United States Civil War
Featured Items
April 1865: The Month That Saved America
April 1865
The Month That Saved America
Paperback      ISBN: 0060930888
The author reveals why the last month of the American Civil War was so pivotal in preserving the Union, describing such key events as the fall of Richmond, Lee's retreat, the surrender at Appomattox, and Lincoln's assassination. Reprint.
All for the Union: The Civil War Diary and Letters of Elisha Hunt Rhodes
All for the Union
The Civil War Diary and Letters of Elisha Hunt Rhodes
Paperback      ISBN: 0679738282
The journal of a Union soldier describes battles and events
Sherman: A Soldier's Life
Sherman
A Soldier's Life
Paperback      ISBN: 0060930748
A noted military historian provides an intriguing new portrait of the Civil War general that examines in depth his life and career, from his formative years at West Point, to his controversial campaigns during the Civil War, to his role as a postwar commander. Reprint.
For Cause and Comrades: Why Men Fought in the Civil War
For Cause and Comrades
Why Men Fought in the Civil War
Paperback      ISBN: 0195124995
General John A. Wickham, commander of the famous 101st Airborne Division in the 1970s and subsequently Army Chief of Staff, once visited Antietam battlefield. Gazing at Bloody Lane where, in 1862, several Union assaults were brutally repulsed before they finally broke through, he marveled, "You couldn't get American soldiers today to make an attack like that." Why did those men risk certain death, over and over again, through countless bloody battles and four long, awful years ? Why did the conventional wisdom -- that soldiers become increasingly cynical and disillusioned as war progresses -- not hold true in the Civil War? It is to this question--why did they fight--that James McPherson, America's preeminent Civil War historian, now turns his attention. He shows that, contrary to what many scholars believe, the soldiers of the Civil War remained powerfully convinced of the ideals for which they fought throughout the conflict. Motivated by duty and honor, and often by religious faith, these men wrote frequently of their firm belief in the cause for which they fought: the principles of liberty, freedom, justice, and patriotism. Soldiers on both sides harkened back to the Founding Fathers, and the ideals of the American Revolution. They fought to defend their country, either the Union--"the best Government ever made"--or the Confederate states, where their very homes and families were under siege. And they fought to defend their honor and manhood. "I should not lik to go home with the name of a couhard," one Massachusetts private wrote, and another private from Ohio said, "My wife would sooner hear of my death than my disgrace." Even after three years of bloody battles, more than half of the Union soldiers reenlisted voluntarily. "While duty calls me here and my country demands my services I should be willing to make the sacrifice," one man wrote to his protesting parents. And another soldier said simply, "I still love my country." McPherson draws on more than 25,000 letters and nearly 250 private diaries from men on both sides. Civil War soldiers were among the most literate soldiers in history, and most of them wrote home frequently, as it was the only way for them to keep in touch with homes that many of them had left for the first time in their lives. Significantly, their letters were also uncensored by military authorities, and are uniquely frank in their criticism and detailed in their reports of marches and battles, relations between officers and men, political debates, and morale. For Cause and Comrades lets these soldiers tell their own stories in their own words to create an account that is both deeply moving and far truer than most books on war. Battle Cry of Freedom, McPherson's Pulitzer Prize-winning account of the Civil War, was a national bestseller that Hugh Brogan, in The New York Times, called "history writing of the highest order." For Cause and Comrades deserves similar accolades, as McPherson's masterful prose and the soldiers' own words combine to create both an important book on an often-overlooked aspect of our bloody Civil War, and a powerfully moving account of the men who fought it.
Photographic History of the Civil War: The Opening Battles
Photographic History of the Civil War
The Opening Battles
Hardcover      ISBN: 1555211747
Documents the early campaigns of the Civil War with photographs of soldiers, officers, and battlefields
Robert E. Lee: A Penguin Life
Robert E. Lee
A Penguin Life
Hardcover      ISBN: 0670032204
A portrait of the Civil War leader delves into his family history and personality to reveal the human behind the general, documenting how the lessons he learned from his elders were applied on the battlefield. 30,000 first printing.
Personal Memoirs of U.S. Grant
Personal Memoirs of U.S. Grant
Paperback      ISBN: 0306801728
A portrait of Grant's public and private life depicts his childhood in Ohio, military career, and experiences in the Civil War
The Civil War
The Civil War
Paperback      ISBN: 0618001875
Period prints, photographs, and documents accompany this penetrating examination of the political, military, and social aspects of the War Between the States, tracing the conflict from the earliest divisions between North and South to the final surrender of Confederate troops and its aftermath. Reprint.
April 1865: The Month That Saved America
April 1865
The Month That Saved America
1st Edition    Hardcover      ISBN: 0060187239
The author reveals why the last month of the American Civil War was so pivotal in preserving the Union, describing such key events as the fall of Richmond, Lee's retreat, the surrender at Appomattox, and Lincoln's assassination. 30,000 first printing.
Lincoln's Men: How President Lincoln Became Father to an Army and a Nation
Lincoln's Men
How President Lincoln Became Father to an Army and a Nation
Paperback      ISBN: 0684862948
No American president has enjoyed as intimate a relationship with the soldiers in his army as did the man they called "Father Abraham." In Lincoln's Men, historian William C. Davis draws on thousands of unpublished letters and diaries -- the voices of the volunteers -- to tell the hidden story of how a new and untested president became "Father" throughout both the army and the North as a whole. How did Lincoln inspire the faith and courage of so many shattered men, as they wandered the inferno of Shiloh or were entrenched in the siege of Vicksburg? Why did soldiers visiting Washington feel free to stroll into the White House as if it were their own home? In this through and authoritative work, Davis removes layers of mythmaking to recapture the real moods and feelings of an army facing one of history's bloodiest conflicts. Lincoln's Men casts a new light on our most famous president and on America's revolution -- on our country's father and its rebirth.