Immigration and Refugee Studies
Featured Items
Romulus, My Father
Romulus, My Father
Hardcover      ISBN: 1921351926

A powerful, best-selling memoir about the relationship between a father and son. Adapted as an award-winning film starring Eric Bana ("Hulk"), loved by readers and lauded by critics, "Romulus, My Father" is about how one compassionate and honest man taught his son the meaning of living a decent life.

We Carry Our Homes with Us: A Cuban American Memoir
We Carry Our Homes with Us
A Cuban American Memoir
Paperback      ISBN: 1681340062

On December 30, 1960, Marisella Veiga with her mother and two brothers boarded a plane from Havana to Miami. Her father fled a few months later, joining his family with a total of fourteen U.S. cents in his pocket and an understanding that he would never see his homeland again. Seeking a less competitive job market and thanks largely to the sponsorship of a host family in St. Paul, the Veigas resettled in Minnesota, miles away from the Caribbean subtropics, where the climate was similar to home, Spanish was spoken, and thousands of exiles arrived each month.

Veiga's stories are rich with detail and character as she describes her integration into a northern midwestern landscape she grew to love, from adapting to the cold--learning to ice-skate before learning to speak English--to her obsession with Davy Jones. Yet, the weight of her biculturalism--being of two worlds but an outsider to both--has been central to her quest for identity: "Sometimes, I dream that if I can get in touch with the essence of that monolingual child with one set of customs, I would be satisfied. I would be complete, whole." In this honest memoir, readers will find a resonant story of an exile's journey, one that ultimately embraces those two worlds: a life of conflict and limbo but also one of richness and understanding.

What Have the Immigrants Ever Done for Us?
What Have the Immigrants Ever Done for Us?
Hardcover      ISBN: 1849548412

Kelvin MacKenzie, once editor of a populist anti-immigrant newspaper, makes the case for welcoming immigration as an asset to the UK, both socially and economically, and argues against the increasingly hysterical anti-migration lobby which has emerged in Britain.

Kelvin MacKenzie is a newspaper editor, broadcaster and media commentator.

The Spirit Catches You & You Fall Down: A Hmong Child, Her American Doctors & the Collision of Two Cultures, Reader's Guide
The Spirit Catches You & You Fall Down
A Hmong Child, Her American Doctors & the Collision of Two Cultures, Reader's Guide
Paperback      ISBN: 0374525641

Winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award for Nonfiction
When three-month-old Lia Lee Arrived at the county hospital emergency room in Merced, California, a chain of events was set in motion from which neither she nor her parents nor her doctors would ever recover. Lia's parents, Foua and Nao Kao, were part of a large Hmong community in Merced, refugees from the CIA-run "Quiet War" in Laos. The Hmong, traditionally a close-knit and fiercely people, have been less amenable to assimilation than most immigrants, adhering steadfastly to the rituals and beliefs of their ancestors. Lia's pediatricians, Neil Ernst and his wife, Peggy Philip, cleaved just as strongly to another tradition: that of Western medicine. When Lia Lee Entered the American medical system, diagnosed as an epileptic, her story became a tragic case history of cultural miscommunication.
Parents and doctors both wanted the best for Lia, but their ideas about the causes of her illness and its treatment could hardly have been more different. The Hmong see illness aand healing as spiritual matters linked to virtually everything in the universe, while medical community marks a division between body and soul, and concerns itself almost exclusively with the former. Lia's doctors ascribed her seizures to the misfiring of her cerebral neurons; her parents called her illness, "qaug dab peg"--the spirit catches you and you fall down--and ascribed it to the wandering of her soul. The doctors prescribed anticonvulsants; her parents preferred animal sacrifices.

Immigration Nation: Raids, Detentions, and Deportations in Post-9/11 America
Immigration Nation
Raids, Detentions, and Deportations in Post-9/11 America
Paperback      ISBN: 1594518386

In the wake of September 11, 2001, the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) was created to prevent terrorist attacks in the US.This led to dramatic increases in immigration law enforcement - raids, detentions and deportations have increased six-fold. Immigration Nation critically analyses the human rights impact of this tightening of US immigration policy. Golash-Boza reveals that it has had consequences not just for immigrants, but for citizens, families and communities. She shows that even though family reunification is officially a core component of US immigration policy, it has often torn families apart. This is a critical and revealing look at the real life - frequently devastating - impact of immigration policy in a security conscious world.

Latino Americans: The 500-Year Legacy That Shaped a Nation
Latino Americans
The 500-Year Legacy That Shaped a Nation
Compact Disc      ISBN: 1622312546

As the largest minority in the country, Latino Americans make up an integral part of American history and continue to make major social, cultural, and political contributions. Latino Americans shares their story, revealing the personal struggles and successes of immigrants, poets, soldiers, and others who have made an impact on history.Author and acclaimed journalist Ray Suarez explores the lives of Latino American men and women across a five-hundred-year span, encompassing an epic range of experiences from the early European settlements to Manifest Destiny; the Wild West to the Cold War; the Great Depression to Globalization; and the Spanish-American War to the Civil Rights movement.

The Warmth of Other Suns: The Epic Story of America's Great Migration
The Warmth of Other Suns
The Epic Story of America's Great Migration
Paperback      ISBN: 0679763880
In this epic, beautifully written masterwork, Pulitzer Prize-winning author Isabel Wilkerson chronicles one of the great untold stories of American history: the decades-long migration of black citizens who fled the South for northern and western cities, in search of a better life.

NATIONAL BOOK CRITICS CIRCLE AWARD WINNER

From 1915 to 1970, this exodus of almost six million people changed the face of America. Wilkerson compares this epic migration to the migrations of other peoples in history. She interviewed more than a thousand people, and gained access to new data and official records, to write this definitive and vividly dramatic account of how these American journeys unfolded, altering our cities, our country, and ourselves.

With stunning historical detail, Wilkerson tells this story through the lives of three unique individuals: Ida Mae Gladney, who in 1937 left sharecropping and prejudice in Mississippi for Chicago, where she achieved quiet blue-collar success and, in old age, voted for Barack Obama when he ran for an Illinois Senate seat; sharp and quick-tempered George Starling, who in 1945 fled Florida for Harlem, where he endangered his job fighting for civil rights, saw his family fall, and finally found peace in God; and Robert Foster, who left Louisiana in 1953 to pursue a medical career, the personal physician to Ray Charles as part of a glitteringly successful medical career, which allowed him to purchase a grand home where he often threw exuberant parties.

Wilkerson brilliantly captures their first treacherous and exhausting cross-country trips by car and train and their new lives in colonies that grew into ghettos, as well as how they changed these cities with southern food, faith, and culture and improved them with discipline, drive, and hard work. Both a riveting microcosm and a major assessment, The Warmth of Other Suns is a bold, remarkable, and riveting work, a superb account of an "unrecognized immigration" within our own land. Through the breadth of its narrative, the beauty of the writing, the depth of its research, and the fullness of the people and lives portrayed herein, this book is destined to become a classic.

MARK LYNTON HISTORY PRIZE WINNER
HEARTLAND AWARD WINNER
DAYTON LITERARY PEACE PRIZE FINALIST

NAMED ONE OF THE TEN BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY
The New York Times - USA Today - O: The Oprah Magazine - Amazon - Publishers Weekly - Salon - Newsday - The Daily Beast


NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY
The New Yorker - The Washington Post - The Economist - Boston Globe - San Francisco Chronicle - Chicago Tribune - Entertainment Weekly - Philadelphia Inquirer - The Guardian - The Seattle Times - St. Louis Post-Dispatch - The Christian Science Monitor
Crossing over: A Mexican Family on the Migrant Trail
Crossing over
A Mexican Family on the Migrant Trail
Paperback      ISBN: 0312421230

The U.S.-Mexican border is one of the most permeable boundaries in the world, breached daily by Mexicans in search of work. Thousands die crossing the line and those who reach "the other side" are branded illegals, undocumented and unprotected. "Crossing Over" puts a human face on the phenomenon, following the exodus of the Chavez clan, an extended Mexican family who lost three sons in a tragic border accident. Martinez follows the migrants' progress from their small southern Mexican town of Cheran to California, Wisconsin, and Missouri where far from joining the melting pot, Martinez argues, the seven million migrants in the U.S. are creating a new culture that will alter both Mexico and the United States as the two countries come increasingly to resemble each other."

Arguing Immigration: The Controversy and Crisis Over the Future of Immigration in America
Arguing Immigration
The Controversy and Crisis Over the Future of Immigration in America
Paperback      ISBN: 0671895583

Essays examine the immigration policies of the United States and look at how permissive policies have affected the nation

Children of the City: At Work and at Play
Children of the City
At Work and at Play
Paperback      ISBN: 0345802977

The turn of the twentieth century was a time of explosive growth for American cities, a time of nascent hopes and apparently limitless possibilities. In Children of the City, David Nasaw re-creates this period in our social history from the vantage point of the children who grew up then. Drawing on hundreds of memoirs, autobiographies, oral histories and unpublished--and until now unexamined--primary source materials from cities across the country, he provides us with a warm and eloquent portrait of these children, their families, their daily lives, their fears, and their dreams.

Illustrated with 68 photographs from the period, many never before published, Children of the City offers a vibrant portrait of a time when our cities and our grandparents were young.