Family and Reproductive Issues
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For Seven Lifetimes: An East-West Journey to a Spiritually Fulfilling and Sustainable Marriage
For Seven Lifetimes
An East-West Journey to a Spiritually Fulfilling and Sustainable Marriage
Paperback      ISBN: 1594773734

How to cultivate a successful marriage based on shared values and spiritual growth

- With new chapters on their past 15 years together, stories of happy marriages modeled on the book, marital "obedience," and the family way to world peace

- Reveals how a couple can become an engine for higher spiritual experiences

- Includes more than 60 letters written between the authors during their courtship and over 100 full-color photographs, including their traditional wedding in India

Defying the norms of her culture and tradition, a highly educated Tamil Brahmin woman decides to arrange her own marriage. Simultaneously, an American book publisher--disillusioned with love in the Western world--looks to India to find a wife by placing an ad in an Indian newspaper. A dialogue between two souls, two families, and two cultures, For Seven Lifetimes chronicles the year-long written courtship of this pair as they share their beliefs on sexuality, desire, gender roles, careers, parenthood, spirituality, and religion. By appreciating the similarities and differences in their worldviews, they initiate a union that reflects their ideals as a couple and the life they will create together.

Revealing the secrets to a fulfilling relationship based on shared values and spiritual growth, Vatsala and Ehud outline the principles needed to truly understand the roles of husband and wife and the questions to ask to recognize true spiritual compatibility. With new chapters on the 15 years since their wedding day, stories of happy marriages inspired by and modeled on the book, marital "obedience," and how a couple can become an engine for higher spiritual experiences, this new edition shows how the successful marriage reflects the greater union between the masculine and the feminine.
Riding Shotgun: Women Write about Their Mothers
Riding Shotgun
Women Write about Their Mothers
1st Edition    Hardcover      ISBN: 0873516141

Just in time for Mother's Day, a group of America's celebrated literary women have come together to tackle a topic close to their hearts: Mom. These highly personal yet often universal stories offer windows into those influential mother-daughter moments that have forever shaped the lives And perspectives of the writers, powerful women-authors, spokespeople, scholars, teachers, and some mothers themselves.

Jonis Agee's mother haunts her daughter's plumbing. Tai Coleman's mother struggled to raise five children on her own wits and a single paycheck. Heid Erdrich's mother showed her daughter both the falsity and the truth in the cliche of the "Indian Princess." Sheila O'Connor's mother, who ran a road construction company, was not like other mothers. Ka Vang's mother dodged the hand grenades that her husband's first wife threw on her wedding day. Morgan Grayce Willow's mother drove home late at night after selling cosmetics to farm wives as her daughter rode shotgun.

In true tales of startling candor and rich insight, these and many other talented writers reflect on the women who raised them, revealing hard work and hardship, successes and failures, love and anger-mothers and daughters.

Kathryn Kysar, the author of Dark Lake, teaches writing in Minneapolis. She has received fellowships from the National Endowment for the Humanities, Norcroft, the Anderson Center for Interdisciplinary Studies, and the Banfill-Locke Center for the Arts.

Reign of Error: The Hoax of the Privatization Movement and the Danger to America's Public Schools
Reign of Error
The Hoax of the Privatization Movement and the Danger to America's Public Schools
Hardcover      ISBN: 0385350880

From one of the foremost authorities on education in the United States, former U.S. assistant secretary of education, "whistle-blower extraordinaire" (The Wall Street Journal), author of the best-selling The Death and Life of the Great American School System ("Important and riveting"--Library Journal), The Language Police ("Impassioned . . . Fiercely argued . . . Every bit as alarming as it is illuminating"--The New York Times), and other notable books on education history and policy--an incisive, comprehensive look at today's American school system that argues against those who claim it is broken and beyond repair; an impassioned but reasoned call to stop the privatization movement that is draining students and funding from our public schools.
​In Reign of Error, Diane Ravitch argues that the crisis in American education is not a crisis of academic achievement but a concerted effort to destroy public schools in this country. She makes clear that, contrary to the claims being made, public school test scores and graduation rates are the highest they've ever been, and dropout rates are at their lowest point.

​She argues that federal programs such as George W. Bush's No Child Left Behind and Barack Obama's Race to the Top set unreasonable targets for American students, punish schools, and result in teachers being fired if their students underperform, unfairly branding those educators as failures. She warns that major foundations, individual billionaires, and Wall Street hedge fund managers are encouraging the privatization of public education, some for idealistic reasons, others for profit. Many who work with equity funds are eyeing public education as an emerging market for investors.
Reign of Error begins where The Death and Life of the Great American School System left off, providing a deeper argument against privatization and for public education, and in a chapter-by-chapter breakdown, putting forth a plan for what can be done to preserve and improve it. She makes clear what is right about U.S. education, how policy makers are failing to address the root causes of educational failure, and how we can fix it.

​For Ravitch, public school education is about knowledge, about learning, about developing character, and about creating citizens for our society. It's about helping to inspire independent thinkers, not just honing job skills or preparing people for college. Public school education is essential to our democracy, and its aim, since the founding of this country, has been to educate citizens who will help carry democracy into the future.
When Parents Part: How Mothers and Fathers Can Help Their Children Deal with Separation and Divorce
When Parents Part
How Mothers and Fathers Can Help Their Children Deal with Separation and Divorce
Paperback      ISBN: 1101872195

Using the latest scientific research in child development, Penelope Leach, author of the best-selling Your Baby & Child, details the effects of divorce on children in five stages of life--infants, toddlers, primary-school children, teenagers, and young adults--some of whom are far more deeply affected than previously thought. She explains recent studies that overturn common assumptions, showing, for example, that many standard custody arrangements for young children can be harmful. Leach's advice is meticulously considered and exhaustive, covering everything from access, custody, and financial and legal considerations to managing separate sets of technology in two households, and she includes the voices of parents and children to illustrate her points. Above all, she holds up "mutual parenting" as the ideal way to co-parent after a divorce, offering concrete ways for parents to put responsiveness to their children's needs ahead of their feelings about each other.

Reproductive Rights and Wrongs: The Global Politics of Population Control
Reproductive Rights and Wrongs
The Global Politics of Population Control
3rd Edition    Paperback      ISBN: 1608467333

With a new prologue by the author, this feminist classic is an important gateway into the controversial topic of population for students, activists, researchers and policymakers. It challenges the myth of overpopulation, uncovering the deeper roots of poverty, environmental degradation and gender inequalities. With vivid case studies, it explores how population control programs came to be promoted by powerful governments, foundations and international agencies as an instrument of Cold War development and security policy. Mainly targeting poor women, these programs were designed to drive down birth rates as rapidly and cheaply as possible, with coercion often a matter of course. In the war on population growth, birth control was deployed as a weapon, rather than as a tool of reproductive choice.

Threaded throughout Reproductive Rights and Wrongs is the story of how international women's health activists fought to reform population control and promote a new agenda of sexual and reproductive health and rights for all people. While their efforts bore fruit, many obstacles remain. On one side is the anti-choice movement that wants to deny women access not only to abortion, but to most methods of contraception. On the other is a resurgent, well-funded population control lobby that often obscures its motives with the language of women's empowerment. Despite declining birth rates worldwide - average global family size is now 2.5 children - overpopulation alarm is on the rise, tied now to the threats of climate change and terrorism. Reproductive Rights and Wrongs helps readers understand how these contemporary developments are rooted in the longer history and politics of population control. In the pages of this book a new generation of readers will find knowledge, argumentation and inspiration that will help in ongoing struggles to achieve reproductive rights and social, environmental and gender justice.
Broken Cord
Broken Cord
Paperback      ISBN: 0060916826

The controversial national bestseller that received unprecedented media attention, sparked the nation's interest in the plight of children with Fetal Alcohol Syndrome, and touched a nerve in all of us. Winner of the 1989 National Book Critics Circle Award.

Children of the City: At Work and at Play
Children of the City
At Work and at Play
Paperback      ISBN: 0345802977

The turn of the twentieth century was a time of explosive growth for American cities, a time of nascent hopes and apparently limitless possibilities. In Children of the City, David Nasaw re-creates this period in our social history from the vantage point of the children who grew up then. Drawing on hundreds of memoirs, autobiographies, oral histories and unpublished--and until now unexamined--primary source materials from cities across the country, he provides us with a warm and eloquent portrait of these children, their families, their daily lives, their fears, and their dreams.

Illustrated with 68 photographs from the period, many never before published, Children of the City offers a vibrant portrait of a time when our cities and our grandparents were young.
Wishing for a Snow Day: Growing Up in Minnesota
Wishing for a Snow Day
Growing Up in Minnesota
Paperback      ISBN: 0873516400

Beloved pets. Holiday rituals. Schoolyard antics. Teenage perspectives on a world at war. Childhood is a mixed bag of challenges and joys wherever one grows up. In Minnesota, youthful memories may be arranged seasonally: making snow angels in January, swatting mosquitoes in July. They may be tinged with a nostalgic glow or imprinted by lessons hard won.

In this new collection, Peg Meier explores the themes of childhood--the bitter and the sweet. Thanks to Minnesotans who took the time to write, whether as children in the moment or as adults looking back, Meier unearthed a wealth of material on the subject, ranging from diary entries to reminiscences to newspaper columns, along with plenty of photographs.

Coco Irvine, a child of St. Paul's Summit Avenue, writes of romance during her teen years. A YMCA coach recounts his efforts to help rowdy boys choose basketball over petty crime. Parents through the ages consider conflicting advice for raising their children. Humorous touches and reality checks are offered in equal doses, and the result is a fascinating spectrum of experiences, as Minnesotans do what everyone must: grow up.

Peg Meier, a longtime and award-winning reporter for the Minneapolis Star Tribune, is the author of Too Hot, Went to Lake: Seasonal Photos from Minnesota's Past and Bring Warm Clothes: Letters and Photos from Minnesota's Past.

Born to Buy: A Groundbreaking Exposé of a Marketing Culture That Makes Children
Born to Buy
A Groundbreaking Exposé of a Marketing Culture That Makes Children "believe They Are What They Own." (USA Today)
Paperback      ISBN: 0684870568

Marketing targeted at kids is virtually everywhere -- in classrooms and textbooks, on the Internet, even at Girl Scout meetings, slumber parties, and the playground. Product placement and other innovations have introduced more subtle advertising to movies and television. Drawing on her own survey research and unprecedented access to the advertising industry, Juliet B. Schor, New York Times bestselling author of The Overworked American, examines how marketing efforts of vast size, scope, and effectiveness have created "commercialized children." Ads and their messages about sex, drugs, and food affect not just what children want to buy, but who they think they are. In this groundbreaking and crucial book, Schor looks at the consequences of the commercialization of childhood and provides guidelines for parents and teachers. What is at stake is the emotional and social well-being of our children.
Like Barbara Ehrenreich's Nickel and Dimed, Mary Pipher's Reviving Ophelia, and Malcolm Gladwell's The Tipping Point, Born to Buy is a major contribution to our understanding of a contemporary trend and its effects on the culture.

Class War: The Privatization of Childhood
Class War
The Privatization of Childhood
Paperback      ISBN: 1781689482
What America has at stake when some children go to school hungry and others ride in $1,000 strollers

In an age of austerity, elite corporate education reformers have found new ways to transfer the costs of raising children from the state to individual families. Public schools, tasked with providing education, childcare, job training, meals, and social services to low-income children, struggle with cutbacks. Meanwhile, private schools promise to nurture the minds and personalities of future professionals to the tune of $40,000 a year. As Class War reveals, this situation didn't happen by chance.

In the media, educational success is framed as a consequence of parental choices and natural abilities. In truth the wealthy are ever more able to secure advantages for their children, deepening the rifts between rich and poor. The longer these divisions persist, the worse the consequences.

Drawing on Erickson's own experience as a teacher in the New York City school system, Class War reveals how modern education has become the real "hunger games," stealing opportunity and hope from disadvantaged children for the benefit of the well-to-do.