Non-Alcoholic Beverages
Brodo: A Bone Broth Cookbook
Brodo
A Bone Broth Cookbook
Hardcover      ISBN: 0553459503

No one has been more responsible for the recent explosion of interest in bone than New York City chef Marco Canora. After completely revitalizing his health by integrating bone broth into his diet, Marco began to make his nourishing broths available by the cupful to New Yorkers from a small window in his East Village restaurant, drawing sell-out crowds virtually from the beginning. No longer just a building block for soups and sauces, bone broths are now being embraced for their innumerable health benefits, from cultivating a healthier gut to greater resistance to colds and other illnesses. In Brodo, Marco shares the recipes for his flavorful, nutritious broths and shows how to serve them year round as well as incorporate them into recipes and as a daily health practice. Perfect for stirring into a broth bowl or a pot of risotto, as a more gentle, supportive alternative to the afternoon caffeine fix, and an immunity and health booster any time, the homey bone broths in Brodo should be a part of every well-stocked pantry.

Buzz: The Science and Lore of Alcohol and Caffeine
Buzz
The Science and Lore of Alcohol and Caffeine
Hardcover      ISBN: 0195092899

Alcohol and caffeine are deeply woven into the fabric of life for most of the world's population, as close and as comfortable as a cup of coffee or a can of beer. Yet for most people they remain as mysterious and unpredictable as the spirits they were once thought to be. Now, in Buzz, Stephen Braun takes us on a myth-shattering tour of these two popular substances, one that blends fascinating science with colorful lore, and that includes cameo appearances by Shakespeare and Balzac, Buddhist monks and Arabian goat herders, even Mikhail Gorbachev and David Letterman (who once quipped, "If it weren't for the coffee, I'd have no identifiable personality whatsoever").
Much of what Braun reveals directly contradicts conventional wisdom about alcohol and caffeine. Braun shows, for instance, that alcohol is not simply a depressant as popularly believed, but is instead "a pharmacy in a bottle"--mimicking the action of drugs such as cocaine, amphetamine, valium, and opium. At low doses, it increases electrical activity in the same brain systems affected by stimulants, influences the same circuits targeted by valium, and causes the release of morphine-like compounds known as endorphins--all at the same time. This explains why alcohol can produce a range of reactions, from boisterous euphoria to dark, brooding hopelessness. Braun also shatters the myth that alcohol kills brain cells, reveals why wood alcohol or methanol causes blindness, and explains the biological reason behind the one-drink-per-hour sobriety rule (that's how long it takes the liver, working full tilt, to disable the 200 quintillion ethanol molecules found in a typical drink). The author then turns to caffeine and shows it to be no less remarkable. We discover that more than 100 plant species produce caffeine molecules in their seeds, leaves, or bark, a truly amazing distribution throughout nature (nicotine, in comparison, is found only in tobacco; opium only in the poppy). It's not surprising then that caffeine is far and away the most widely used mind altering substance on the planet, found in tea, coffee, cocoa, chocolate, soft drinks, and more than 2,000 non-prescription drugs. (Tea is the most popular drink on earth, with coffee a close second.) Braun also explores the role of caffeine in creativity: Johann Sebastian Bach, for one, loved coffee so much he wrote a Coffee Cantata (as Braun notes, no music captures the caffeinated experience better than one of Bachs frenetic fugues), Balzac would work for 12 hours non-stop, drinking coffee all the while, and Kant, Rousseau, and Voltaire all loved coffee. And throughout the book, Braun takes us on many engaging factual sidetrips--we learn, for instance, that Theodore Roosevelt coined the phrase "Good to the last drop" used by Maxwell House ever since; that distances between Tibetan villages are sometimes reckoned by the number of cups of tea needed to sustain a person (three cups being roughly 8 kilometers); and that John Pemberton's original recipe for Coca-Cola included not only kola extract, but also cocaine.
Whether you are a sophisticated consumer of cabernet sauvignon and Kenya AA or just someone who needs a cup of joe in the morning and a cold one after work, you will find Buzz to be an eye-opening, informative, and often amusing look at two substances at once utterly familiar and deeply mysterious.

Café, Una Historia de Sabor Y Aromas
Café, Una Historia de Sabor Y Aromas
Spanish    Paperback      ISBN: 9877184796

Take a journey through the history of the beverage that's captivated the entire world. Learn the secrets that have made coffee a universal passion, plus the best recipes, preparations, and ways to drink it.

Un recorrido a lo largo de la historia de esta bebida que cautiv al mundo. Sus mejores recetas, preparaciones y formas de consumo. Los secretos que convirtieron al caf en una pasi n universal.

Cider: Making, Using, & Enjoying Sweet & Hard Cider
Cider
Making, Using, & Enjoying Sweet & Hard Cider
3rd Edition    Paperback      ISBN: 1580175201

Discover the pleasures of making and drinking cider. From choosing the right apples through reaping the liquid rewards of a successful pressing, this classic guide has you covered. With detailed drawings of cider-making equipment, methods, and set-up, even a novice juicer will enjoy sweet and spicy gallons in no time. Annie Proulx and Lew Nichols provide insightful, time-tested advice enlivened by a smattering of historical anecdotes. Whether you like your cider sweet or hard, you're sure to find a recipe that satisfies.

Clean Green Drinks: 100+ Cleansing Recipes to Renew & Restore Your Body and Mind
Clean Green Drinks
100+ Cleansing Recipes to Renew & Restore Your Body and Mind
Hardcover      ISBN: 055339083x

Cleanse. Sculpt your body, boost your health, renew your mind, and improve your whole outlook on life.

More than a collection of delicious recipes, Clean Green Drinks is a guide to a leaner, happier, and more fulfilled life. With more than 100 perfectly balanced, delicious drink recipes that can be made in a minute, the book will help anyone sip away extra pounds as they sip away stress. Health journalist and chef Candice Kumai reveals the new science behind her enticing, refreshing flavors; and she shows how easy it is to get fit, healthy, happy, and glowing

Coca: Divine Plant of the Incas
Coca
Divine Plant of the Incas
Paperback      ISBN: 1579512461

Coca is a plant with a complex array of mineral nutrients, essential oils, and varied compounds with greater or lesser pharmacological effects - one of which happens to be the alkaloid cocaine, which in its concentrated, synthesized form is a stimulant drug with possible addictive properties. Of all the plants introduced to the world by American Indian societies, few have been as controversial as the coca bush. Part of the Erythroxylum genus, the coca plant, whose leaves were first consumed by Andean Indians, is the source of the raw alkaloids that are refined to make cocaine. In Coca: The Divine Plant of the Incas, W. Golden Mortimer, M.D. presents an exhaustive, encyclopedic look at the plant's history and pharmacology. He traces its origins among the Native American peoples, who chewed the plant leaves for their stimulating and analgesic properties. From there, he examines the early European colonists' first encounters with the plant, how it became an object of intense study among naturalists and scientists, and how chemists first used it to create cocaine extract. Coca: The Divine Plant of the Incas includes: -Traditional Indian uses for coca -Early European explorers' impressions of the plant, first damned as an immoral intoxicant, and then praised as a stimulant for work and travel -The story of Angelo Mariani's coca-leaf wine, which won accolades from European royalty and the Pope -Botanical aspects of the coca plant varietals -Soil, humidity, elevation, latitude, and other factors necessary for the plant's growth -How to grow and harvest the plant, and cure and store coca leaf -Chemistry of the leaf, its alkaloids, and its extracts -How to extract cocaine from coca leaf -How to determine the purity and strength of coca extract -Coca and muscular energy, exercise, diet, and fatigue -Coca's effects on the body, the brain, and the nervous system -The pathology of cocaine use and addiction Filled with rare illustrations and diagrams, Coca: The Divine Plant of the Incas is a thorough historical and scientific examination of this little-understood plant and its products. It belongs in the library of anyone interested in pharmacology, botany, natural studies, or the history and culture of indigenous Americans. Coca explores the fascinating history of Coca, know as the Divine Plant of the Incas. The coca leaf has been chewed and brewed for tea traditionally for centuries among its indigenous peoples in the Andean region - and does not cause any harm and is beneficial to human health when the leaf is chewed. When chewed, coca is a mild stimulant and suppresses hunger, thirst, pain, and fatigue. It helps overcome altitude sickness, which is helpful in the Andes Mountains. It covers the Incan empire, its conquest by the Spaniards, the existence of coca within Incan society, early use of the drug, and the "present day" Indians of Peru. Coca chewing and drinking of coca tea is carried out daily by millions of people in the Andes without problems, and is considered sacred by indigenous cultures. Coca tea is widely used, even outside the Andean Amazon region. Coca leaf was originally used in the soft drink Coca Cola for its stimulant effect, but was removed in 1903 it was removed and replaced by a decocainized coca extract. Traditional medical uses of coca are foremost as a stimulant to overcome fatigue, hunger, and thirst. It also is used as an anesthetic to alleviate the pain of headache and sores. Before stronger anesthetics were available, coca leaves were used for broken bones, childbirth, and during operations on the skull. Coca leaves have been used for centuries as a stimulant. Coca is traditionally cultivated in the lower altitudes of the eastern slopes of the Andes, or the highlands depending on the species grown. Since ancient times, its leaves have been an important trade commodity between the lowlands where it is grown and the higher altitudes where it is widely consumed by the Andean peoples of Peru, Colombia, Ecuador, Venezuela, and Bolivia.

Coffee
Coffee
Hardcover      ISBN: 0745670768

In a world of high finance, unprecedented technological change, and cyber billionaires, it is easy to forget that a major source of global wealth is, literally, right under our noses. Coffee is one of the most valuable Southern exports, generating billions of dollars in corporate profits each year, even while the majority of the world's 25 million coffee families live in relative poverty.

But who is responsible for such vast inequality? Many analysts point to the coffee market itself, its price volatility and corporate oligarchy, and seek to "correct" it through fair trade, organic and sustainable coffee, corporate social responsibility, and a number of market-driven projects. The result has been widespread acceptance that the "market" is both the cause of underdevelopment and its potential solution.

Against this consensus, Gavin Fridell provocatively argues that state action, both good and bad, has been and continues to be central to the everyday operations of the coffee industry, even in today's world of "free trade". Combining rich history with an incisive analysis of key factors shaping the coffee business, Fridell challenges the notion that injustice in the industry can be solved "one sip at a time" - as ethical trade promoters put it. Instead, he points to the centrality of coffee statecraft both for preserving the status quo and for initiating meaningful changes to the coffee industry in the future.

Coffee: Philosophy for Everyon
Coffee
Philosophy for Everyon
Paperback      ISBN: 1444337122

Offering philosophical insights into the popular morning brew, Coffee -- Philosophy for Everyone kick starts the day with an entertaining but critical discussion of the ethics, aesthetics, metaphysics, and culture of coffee.

  • Matt Lounsbury of pioneering business Stumptown Coffee discusses just how good coffee can be
  • Caffeine-related chapters cover the ethics of the coffee trade, the metaphysics of coffee and the centrality of the coffee house to the public sphere
  • Includes a foreword by Donald Schoenholt, President at Gillies Coffee Company
Coffee: The World's Great Recipes, Stories and Histories
Coffee
The World's Great Recipes, Stories and Histories
Paperback      ISBN: 0979926033

Boxed set of 40 reference cards, offering color photographs, descriptions, histories and lore about the world's most popular and interesting coffee drinks. Accompanying recipes are also included.

Coffee and Coffeehouses: The Origins of a Social Beverage in the Medieval Near East
Coffee and Coffeehouses
The Origins of a Social Beverage in the Medieval Near East
Paperback      ISBN: 0295962313

Drawing on the accounts of early European travelers, original Arabic sources on jurisprudence and etiquette, and treatises on coffee from the period, the author recounts the colorful early history of the spread of coffee and the influence of coffeehouses in the medieval Near East. Detailed descriptions of the design, atmosphere, management, and patrons of early coffeehouses make fascinating reading for anyone interested in the history of coffee and the unique institution of the coffeehouse in urban Muslim society