Immigration and Refugee Studies
Featured Items
Norwegian Newspapers in America: Connecting Norway and the New Land
Norwegian Newspapers in America
Connecting Norway and the New Land
Paperback      ISBN: 0873517725

In the nineteenth century, the United States, "the land of newspapers," was also fast becoming the land of immigrants, with increasing numbers of Norwegians arriving amid the European influx. Already Skandinaven, published out of Chicago, kept newcomers and their Old World friends and family informed of political, religious, and social matters discussed in burgeoning Norwegian American communities.

From 1847 to today, more than 280 Norwegian-language papers were launched in cities ranging from Minneapolis to Fargo, Boston to Seattle. Some lasted just a few months; others continued for decades; all contributed to a developing Norwegian- American perspective. Odd Lovoll traces newspaper ventures both successful and short lived to offer a comprehensive look at America's Norwegian-language press. Highlighting diligent editors and analyzing topics of interest to readers through the years, Norwegian Newspapers in America demonstrates how newspapers pursued a twofold goal: forging a bridge to the homeland while nurturing cultural practices in the New World.

Part of the Family?: Nannies, Housekeepers, Caregivers and the Battle for Domestic Workers' Rights
Part of the Family?
Nannies, Housekeepers, Caregivers and the Battle for Domestic Workers' Rights
Paperback      ISBN: 1935439855

Love and compassion are at the heart of domestic labor, yet historically, domestic workers have been rendered invisible--by society and in the eyes of the law. Mostly foreign-born women, these workers have been excluded from labor protections that workers in the rest of the economy take for granted. However, in the past decade, a growing movement has emerged calling for domestic workers to share in the same rights guaranteed other workers, which is likely to lead to one of the most critical and encompassing labor battles of the twenty-first century.

Part of the Family? Nannies, Housekeepers, Caregivers and the Battle for Domestic Workers' Rights chronicles the rising political and social movement to secure labor protections for domestic workers who toil in our homes cleaning, cooking, and caring for our children and elders. Through interviews with the leaders and activists who are forging new and unlikely political alliances among workers, employers, policymakers and other social justice movements, as well as analysis of the historical underpinnings of the current fight for improved conditions and protections for domestic workers, this important and timely book will shine an overdue light on the invisible laborers who are so critical to our economy (and our families).


The Spirit Catches You & You Fall Down: A Hmong Child, Her American Doctors & the Collision of Two Cultures, Reader's Guide
The Spirit Catches You & You Fall Down
A Hmong Child, Her American Doctors & the Collision of Two Cultures, Reader's Guide
Paperback      ISBN: 0374525641

Winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award for Nonfiction
When three-month-old Lia Lee Arrived at the county hospital emergency room in Merced, California, a chain of events was set in motion from which neither she nor her parents nor her doctors would ever recover. Lia's parents, Foua and Nao Kao, were part of a large Hmong community in Merced, refugees from the CIA-run "Quiet War" in Laos. The Hmong, traditionally a close-knit and fiercely people, have been less amenable to assimilation than most immigrants, adhering steadfastly to the rituals and beliefs of their ancestors. Lia's pediatricians, Neil Ernst and his wife, Peggy Philip, cleaved just as strongly to another tradition: that of Western medicine. When Lia Lee Entered the American medical system, diagnosed as an epileptic, her story became a tragic case history of cultural miscommunication.
Parents and doctors both wanted the best for Lia, but their ideas about the causes of her illness and its treatment could hardly have been more different. The Hmong see illness aand healing as spiritual matters linked to virtually everything in the universe, while medical community marks a division between body and soul, and concerns itself almost exclusively with the former. Lia's doctors ascribed her seizures to the misfiring of her cerebral neurons; her parents called her illness, "qaug dab peg"--the spirit catches you and you fall down--and ascribed it to the wandering of her soul. The doctors prescribed anticonvulsants; her parents preferred animal sacrifices.

Latino Americans: The 500-Year Legacy That Shaped a Nation
Latino Americans
The 500-Year Legacy That Shaped a Nation
Compact Disc      ISBN: 1622312546

As the largest minority in the country, Latino Americans make up an integral part of American history and continue to make major social, cultural, and political contributions. Latino Americans shares their story, revealing the personal struggles and successes of immigrants, poets, soldiers, and others who have made an impact on history.Author and acclaimed journalist Ray Suarez explores the lives of Latino American men and women across a five-hundred-year span, encompassing an epic range of experiences from the early European settlements to Manifest Destiny; the Wild West to the Cold War; the Great Depression to Globalization; and the Spanish-American War to the Civil Rights movement.

Norway to America: A Histry of Migration
Norway to America
A Histry of Migration
Hardcover      ISBN: 0816608423
No One Is Illegal: Fighting Racism and State Violence on the U.S.-Mexico Border
No One Is Illegal
Fighting Racism and State Violence on the U.S.-Mexico Border
Paperback      ISBN: 1931859353

"A rare combination of an author, Mike Davis is] Rachel Carson and Upton Sinclair all in one."--Susan Faludi

" Davis' writing is] perceptive and rigorous."--David Montgomery, The Nation

" Davis' work is] brilliant, provocative, and exhaustively researched."--The Village Voice

" Davis' work is] eloquent and passionate."--Tariq Ali

No One Is Illegal debunks the leading ideas behind the often violent right-wing backlash against immigrants.

Countering the chorus of anti-immigrant voices, Mike Davis and Justin Akers Chac n expose the racism of anti-immigration vigilantes and put a human face on the immigrants who risk their lives to cross the border to work in the United States.

Davis and Akers Chac n challenge the racist politics of vigilante groups like the Minutemen, and argue for a pro-immigrant and pro-worker agenda that recognizes the urgent need for international solidarity and cross-border alliances in building a renewed labor movement.

Writer, historian, and activist Mike Davis is the author of many books, including City of Quartz, The Ecology of Fear, The Monster at Our Door, and Planet of Slums. Davis teaches in the Department of History at the University of California at Irvine, and lives in San Diego. Davis is the recipient of the 2001 Carey McWilliams Award and the World History Association Book Award.

Justin Akers Chac n is professor of U.S. History and Chicano Studies in San Diego, California. He has contributed to the International Socialist Review and the book Immigration: Opposing Viewpoints (Greenhaven Press).

The Devil's Highway: A True Story
The Devil's Highway
A True Story
Paperback      ISBN: 0316010804
From a Pulitzer Prize finalist, the single most compelling, lucid, and lyrical contemporary account of the absurdity of U.S. border policy (The Atlantic).

In May 2001, a group of men attempted to cross the Mexican border into the desert of southern Arizona, through the deadliest region of the continent, the Devil's Highway. Three years later, Luis Alberto Urrea wrote about what happened to them. The result was a national bestseller, a Pulitzer Prize finalist, a book of the year in multiple newspapers, and a work proclaimed as a modern American classic.
Calculated Kindness: Refugees and America's Half-Open Door, 1945 to the Present
Calculated Kindness
Refugees and America's Half-Open Door, 1945 to the Present
Paperback      ISBN: 0684863839

"Powerful . . . well-documented, well-written, and most informative, ("Calculated Kindness") is . . . for all Americans who wish to better understand the often competing policies and principles that have regulated immigrations practices in the United States."--(Rev.) Theodore M. Hesburgh, C.S.C., President, University of Notre Dame.

Bury Me Standing: The Gypsies and Their Journey
Bury Me Standing
The Gypsies and Their Journey
Paperback      ISBN: 067973743x

A masterful work of personal reportage, this volume is also a vibrant portrait of a mysterious people and an essential document of a disappearing culture.

Fabled, feared, romanticized, and reviled, the Gypsies--or Roma--are among the least understood people on earth. Their culture remains largely obscure, but in Isabel Fonseca they have found an eloquent witness.

In Bury Me Standing, alongside unforgettable portraits of individuals--the poet, the politician, the child prostitute--Fonseca offers sharp insights into the humor, language, wisdom, and taboos of the Roma. She traces their exodus out of India 1,000 years ago and their astonishing history of persecution: enslaved by the princes of medieval Romania; massacred by the Nazis; forcibly assimilated by the communist regimes; evicted from their settlements in Eastern Europe, and most recently, in Western Europe as well. Whether as handy scapegoats or figments of the romantic imagination, the Gypsies have always been with us--but never before have they been brought so vividly to life.

Includes fifty black and white photos.
Home Bound: Filipino American Lives Across Cultures, Communities, and Countries
Home Bound
Filipino American Lives Across Cultures, Communities, and Countries
Paperback      ISBN: 0520235274

Filipino Americans, who experience life in the United States as immigrants, colonized nationals, and racial minorities, have been little studied, though they are one of our largest immigrant groups. Based on her in-depth interviews with more than one hundred Filipinos in San Diego, California, Yen Le Espiritu investigates how Filipino women and men are transformed through the experience of migration, and how they in turn remake the social world around them. Her sensitive analysis reveals that Filipino Americans confront U.S. domestic racism and global power structures by living transnational lives that are shaped as much by literal and symbolic ties to the Philippines as they are by social, economic, and political realities in the United States.

Espiritu deftly weaves vivid first-person narratives with larger social and historical contexts as she discovers the meaning of home, community, gender, and intergenerational relations among Filipinos. Among other topics, she explores the ways that female sexuality is defined in contradistinction to American mores and shows how this process becomes a way of opposing racial subjugation in this country. She also examines how Filipinos have integrated themselves into the American workplace and looks closely at the effects of colonialism.