South America
The 33: Deep Down Dark: the Untold Stories of 33 Men Buried in a Chilean Mine, and the Miracle That Set Them Free
The 33
Deep Down Dark: the Untold Stories of 33 Men Buried in a Chilean Mine, and the Miracle That Set Them Free
Paperback      ISBN: 1250088941
Includes New Material Exclusive to the Paperback A Finalist for a National Book Critics Circle Award A Finalist for a Los Angeles Times Book Prize A New York Times Book Review Notable Book Selected for NPR's Morning Edition Book Club When the San José mine collapsed outside of Copiapó, Chile, in August 2010, it trapped thirty-three miners beneath thousands of feet of rock for a record-breaking sixty-nine days. After the disaster, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Héctor Tobar received exclusive access to the miners and their tales, and in Deep Down Dark, he brings them to haunting, visceral life. We learn what it was like to be imprisoned inside a mountain, understand the horror of being slowly consumed by hunger, and experience the awe of working in such a place-underground passages filled with danger and that often felt alive. A masterwork of narrative journalism and a stirring testament to the power of the human spirit,Deep Down Dark captures the profound ways in which the lives of everyone involved in the catastrophe were forever changed.
Alive
Alive
Paperback      ISBN: 038000321x
Records the struggles and sufferings of the young Uruguayans as they battled for survival during the ten weeks following an airplane crash in the Andes, in a volume that inludes a new introduction by the author. Reissue.
Amexica: War Along the Borderline
Amexica
War Along the Borderline
Paperback      ISBN: 0312610610
With a New Afterword In 2009, Ed Vulliamy traveled two thousand miles along the frontier from the Pacific coast to the Gulf of Mexico, and from Tijuana to Matamoros, a journey through a kaleidoscopic landscape of corruption and all-out civil war. He describes in revelatory detail the dreaded narco gangs; the smuggling of people, weapons, and illegal drugs; and the interrelated economies of drugs and the ruthless, systematic murder of young women in Ciudad Juarez. Amexica takes us far beyond today’s headlines. It is a street-level portrait, by turns horrific and sublime, of a place and people in a time of war as much as of the war itself, “an impressively rendered, nightmare-inducing account” (Kirkus Reviews, Top 25 Books of 2010).
The Ancient Kingdoms of Peru
The Ancient Kingdoms of Peru
Paperback      ISBN: 0140233814
This essential book draws on the evidence of recent excavations of Peruvian sites in a remarkable survey of the civilizations which preceded the Incas. As recently as 1987, robbers discovered by far the most spectacular vestiges of the Moche people, who ruled much of Peru for the first six centuries of the Christian era. This find—a royal burial chamber shoulder-deep in gold and silver ornaments and carvings studded with jewels—has provided many powerful insights into their way of life, as Nigel Davies shows. Patterns representing a condor, a killer whale and even an 80-meter monkey, visible only from the air, are etched into a bare expanse of desert at Nazca. Davies analyzes and assesses the latest scholarly theories surrounding one of the world's great enigmas. He then turns to the key power centers of the 'middle period' in Huari and Tiahuanaco, the great coastal civilization of Chimor (the first for which we have written accounts), and its eventual defeat by the Incas around 1470 AD. Alongside the often biased conquistador chronicles, archaeology can now illuminate the Inca imperial cult, their methods of agriculture, road-building, town-planning and settlement. In this lively and compelling overview, Davies makes accessible the latest research on all these ancient kingdoms of Peru.
The Argentina Reader: History, Culture, Politics
The Argentina Reader
History, Culture, Politics
Paperback      ISBN: 082232914x
An interdisciplinary anthology that includes many primary materials never before published in English.
The Awakening of Latin America: A Classic Anthology of Che Guevara's Writing on Latin America
The Awakening of Latin America
A Classic Anthology of Che Guevara's Writing on Latin America
Paperback      ISBN: 0980429285
The name Che Guevara is synonymous with Latin America. This classic anthology on Latin America shows his cultural depth, rigorous intellect, and intense emotion. Selected from Che's personal family archives by a leading authority on Che Guevara's life and work, this includes the best of Che's writing: examples of his journalism, essays, speeches, letters, and poems, revealing his transformation from the impressionable medical student to his death as "the heroic guerrilla" in Bolivia. Nearly half of this book is published for the first time and most of these pieces pre-date Che's arrival in Cuba with Fidel Castro's guerrilla expedition in 1956. It opens with excerpts from Che's unpublished "Bicycle Diaries," his notes from a trip around Argentina on a bicycle in 1950, the year before The Motorcycle Diaries. It features unpublished poems including "To the Bolivian Miners," "My Tears for You Guatemala," and "Spain in America"; unpublished articles including "Machu-Picchu: Enigmatic Stone of America," "View from the Bank of the Greatest of Rivers," and "Workers of the United States: Friends or Enemies?" as well as fascinating notes from the reading and study program he set himself. Also included are his notes for his unpublished book, The Social Role of Doctors in Latin America. This is the book to read after The Motorcycle Diaries and his final Bolivian Diary to discover the evolution of an extraordinary mind and individual. This anthology on Latin America is destined to become an instant classic comparable to Eduardo Galeano's Open Veins of Latin America.

Backlands: The Canudos Campaign
Backlands
The Canudos Campaign
Paperback      ISBN: 0143106074
Written by a former army lieutenant, civil engineer, and journalist, Backlands: The Canudos Campaign, is Euclides da Cunha's vivid and poignant portrayal of Brazil's infamous War of Canudos. The deadliest civil war in Brazilian history, the conflict during the 1890s was between the government and the village of Canudos, in the northeastern state of Bahia, settled by 30,000 followers of the religious zealot Antonio Conselheiro. Far from just an objective retelling, da Cunha's story shows both the significance of this event and the complexities of Brazilian society. Featuring a new translation by Elizabeth Lowe, and an introduction by Ilan Stavans, one of Latin America's foremost scholars, this is sure to remain one of the best chronicles of war ever penned.
Behind the Disappearances: Argentina's Dirty War Against Human Rights and the United Nations
Behind the Disappearances
Argentina's Dirty War Against Human Rights and the United Nations
Paperback      ISBN: 0812213130
Drawing on confidential Argentinian documents and memoranda, Behind the Disappearances documents a seven-year diplomatic war by one of the twentieth century's most brutal regimes. It relates how, starting in 1976, Argentina's military government tried to cripple the UN's human rights machinery in an effort to prevent international condemnation of its policy of disappearances. Initially this attempt succeeded, but in 1980—with encouragement from the Carter administration—UN officials regained the initiative and created a special working group on disappearances that rejuvenated the UN's efforts. This progress was abruptly halted in 1981 when the Reagan administration sided with the Argentinian regime. The result, claims the author, not only undercut the UN's actions against disappearances but also weakened its chances of playing a positive role in aiding Latin America's transition from dictatorship to democracy.

Beyond Papillon: The French Overseas Penal Colonies, 1854–1952
Beyond Papillon
The French Overseas Penal Colonies, 1854–1952
Hardcover      ISBN: 0803244495
For French criminologists and colonialists of the mid-nineteenth century, the penal colonies of Guiana and New Caledonia seemed to satisfy two needs, namely, to incarcerate a growing number of criminals and to supply manpower for these developing colonies. But were these two goals not contradictory? Was the primary purpose of the penal colonies to punish or to colonize? In the prisons, inmates found means of subversion, guards resisted militaristic discipline, and camp commanders fought physicians for authority. Back in the metropole, journalistic expos catered to the public’s fascination with the penal colonies’ horror and exoticism. An understanding of modern France is not complete without an examination of this institution, which existed for more than a century and imprisoned more than one hundred thousand people. Stephen A. Toth invites readers to experience the prisons firsthand. Through a careful analysis of criminal case files, administrative records, and prisoner biographies, Toth reconstructs life in the penal colonies and examines how the social sciences, tropical medicine, and sensational journalism evaluated and exploited the inmates’ experiences. In exploring the disjuncture between the real and the imagined, he moves beyond mythic characterizations of the penal colonies to reveal how power, discipline, and punishment were construed and enforced in these prison outposts.
Bitter Fruit: The Untold Story of the American Coup in Guatemala
Bitter Fruit
The Untold Story of the American Coup in Guatemala
Paperback      ISBN: 0385183542