Racism and Ethnic Studies
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The Other Side of the River: A Story of Two Towns, a Death, and America's Dilemma
The Other Side of the River
A Story of Two Towns, a Death, and America's Dilemma
Paperback      ISBN: 038547721x

Bestselling author Alex Kotlowitz is one of this country's foremost writers on the ever explosive issue of race. In this gripping and ultimately profound book, Kotlowitz takes us to two towns in southern Michigan, St. Joseph and Benton Harbor, separated by the St. Joseph River. Geographically close, but worlds apart, they are a living metaphor for America's racial divisions: St. Joseph is a prosperous lakeshore community and ninety-five percent white, while Benton Harbor is impoverished and ninety-two percent black. When the body of a black teenaged boy from Benton Harbor is found in the river, unhealed wounds and suspicions between the two towns' populations surface as well. The investigation into the young man's death becomes, inevitably, a screen on which each town projects their resentments and fears. The Other Side of the River sensitively portrays the lives and hopes of the towns' citizens as they wrestle with this mystery--and reveals the attitudes and misperceptions that undermine race relations throughout America.

Homage to Chiapas: The New Indigenous Struggles in Mexico
Homage to Chiapas
The New Indigenous Struggles in Mexico
Paperback      ISBN: 1859843727

The new Zapatistas in Chiapas have served as a catalyst for revolutionary indigenous movements across Mexico, pioneering a new model of resistance and posing a powerful threat to the stability of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). Homage to Chiapas vividly depicts the grassroots struggles for land and local autonomy now underway in an economically strategic nation of nearly 100 million people. Weinberg analyzes NAFTA's impact on Mexico's campesinos with on-the-spot reportage from Tabasco, where fishermen blockade state owned oil wells to protest local pollution, from Central Mexico where plans for a giant computer complex and golf course spark an Indian uprising, as well as from Chiapas where he interviews Sub-commander Marcos. He also examines Mexico's growing militarization in the name of the war on drugs and reviews the Zapatistas' challenge to their supporters to carry the struggle throughout Mexico and beyond its borders.

The Breakthrough: Politics and Race in the Age of Obama
The Breakthrough
Politics and Race in the Age of Obama
Paperback      ISBN: 0767928903

In The Breakthrough, veteran journalist Gwen Ifill surveys the American political landscape, shedding new light on the impact of Barack Obama's stunning presidential victory and introducing the emerging young African American politicians forging a bold new path to political power.

Ifill argues that the Black political structure formed during the Civil Rights movement is giving way to a generation of men and women who are the direct beneficiaries of the struggles of the 1960s. She offers incisive, detailed profiles of such prominent leaders as Newark Mayor Cory Booker, Massachusetts Governor Deval Patrick, and U.S. Congressman Artur Davis of Alabama (all interviewed for this book), and also covers numerous up-and-coming figures from across the nation. Drawing on exclusive interviews with power brokers such as President Obama, former Secretary of State Colin Powell, Vernon Jordan, the Reverend Jesse Jackson, his son Congressman Jesse Jackson Jr., and many others, as well as her own razor-sharp observations and analysis of such issues as generational conflict, the race/ gender clash, and the "black enough" conundrum, Ifill shows why this is a pivotal moment in American history.

The Breakthrough is a remarkable look at contemporary politics and an essential foundation for understanding the future of American democracy in the age of Obama.
Challenging Racism and Sexism: Alternatives to Genetic Explanations
Challenging Racism and Sexism
Alternatives to Genetic Explanations
Paperback      ISBN: 1558610901

In this highly volatile debate over the scientific treatment of race and gender, this is the first collection to examine race and gender together. In an effort to uncover the social underpinnings of hatred based on difference, this volume challenges arguments that such traits such as intelligence or aggression are genetically determined along racial or gender lines and provides alternative accounts of the origins of racism and sexism and-most importantly-the nature and consequences of intersection. Contriubutors include Beverly Greene, Gerald Horn, Ruth Hubbard, Gisela Kaplan, Lesley Rogers, and Choichiro Yatani. Simona Sharoni's Feminist Reflection on the Interplay of Racism and Sexism in Israel is representative of the level of analysis in this collection. A political scientist and an expert in conflcit analysis and resolution, Sharoni describes the intersection of racism and sexism as it effects Oriental jews, Palestinians, and Israelis, in the particular context of governmental military policies and social practices, and opens up new space for social and political change. Challenging racism and sexism is blobal in scope, and hosts perspectives from a wide range of disciplines, including biology, educational studies, history, philosophy, physiology, and psychology. Essay topics include the creation of race and sex as biological categories, derivatives of racism and sexism in psychotherapy, a study of the rape-lynch controversy, and myths and realities regarding school performance of Asian and Asian-American school children.

Orientalism
Orientalism
Paperback      ISBN: 039474067x

More than three decades after its first publication, Edward Said's groundbreaking critique of the West's historical, cultural, and political perceptions of the East has become a modern classic.

In this wide-ranging, intellectually vigorous study, Said traces the origins of "orientalism" to the centuries-long period during which Europe dominated the Middle and Near East and, from its position of power, defined "the orient" simply as "other than" the occident. This entrenched view continues to dominate western ideas and, because it does not allow the East to represent itself, prevents true understanding. Essential, and still eye-opening, Orientalism remains one of the most important books written about our divided world.
White Nation: Fantasies of White Supremacy in a Multicultural Society
White Nation
Fantasies of White Supremacy in a Multicultural Society
Paperback      ISBN: 0415929237

Using the experience of immigration policy and the rise of Pauline Hanson's neo-fascist One Nation party in Australia, Hage (anthropology, U. of Sydney) argues that white racists and tolerant multiculturists both see their nation structured around a white culture that they control, with aboriginal people and migrants as exotic objects. His study was first published in 1998 by Pluto Press in Australia and Comerford and Miller in Britain. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

The Dream Palace of the Arabs: A Generation's Odyssey
The Dream Palace of the Arabs
A Generation's Odyssey
Paperback      ISBN: 0375704744

From Fouad Ajami, an acclaimed author and chronicler of Arab politics, comes a compelling account of how a generation of Arab intellectuals tried to introduce cultural renewals in their homelands through the forces of modernity and secularism. Ultimately, they came to face disappointment, exile, and, on occasion, death. Brilliantly weaving together the strands of a tumultuous century in Arab political thought, history, and poetry, Ajami takes us from the ruins of Beirut's once glittering metropolis to the land of Egypt, where struggle rages between a modernist impulse and an Islamist insurgency, from Nasser's pan-Arab nationalist ambitions to the emergence of an uneasy Pax Americana in Arab lands, from the triumphalism of the Gulf War to the continuing anguished debate over the Israeli-Palestinian peace accords.

For anyone who seeks to understand the Middle East, here is an insider's unflinching analysis of the collision between intellectual life and political realities in the Arab world today.
Floodlines: Community and Resistance from Katrina to the Jena Six
Floodlines
Community and Resistance from Katrina to the Jena Six
Paperback      ISBN: 1608460657

"This is the most important book I've read about Katrina and what came after. In the tradition of Howard Zinn this could be called 'The People's History of the Storm.' Jordan Flaherty was there on the front lines."
--Eve Ensler, playwright of The Vagina Monologues and activist and founder of V-Day

"Jordan Flaherty brings the sharp analysis and dedication of a seasoned organizer to his writing, and insightful observation to his reporting. He unfailingly has his ear to the ground in a city that continues to reveal the floodlines of structural racism in America."--Tram Nguyen, author of We Are All Suspects Now: Untold Stories from Immigrant Communities after 9/11

Floodlines is a firsthand account of community, culture, and resistance in New Orleans. The book weaves the stories of gay rappers, Mardi Gras Indians, Arab and Latino immigrants, public housing residents, and grassroots activists in the years before and after Katrina. From post-Katrina evacuee camps to torture testimony at Angola Prison to organizing with the family members of the Jena Six, Floodlines tells the stories behind the headlines from an unforgettable time and place in history.

Jordan Flaherty is a writer and community organizer based in New Orleans. In addition to his award-winning post-Katrina journalism, he was the first journalist with a national audience to write about the Jena Six case and played an important role in bringing the story to theattention of the world. He has produced news segments for Al-Jazeera, TeleSur, and Democracy Now and appeared as a guest on a wide range of television and radio shows, including CNN's American Morning, Anderson Cooper 360, CNN Headline News, GRITtv, Keep Hope Alive with Reverend Jesse Jackson, and both local and nationally syndicated shows on National Public Radio.


Making Whiteness: The Culture of Segregation in the South, 1890-1940
Making Whiteness
The Culture of Segregation in the South, 1890-1940
Paperback      ISBN: 0679776206
Making Whiteness is a profoundly important work that explains how and why whiteness came to be such a crucial, embattled--and distorting--component of twentieth-century American identity. In intricately textured detail and with passionately mastered analysis, Grace Elizabeth Hale shows how, when faced with the active citizenship of their ex-slaves after the Civil War, white southerners re-established their dominance through a cultural system based on violence and physical separation. And in a bold and transformative analysis of the meaning of segregation for the nation as a whole, she explains how white southerners' creation of modern "whiteness" was, beginning in the 1920s, taken up by the rest of the nation as a way of enforcing a new social hierarchy while at the same time creating the illusion of a national, egalitarian, consumerist democracy.

By showing the very recent historical "making" of contemporary American whiteness and by examining how the culture of segregation, in all its murderous contradictions, was lived, Hale makes it possible to imagine a future outside it. Her vision holds out the difficult promise of a truly democratic American identity whose possibilities are no longer limited and disfigured by race.
Forced Passages: Imprisoned Radical Intellectuals And the U.S. Prison Regime
Forced Passages
Imprisoned Radical Intellectuals And the U.S. Prison Regime
Paperback      ISBN: 0816645612

More than two million people are currently imprisoned in the United States, and the nation's incarceration rate is now the highest in the world. The dramatic rise and consolidation of America's prison system has devastated lives and communities. But it has also transformed prisons into primary sites of radical political discourse and resistance as they have become home to a growing number of writers, activists, poets, educators, and other intellectuals who offer radical critiques of American society both within and beyond the prison walls.

In Forced Passages, Dylan Rodr guez argues that the cultural production of such imprisoned intellectuals as Mumia Abu-Jamal, Angela Davis, Leonard Peltier, George Jackson, Jos Solis Jordan, Ramsey Muniz, Viet Mike Ngo, and Marilyn Buck should be understood as a social and intellectual movement in and of itself, unique in context and substance. Rodr guez engages with a wide range of texts, including correspondence, memoirs, essays, poetry, communiqu s, visual art, and legal writing, drawing on published works by widely recognized figures and by individuals outside the public's field of political vision or concern. Throughout, Rodr guez focuses on the conditions under which imprisoned intellectuals live and work, and he explores how incarceration shapes the ways in which insurgent knowledge is created, disseminated, and received.

More than a series of close readings of prison literature, Forced Passages identifies and traces the discrete lineage of radical prison thought since the 1970s, one formed by the logic of state violence and by the endemic racism of the criminal justice system.

Dylan Rodr guez is assistant professor of ethnic studies at the University of California, Riverside.