United States History 1900-1950
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The Letters of Sacco and Vanzetti
The Letters of Sacco and Vanzetti
Paperback      ISBN: 0806508949
The Long Gray Line
The Long Gray Line
Paperback      ISBN: 0805062912

The first trade paperback edition of the "New York Times" best-seller about West Point's Class of 1966, by Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Rick Atkinson.
This is the story of the twenty-five-year adventure of the generation of officers who fought in Vietnam. With novelistic detail, Atkinson tells the story of West Point's Class of 1966 primarily through the experiences of three classmates and the women they loved--from the boisterous cadet years and youthful romances to the fires of Vietnam, where dozens of their classmates died and hundreds more grew disillusioned, to the hard peace and family adjustments that followed. The rich cast of characters includes Douglas MacArthur, William Westmoreland, and a score of other memorable figures. The West Point Class of 1966 straddled a fault line in American history, and Rick Atkinson's masterly book speaks for a generation of American men and women about innocence, patriotism, and the price we pay for our dreams.

On Great White Wings: The Wright Brothers and the Race for Flight
On Great White Wings
The Wright Brothers and the Race for Flight
1st Edition    Hardcover      ISBN: 0786866861

On the eve of the hundredth anniversary of the historic events at Kitty Hawk comes a splendidly illustrated account of the legendary twelve-second flight that changed the world forever.
On December 17, 1903, Orville and Wilbur Wright took to the air for less than a minute, accomplishing what mankind had only dreamed of for centuries. Now, almost one hundred years later, this definitive account offers a unique look at the Wright Brothers' achievement, and at the many experiments that led up to their momentous ride.
Revealing the brothers' youthful interest in technology and flight, the authors recount the trials and errors of other would-be aviators, and explain how the race to be the first man aloft became an international obsession. Readers will learn how The Flyer--the Wright Brothers' original plane--was built, and how its indefatigable inventors solved the challenges that stumped their predecessors. And finally there is the historic flight itself--what went wrong and what, amazingly, went right--and the enormous impact the Wright Brothers had on their own and future generations. Written in engaging, accessible prose and, featuring more than 200 photographs and illustrations, On Great White Wings will delight anyone interested in the history of flight and in the fantastic story behind the twentieth century's most important achievement.

Intelligence Wars: American Secret History from Hitler to Al-Qaeda
Intelligence Wars
American Secret History from Hitler to Al-Qaeda
Paperback      ISBN: 1590170989
This updated edition contains new analysis on the situation in Iraq and the war against terrorism.

Sold over 10,000 copies in hardcover.

No one outside the intelligence services knows more about their culture than Thomas Powers. In this book he tells stories of shadowy successes, ghastly failures, and, more often, gripping uncertainties. They range from the CIA's long cold war struggle with its Russian adversary to debates about the use of secret intelligence in a democratic society, and urgent contemporary issues such as whether the CIA and the FBI can defend America against terrorism.
The Times Were a Changin': The Sixties Reader
The Times Were a Changin'
The Sixties Reader
1st Edition    Paperback      ISBN: 0609803379

This is a must-have anthology of the milestone speeches, manifestos, court decisions, and groundbreaking journalism of the Sixties. No other period in American history has been more liberating, more confusing, more unforgettable, and had a more direct impact on the way we navigated the profound changes that swept over the country in the following three decades.

From Betty Friedan to Barry Goldwater, from the formidable presence of the Kennedy brothers to the unimaginable influence of Woodstock, Pulitzer prize-winning author Irwin Unger and journalist Debi Unger present the complexities of a volatile and tumultuous decade, while explaining how and why each significant event took place and how it shifted the country's consciousness.

From the antiwar movement to the moon race, from the burgeoning counterculture to the Warren and Berger courts, and from the civil rights movement to the 1968 presidential campaign, The Times Were a Changin' will tantalize and confound readers, while inspiring and enraging them as well. The Ungers provide us with a better understanding of the strategy and maneuvering of the 1960s war games--from the Bay of Pigs to the Tet Offensive. And the pieces they have chosen help us define the current of social intolerance that plagues our country to this day.

Balancing the controversial issues of the times with an even hand, the Ungers give equal time to William F. Buckley and Abbie Hoffman, Barry Goldwater and Hubert Humphrey, the Black Panthers and Martin Luther King, Jr., compiling an anthology that supplies rhyme and reason to a decade that never ceases to amaze us, endless in its capacity to be explored and understood.
Part of Our Time: Some Ruins and Monuments of the Thirties
Part of Our Time
Some Ruins and Monuments of the Thirties
Paperback      ISBN: 1590170873

Through brilliant portraits of real persons who created the myths and realities of the 1930s, the Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Murray Kempton brings that turbulent decade to life. Himself a child of the time, Kempton examines with the insight and imagination of a novelist the men and women who embraced, grappled with, and in many cases were destroyed by the myth of revolution. What he calls the "ruins and monuments of the Thirties" include Paul Robeson, Alger Hiss, and Whittaker Chambers, the Hollywood Ten, the rebel women Elizabeth Bentley and Mary Heaton Vorse, and the labor leaders Walter Reuther and Joe Curran.

The Dark Side of Camelot
The Dark Side of Camelot
Paperback      ISBN: 0316360678
A monumental work of investigative journalism from one of the greatest reporters in American history, revealing the Kennedy White House as never before.
In this widely acclaimed and bestselling book, the award-winning investigative reporter Seymour M. Hersh reveals a John F. Kennedy we have never seen before, a man insulated from the normal consequences of behavior long before he entered the White House. His father, Joe, set the pattern: Kennedys could do exactly what they wanted. There was no secret that money and charm could not hide. Kennedys wrote their own moral code.
By the end of Jack Kennedy's life, his private recklessness had begun to edge into his public life, putting him -- and his nation -- at risk. Now, for the first time, Seymour Hersh tells the real story of those risks, as he brilliantly re-creates the life and world of a crisis-driven president who maintained a facade of cool toughness while negotiating private compromises unknown to even his closest advisers.
"Not merely a great read, Much of what's in The Dark Side of Camelot is also 1) new; 2) shocking; 3) well supported; and 4) worth knowing." --Jacob Weisberg, Slate
Triangle: The Fire That Changed America
Triangle
The Fire That Changed America
Paperback      ISBN: 080214151x

"Sure to become the definitive account of the fire. . . . Triangle is social history at its best, a magnificent portrayal not only of the catastrophe but also of the time and the turbulent city in which it took place." --The New York Times Book Review

Triangle is a poignantly detailed account of the 1911 disaster that horrified the country and changed the course of twentieth-century politics and labor relations. On March 25, 1911, as workers were getting ready to leave for the day, a fire broke out in the Triangle Shirtwaist factory in New York's Greenwich Village. Within minutes it spread to consume the building's upper three stories. Firemen who arrived at the scene were unable to rescue those trapped inside: their ladders simply weren't tall enough. People on the street watched in horror as desperate workers jumped to their deaths. The final toll was 146 people--123 of them women. It was the worst disaster in New York City history. Triangle is a vibrant and immensely moving account that Bob Woodward calls, "A riveting history written with flare and precision."
Looking Back
Looking Back
Paperback      ISBN: 1590170881

From his youthful days as a delivery boy for William Randolph Hearst's Baltimore newspapers through his many years as a journalist and commentator, Russell Baker has been a keen observer of American politics and culture. Now, in these eleven essays, all originally published in The New York Review of Books, he looks back on a group of iconic public figures from his own past.

Profiled here are presidents (Lyndon Johnson feuding with Robert F. Kennedy, and Richard Nixon in his grasping, spectral exile), would-be presidents (Eugene V. Debs and Barry Goldwater, "gentlemen fallen among brutes"), and those who set their sights on something besides the presidency (Joe DiMaggio, and Martin Luther King, "the one indisputably great American of the century's second half").

Undeluded by the roar of what he calls "our national engines of ballyhoo, bushwah, and baloney," Russell Baker reflects on the strange fascination that these larger-than-life characters have held for the American imagination. With an elegiac yet shrewd sense of their accomplishments both enduring and ephemeral, he traces the impressions they left on twentieth-century America--and on him.
The Boy Genius and the Mogul: The Untold Story of Television
The Boy Genius and the Mogul
The Untold Story of Television
Hardcover      ISBN: 0767907590

The world remembers Edison, Ford, and the Wright Brothers. But what about Philo T. Farnsworth, the inventor of television, an innovation that did as much as any other to shape the twentieth century? That question lies at the heart of "The Boy Genius and the Mogul," Daniel Stashower's captivating chronicle of television's true inventor, the battle he faced to capitalize on his breakthrough, and the powerful forces that resulted in the collapse of his dreams.
The son of a Mormon farmer, Farnsworth was born in 1906 in a single-room log cabin on an isolated homestead in Utah. The Farnsworth family farm had no radio, no telephone, and no electricity. Yet, motivated by the stories of scientists and inventors he read about in the science magazines of the day, young Philo set his sights on becoming an inventor. By his early teens, Farnsworth had become an inveterate tinkerer, able to repair broken farm equipment when no one else could. It was inevitable that when he read an article about a new idea -- for the transmission of pictures by radio waves--that he would want to attempt it himself. One day while he was walking through a hay field, Farnsworth took note of the straight, parallel lines of the furrows and envisioned a system of scanning a visual image line by line and transmitting it to a remote screen. He soon sketched a diagram for an early television camera tube. It was 1921 and Farnsworth was only fourteen years old.
Farnsworth went on to college to pursue his studies of electrical engineering but was forced to quit after two years due to the death of his father. Even so, he soon managed to persuade a group of California investors to set him up in his own research lab where, in 1927, he produced the first all-electronic television image and later patented his invention. While Farnsworth's invention was a landmark, it was also the beginning of a struggle against an immense corporate power that would consume much of his life. That corporate power was embodied by a legendary media mogul, RCA President and NBC founder David Sarnoff, who claimed that his chief scientist had invented a mechanism for television prior to Farnsworth's. Thus the boy genius and the mogul were locked in a confrontation over who would control the future of television technology and the vast fortune it represented. Farnsworth was enormously outmatched by the media baron and his army of lawyers and public relations people, and, by the 1940s, Farnsworth would be virtually forgotten as television's actual inventor, while Sarnoff and his chief scientist would receive the credit.
Restoring Farnsworth to his rightful place in history, "The Boy Genius and the Mogul" presents a vivid portrait of a self-taught scientist whose brilliance allowed him to "capture light in a bottle." A rich and dramatic story of one man's perseverance and the remarkable events leading up to the launch of television as we know it, "The Boy Genius and the Mogul "shines new light on a major turning point in American history.