroshima and Nagasaki. Mont-Blanc was vaporized in one fifteenth of a second; a shockwave leveled the surrounding city. Next came a thirty-five-foot tsunami. Most astounding of all, however, were the incredible tales of survival and heroism that soon emerged from the rubble.

This is the unforgettable story told in John U. Bacon's The Great Halifax Explosion a ticktock account of fateful decisions that led to doom, the human faces of the blast's 11,000 casualties, and the equally moving individual stories of those who lived and selflessly threw themselves into urgent rescue work that saved thousands.

The shocking scale of the disaster stunned the world, dominating global headlines even amid the calamity of the First World War. Hours after the blast, Boston sent trains and ships filled with doctors, medicine, and money. The explosion would revolutionize pediatric medicine; transform U.S.-Canadian relations; and provide physicist J. Robert Oppenheimer, who studied the Halifax explosion closely when developing the atomic bomb, with history's only real-world case study demonstrating the lethal power of a weapon of mass destruction.

Mesmerizing and inspiring, Bacon's deeply-researched narrative brings to life the tragedy, brvery, and surprising afterlife of one of the most dramatic events of modern times.

The Extended Moment: Fifty Years of Collecting Photographs at the National Gallery of Canada
The Extended Moment
Fifty Years of Collecting Photographs at the National Gallery of Canada
Hardcover      ISBN: 8874398026

This lavish book showcases the superb photography collection of the National Gallery of Canada, created over the past 50 years. In 1967, when the collection was established, the photography market was in its infancy, allowing the acquisition of works by pioneers of the medium such as Charles N gre, William Henry Fox Talbot, Gustave Le Gray, and Roger Fenton, among others. Today the collection boasts an impressive array of works by world-renowned photographers.

Ann Thomas chronicles the formative years of the collection under its founding curator, James Borcoman. She discusses the role of influential figures in the world of collecting and curating photographs, offering an insider's view of how the key collections entered the museum over the years. John McElhone takes a more technical approach in discussing how the photographic process has evolved, and helps clarify issues related to image appearance and identification.

George Hunter's Canada: Iconic Images from Canada's Most Prolific Photographer
George Hunter's Canada
Iconic Images from Canada's Most Prolific Photographer
Hardcover      ISBN: 0228100011

One of three new titles in the Firefly Books-National Film Board of Canada partnership.

"My mission is to show Canadians, and the world, a little of our country. The more they see something of Canada's grandeur and diversity of its people, the more they will appreciate it. I will not rest a minute until my mission is accomplished." -- George Hunter, photographer

Nobody took more photos of 20th-century Canada than George Hunter. His photos are in atlases, textbooks, encyclopedias and magazines. They're in galleries, museums and public archives, on old postage stamps and currency.

Despite a 70-year career that saw Hunter cross Canada more than 100 times on photographic expeditions, he never achieved widespread fame or critical acclaim. Mostly this is because Hunter was a photographer for hire to commercial entities and the government. His assignments were, ultimately, to document progress.

Hunter's catalogue represents a chronology of postwar Canada, beginning with horse-drawn hay wagons and ending with modern semi trailers on multi-lane highways. He captured portraits of Canadians at work, and also became a pilot to further his career. His aerial shots of billowing smokestacks, open-pit mines, newly minted expressways and vast log booms dominate his portfolio, which to modern eyes is equal parts majestic and nostalgic. His is a portrait of a young country maturing into an industrial force; a landscape as shaped by the people.

For information on the National Film Board of Canada visit www.nfb.ca.

Who Discovered America?: The Untold History of the Peopling of the Americas
Who Discovered America?
The Untold History of the Peopling of the Americas
Hardcover      ISBN: 006223675x

Greatly expanding on his blockbuster 1421, distinguished historian Gavin Menzies uncovers the complete untold history of how mankind came to the Americas--offering new revelations and a radical rethinking of the accepted historical record in Who Discovered America?

The iconoclastic historian's magnum opus, Who Discovered America? calls into question our understanding of how the American continents were settled, shedding new light on the well-known "discoveries" of European explorers, including Christopher Columbus. In Who Discovered America? he combines meticulous research and an adventurer's spirit to reveal astounding new evidence of an ancient Asian seagoing tradition--most notably the Chinese--that dates as far back as 130,000 years ago.

Menzies offers a revolutionary new alternative to the "Beringia" theory of how humans crossed a land bridge connecting Asia and North America during the last Ice Age, and provides a wealth of staggering claims, that hold fascinating and astonishing implications for the history of mankind.

The Lost Treasure of the Knights Templar: Solving the Oak Island Mystery
The Lost Treasure of the Knights Templar
Solving the Oak Island Mystery
Paperback      ISBN: 0892817100

A compelling argument that connects the lost treasure of the Knights Templar to the mysterious money pit on Oak Island, Nova Scotia, that has baffled treasure hunters for two centuries

- Fascinating occult detective work linking the Cathars, the Scottish Masons, and Renne-le-Chateau to the elusive treasure pit on Oak Island

- Draws on new evidence recently unearthed in Italy, France, and Scotland to provide a compelling solution to one of the world's most enduring mysteries

When the Order of Knights Templar was ruthlessly dissolved in 1307 by King Philip the Fair of France it possessed immense wealth and political power, yet none of the treasure the Templars amassed has ever been found. Their treasure is rumored to contain artifacts of spiritual significance retrieved by the order during the Crusades, including the genealogies of David and Jesus and documents that trace these bloodlines into the royal bloodlines of Merovingian France.

Placing a Scottish presence in the New World a century before Columbus, Steven Sora paints a credible scenario that the Sinclair clan of Scotland transported the wealth of the Templars--entrusted to them as the Masonic heirs of the order--to a remote island off the shores of present-day Nova Scotia. The mysterious money pit there is commonly believed to have been built before 1497 and has guarded its secret contents tenaciously despite two centuries of determined efforts to unearth it. All of these efforts (one even financed by American president Franklin Delano Roosevelt) have failed, thanks to an elaborate system of booby traps, false beaches, hidden drains, and other hazards of remarkable ingenuity and technological complexity.