Urban Studies
Featured Items
A Field Guide to Sprawl
A Field Guide to Sprawl
Hardcover      ISBN: 0393731251
A visual lexicon of colorful slang terms coined by real estate developers and designers offers insight into land-use practices and the physical elements of American sprawl, in a volume that features color aerial photographs and an analysis of the impact of excessive development.
Biopolis: Patrick Geddes and the City of Life
Biopolis
Patrick Geddes and the City of Life
Hardcover      ISBN: 0262232111
Winner in the 2003 AAUP Book, Jacket, and Journal Competition in the Scholarly Illustrated category. The Scottish urbanist and biologist Patrick Geddes (1854-1932) is perhaps best known for introducing the concept of "region" to architecture and planning. At the turn of the twentieth century, he was one of the strongest advocates of town planning and an active participant in debates about the future of the city. He was arguably the first planner to recognize the importance of historic city centers, and his renewal work in Edinburgh's Old Town is visible and impressive to this day. Geddes's famous analytical triad
Sugar's Life in the Hood: The Story of a Former Welfare Mother
Sugar's Life in the Hood
The Story of a Former Welfare Mother
1st Edition    Hardcover      ISBN: 0292721021
A former welfare mother chronicles her experiences living in the inner city, juggling welfare, sketchy jobs, tumultuous relationships, and motherhood, while trying to steer clear of the ravages of drug addiction and prostitution.
New Urbanism and Beyond: Designing Cities for the Future
New Urbanism and Beyond
Designing Cities for the Future
Hardcover      ISBN: 0847831116
A detailed primer on urban design offers insight into how the form reflects an intersection of myriad forces from social and economic to cultural and aesthetic, in a lavishly illustrated account that discusses such topics as the challenge of limited resources and the issue of urban sprawl.
Sidewalk
Sidewalk
Paperback      ISBN: 0374527253
An exceptional ethnography marked by clarity and candor, Sidewalk takes us into the socio-cultural environment of those who, though often seen as threatening or unseemly, work day after day on “the blocks” of one of New York’s most diverse neighborhoods. Sociologist Duneier, author of Slim’s Table, offers an accessible and compelling group portrait of several poor black men who make their livelihoods on the sidewalks of Greenwich Village selling secondhand goods, panhandling, and scavenging books and magazines. Duneier spent five years with these individuals, and in Sidewalk he argues that, contrary to the opinion of various city officials, they actually contribute significantly to the order and well-being of the Village. An important study of the heart and mind of the street, Sidewalk also features an insightful afterword by longtime book vendor Hakim Hasan. This fascinating study reveals today’s urban life in all its complexity: its vitality, its conflicts about class and race, and its surprising opportunities for empathy among strangers. Sidewalk is an excellent supplementary text for a range of courses: INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY: Shows how to make important links between micro and macro; how a research project works; how sociology can transform common sense. RACE AND ETHNIC RELATIONS: Untangles race, class, and gender as they work together on the street. URBAN STUDIES: Asks how public space is used and contested by men and women, blacks and whites, rich and poor, and how street life and political economy interact. DEVIANCE: Looks at labeling processes in treatment of the homeless; interrogates the “broken windows” theory of policing. LAW AND SOCIETY: Closely examines the connections between formal and informal systems of social control. METHODS: Shows how ethnography works; includes a detailed methodological appendix and an afterword by research subject Hakim Hasan. CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY: Sidewalk engages the rich terrain of recent developments regarding representation, writing, and authority; in the tradition of Elliot Liebow and Ulf Hannerz, it deals with age old problems of the social and cultural experience of inequality; this is a telling study of culture on the margins of American society. CULTURAL STUDIES: Breaking down disciplinary boundaries, Sidewalk shows how books and magazines are received and interpreted in discussions among working-class people on the sidewalk; it shows how cultural knowledge is deployed by vendors and scavengers to generate subsistence in public space. SOCIOLOGY OF CULTURE: Sidewalk demonstrates the connections between culture and human agency and innovation; it interrogates distinctions between legitimate subcultures and deviant collectivities; it illustrates conflicts over cultural diversity in public space; and, ultimately, it shows how conflicts over meaning are central to social life.
Sleepers
Sleepers
Paperback      ISBN: 0345404114
A true story of friendship, revenge, and ambiguous justice centers on four men who, as teenagers in an upstate New York reform school, were brutalized by guards, one of whom crosses their path years later
Home from Nowhere: Remaking Our Everyday World for the Twenty-First Century
Home from Nowhere
Remaking Our Everyday World for the Twenty-First Century
Paperback      ISBN: 0684837374
Describes the landscape debates and movements in America that attempt to restore the beauty of its dwelling places
The Corner: A Year in the Life of an Inner-City Neighborhood
The Corner
A Year in the Life of an Inner-City Neighborhood
Paperback      ISBN: 0767900316
Chronicles the experiences of a broken family over the course of a year to illustrate life in Baltimore's drug-racked inner-city
Savage Inequalities: Children in America's Schools
Savage Inequalities
Children in America's Schools
Paperback      ISBN: 0060974990
An account of the inequity in the American educational system examines the deplorable conditions in which inner-city children are educated
Low Life: Lures and Snares of Old New York
Low Life
Lures and Snares of Old New York
Paperback      ISBN: 0374528993
Luc Sante's Low Life is a portrait of America's greatest city, the riotous and anarchic breeding ground of modernity. This is not the familiar saga of mansions, avenues, and robber barons, but the messy, turbulent, often murderous story of the city's slums; the teeming streets--scene of innumerable cons and crimes whose cramped and overcrowded housing is still a prominent feature of the cityscape. Low Life voyages through Manhattan from four different directions. Part One examines the actual topography of Manhattan from 1840 to 1919; Part Two, the era's opportunities for vice and entertainment--theaters and saloons, opium and cocaine dens, gambling and prostitution; Part Three investigates the forces of law and order which did and didn't work to contain the illegalities; Part Four counterposes the city's tides of revolt and idealism against the city as it actually was. Low Life provides an arresting and entertaining view of what New York was actually like in its salad days. But it's more than simpy a book about New York. It's one of the most provocative books about urban life ever written--an evocation of the mythology of the quintessential modern metropplois, which has much to say not only about New York's past but about the present and future of all cities. Luc Sante's Low Life is a portrait of America's greatest city, the riotous and anarchic breeding ground of modernity. This is not the familiar saga of mansions, avenues, and robber barons, but the messy, turbulent, often murderous story of the city's slums; the teeming streets--scene of innumerable cons and crimes whose cramped and overcrowded housing is still a prominent feature of the cityscape. Low Life voyages through Manhattan from four different directions. Part One examines the actual topography of Manhattan from 1840 to 1919; Part Two, the era's opportunities for vice and entertainment--theaters and saloons, opium and cocaine dens, gambling and prostitution; Part Three investigates the forces of law and order which did and didn't work to contain the illegalities; Part Four counterposes the city's tides of revolt and idealism against the city as it actually was. Low Life provides an arresting and entertaining view of what New York was actually like in its salad days. But it's more than simpy a book about New York. It's one of the most provocative books about urban life ever written--an evocation of the mythology of the quintessential modern metropplois, which has much to say not only about New York's past but about the present and future of all cities.