Nature and Ecology
Featured Items
Year of the Fires: The Story of the Great Fires of 1910
Year of the Fires
The Story of the Great Fires of 1910
Paperback      ISBN: 0142001171

The wildfires of the summer of 1910 scorched millions of acres in the western states, depositing soot as far away as Greenland. Through the experiences and words of rangers, soldiers, politicians, scientists, and the volunteers who fought the fires and were forever scarred by them, acclaimed historian and former forest fire fighter Stephen Pyne tells the story of that catastrophic year and its indelible legacy on the firefighting policies of today. Not only does Pyne explain how wildfires happen and how they are fought, he also chronicles the ongoing debate on the relative merits of firefighting versus "light burning." More than a memorable adventure tale, "Year of the Fires" is the story of a profound event that continues to shape American life.
"Year of the Fires is a pleasure to read." ("The New York Review of Books")
"Powerful and absorbing." ("Austin American-Statesman")

The Solace of Open Spaces
The Solace of Open Spaces
Paperback      ISBN: 0140081135
A collection of transcendent, lyrical essays on life in the American West, the classic companion to Gretel Ehrlich's new book, Unsolaced

"Wyoming has found its Whitman." --Annie Dillard

Poet and filmmaker Gretel Ehrlich went to Wyoming in 1975 to make the first in a series of documentaries when her partner died. Ehrlich stayed on and found she couldn't leave. The Solace of Open Spaces is a chronicle of her first years on "the planet of Wyoming," a personal journey into a place, a feeling, and a way of life.

Ehrlich captures both the otherworldly beauty and cruelty of the natural forces--the harsh wind, bitter cold, and swiftly changing seasons--in the remote reaches of the American West. She brings depth, tenderness, and humor to her portraits of the peculiar souls who also call it home: hermits and ranchers, rodeo cowboys and schoolteachers, dreamers and realists. Together, these essays form an evocative and vibrant tribute to the life Ehrlich chose and the geography she loves.

Originally written as journal entries addressed to a friend, The Solace of Open Spaces is raw, meditative, electrifying, and uncommonly wise. In prose "as expansive as a Wyoming vista, as charged as a bolt of prairie lightning" (Newsday), Ehrlich explores the magical interplay between our interior lives and the world around us.
Wanderlust: A History of Walking
Wanderlust
A History of Walking
Paperback      ISBN: 0140286012
A passionate, thought provoking exploration of walking as a political and cultural activity, from the author of the memoir Recollections of My Nonexistence

Drawing together many histories--of anatomical evolution and city design, of treadmills and labyrinths, of walking clubs and sexual mores--Rebecca Solnit creates a fascinating portrait of the range of possibilities presented by walking. Arguing that the history of walking includes walking for pleasure as well as for political, aesthetic, and social meaning, Solnit focuses on the walkers whose everyday and extreme acts have shaped our culture, from philosophers to poets to mountaineers. She profiles some of the most significant walkers in history and fiction--from Wordsworth to Gary Snyder, from Jane Austen's Elizabeth Bennet to Andre Breton's Nadja--finding a profound relationship between walking and thinking and walking and culture. Solnit argues for the necessity of preserving the time and space in which to walk in our ever more car-dependent and accelerated world.
Refuge: An Unnatural History of Family and Place
Refuge
An Unnatural History of Family and Place
Paperback      ISBN: 0679740244

In the spring of 1983 Terry Tempest Williams learned that her mother was dying of cancer. That same season, The Great Salt Lake began to rise to record heights, threatening the Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge and the herons, owls, and snowy egrets that Williams, a poet and naturalist, had come to gauge her life by. One event was nature at its most random, the other a by-product of rogue technology: Terry's mother, and Terry herself, had been exposed to the fallout of atomic bomb tests in the 1950s. As it interweaves these narratives of dying and accommodation, Refuge transforms tragedy into a document of renewal and spiritual grace, resulting in a work that has become a classic.

Of Time and Place
Of Time and Place
Paperback      ISBN: 0816629951

Of Time and Place is a legacy from one of the best-loved nature writers of our time. In this, his last book, completed just before his death, Sigurd F. Olson guides readers through his wide-ranging memories of a lifetime dedicated to the preservation of the wilderness. Like his other best-selling books, Of Time and Place is filled with beauty, adventure, and wonder.

Olson recalls his many friendships of trail and woods and portage, his favorite campsites, the stories behind the artifacts and mementos hanging in his cabin at Listening Point. Whether he is remembering canoe trips with his friends, admiring the playful grace of the otter, or pondering the Earth's great cycles of climatic change, these moving and evocative essays reaffirm Olson's stature as one of the greatest nature writers of this century.

Economics of the Environment: Selected Readings
Economics of the Environment
Selected Readings
Paperback      ISBN: 0393975231

Two thirds of the essays in the new edition of this widely used collection of essays in environmental economics are new. They range from seminal articles on the cost and the benefits of environmental protection to the goals and the means of environmental policy. Topical pieces probe critical issues such as global climate change and ecological values. Environmental policy options are explored in depth and the fundamental principles for assessing their benefits and costs are developed and illustrated.

On the Banks of the Ganga: When Wastewater Meets a Sacred River
On the Banks of the Ganga
When Wastewater Meets a Sacred River
Paperback      ISBN: 0472068083

In this rich ethnographic study, Kelly D. Alley sheds light on debates about water uses, wastewater management, and the meanings of waste and sacred power. On the Banks of the Ganga analyzes the human predicaments that result from the accumulation and disposal of waste by tracing how citizens of India interpret the impact of wastewater flows on a sacred river and on their own cultural practices.
Alley investigates ethno-semantic, discursive, and institutional data to flesh out the interplay between religious, scientific, and official discourses about the river Ganga. Using a new outward layering methodology, she points out that anthropological analysis must separate the historical and discursive strands of the debates concerning waste and sacred purity in order to reveal the cultural complexities that surround the Ganga. Ultimately, she addresses a deeply rooted cultural paradox: if the Ganga river is considered sacred by Hindus across India, then why do the people allow it to become polluted?
Examining areas of contemporary concern such as water usage and urban waste management in the most populated river basin in the world, this book will appeal to anthropologists and readers in religious, environmental, and Asian studies, as well as geography and law.
Kelly D. Alley is Associate Professor and Director of Anthropology at Auburn University. In addition to being a prolific writer, she has conducted research on public culture and environmental issues in northern India for over a decade. Alley is currently overseeing a project to ameliorate river pollution problems in India.

A Sand County Almanac: With Essays on Conservation from Round River
A Sand County Almanac
With Essays on Conservation from Round River
Paperback      ISBN: 0345345053
The environmental classic that redefined the way we think about the natural world--an urgent call for preservation that's more timely than ever.

"We can place this book on the shelf that holds the writings of Thoreau and John Muir."--San Francisco Chronicle

These astonishing portraits of the natural world explore the breathtaking diversity of the unspoiled American landscape--the mountains and the prairies, the deserts and the coastlines. Conjuring up one extraordinary vision after another, Aldo Leopold takes readers with him on the road and through the seasons on a fantastic tour of our priceless natural resources, explaining the destructive effects humankind has had on the land and issuing a bold challenge to protect the world we love.
A Wild Neighborhood
A Wild Neighborhood
Paperback      ISBN: 0816630178

John Henricksson's neighbors stop by to chat or to have a bite to eat or just to sit and watch. But in his Wild Neighborhood the visitors are the black bear, gray jay, timber wolf, owl, white-tailed deer, raven, and the moose.

A Wild Neighborhood is a collection of elegantly written essays about these creatures. From kitchen-table gossip about the black bear's recent attempts to raid the bird feeder, to the retelling of Native American myths about the mischievous raven, Henricksson shows a love and understanding of the residents with whom he shares the narrow wedge of the Superior National Forest in northeastern Minnesota.

Henricksson writes of the personal relationships that develop while living in the woods. He tells of the joy of helping a deer survive a tough winter and the mystery of animals he calls "ghosts" -- species that are extinct or near extinct but still have a fleeting presence in the area.

This personal account of a vibrant community in the woods will appeal to readers of all ages and make a beautiful gift for everyone who has admired the creatures of his or her own wild neighborhood.

The World Is as You Dream It: Teachings from the Amazon and Andes
The World Is as You Dream It
Teachings from the Amazon and Andes
Paperback      ISBN: 0892814594
After 'Hit Man'

The New York Times bestseller Confessions of an Economic Hit Man documents John Perkins' extraordinary career as a globe-trotting economic hit man. Perkins' insider's view leads him to crisis of conscience--to the realization that he must devote himself to work which will foster a world-wide awareness of the sanctity of indigenous peoples, their cultures, and their environments. Perkins' books demonstrate how the age-old shamanic techniques of some of the world's most primitive peoples have sparked a revolution in modern concepts about healing, the subconscious, and the powers each of us has to alter individual and communal reality.

Deep in the rain forests and high in the Andes of Ecuador, native shamans teach the age-old technique of dream change, a tradition that has kept the cultures of the Otavalans, Salasacans, and Shuar alive despite centuries of conquest. Now these shamans are turning their wisdom and power to the problem of curing a new kind of illness--that created by the industrial world's dream of dominating and exploiting nature.

John Perkins tells the story of these remarkable shamans and of the U.S. medical doctors, psychologists, and scientists who have gone with him to learn the techniques of dream change. These shamanic teachings have sparked a revolution in modern concepts about healing, the subconscious, and the powers each of us has to alter individual and communal reality.