Sociology and Cultural Studies, General
Featured Items
How to Make the World a Better Place: 116 Ways You Can Make a Difference
How to Make the World a Better Place
116 Ways You Can Make a Difference
Paperback      ISBN: 0393312917

The twenty-fifth anniversary of Earth Day finds us all more socially and environmentally conscious than ever before. All it takes for you to make a difference is one first step--this book gives you the advice, the encouragement, the information, and the resources you need to take it. Then, instead of simply thinking about the world's problems, you'll be solving them.
An Invitation to Reflexive Sociology
An Invitation to Reflexive Sociology
Paperback      ISBN: 0226067416

Over the last three decades, the French sociologist Pierre Bourdieu has produced one of the most imaginative and subtle bodies of social theory and research of the post war era. Yet, despite the influence of his work, no single introduction to his wide-ranging oeuvre is available. This book, intended for an English-speaking audience, offers a systematic and accessible overview, providing interpretive keys to the internal logic of Bourdieu's work by explicating thematic and methodological principles underlying his work.

The structure of Bourdieu's theory of knowledge, practice, and society is first dissected by Loic Wacquant; he then collaborates with Bourdieu in a dialogue in which they discuss central concepts of Bourdieu's work, confront the main objections and criticisms his work has met, and outline Bourdieu's views of the relation of sociology to philosophy, economics, history, and politics. The final section captures Bourdieu in action in the seminar room as he addresses the topic of how to practice the craft of reflexive sociology. Throughout, they stress Bourdieu's emphasis on reflexivity--his inclusion of a theory of intellectual practice as an integral component of a theory of society--and on method--particularly his manner of posing problems that permits a transfer of knowledge from one area of inquiry into another.

Amplified by notes and an extensive bibliography, this synthetic view is essential reading for both students and advanced scholars.
Dumbing Down: Essays on the Strip-Mining of American Culture
Dumbing Down
Essays on the Strip-Mining of American Culture
Paperback      ISBN: 0393317234

With vigor, wit, learning, common sense, and urgency, twenty-three essayist--including John Simon, Cynthia Ozick, Phillip Lopate, George F. Kennan, Sven Birkerts, Joseph Epstein, and Brad Leithauser--examine aspects of our pan-cultural "dumbing down" and offer both diagnoses of and possible cures for this wasting disease.

Reefer Madness: A History of Marijuana
Reefer Madness
A History of Marijuana
Paperback      ISBN: 0312195230

Reefer Madness, a classic in the annals of hemp literature, is the popular social history of marijuana use in America. Beginning with the hemp farming if George Washington, author Larry "Ratso" Sloman traces the fascinating story of our nation's love-hate relationship with the resilient weed we know as marijuana.

Herein we find antiheroes such as Allen Ginsberg, Robert Mitchum (the first Hollywood actor busted for pot), Louis Armstrong (who smoked pot every day), the Beatles, and more rapscallions standing up for, supporting, smoking, and politicizing the bounties of marijuana.

With a new afterword by Michael Simmons, who has written for Rolling Stone, LA Weekly, and High Times, on the progress of the hemp movement and the importance of medical marijuana, Reefer Madness is a classic that goes on.

The Condition of Postmodernity: An Enquiry Into the Origins of Cultural Change
The Condition of Postmodernity
An Enquiry Into the Origins of Cultural Change
Paperback      ISBN: 0631162941

In this new book, David Harvey seeks to determine what is meant by the term in its different contexts and to identify how accurate and useful it is as a description of contemporary experience.

Closing of the American Mind
Closing of the American Mind
Paperback      ISBN: 0671657151

"THE BRILLIANT AND CONTROVERSIAL CRITIQUE OF AMERICAN CULTURE WITH NEARLY A MILLION COPIES IN PRINT"

In 1987, eminent political philosopher Allan Bloom published "The Closing of the American Mind," an appraisal of contemporary America that "hits with the approximate force and effect of electroshock therapy" ("The New York Times") and has not only been vindicated, but has also become more urgent today. In clear, spirited prose, Bloom argues that the social and political crises of contemporary America are part of a larger intellectual crisis: the result of a dangerous narrowing of curiosity and exploration by the university elites.

Now, in this twenty-fifth anniversary edition, acclaimed author and journalist Andrew Ferguson contributes a new essay that describes why Bloom's argument caused such a furor at publication and why our culture so deeply resists its truths today.

Absinthe: History in a Bottle
Absinthe
History in a Bottle
Paperback      ISBN: 0811816508

One hundred forty-four proof, notoriously addictive, and the drug of choice for nineteenth-century poets, absinthe is gaining bootleg popularity after almost a century of being banned. Due to popular demand, Absinthe: History in a Bottle is back in paperback with a handsome new cover. Like the author's bestselling The Martini and The Cigar, it is a potent brew of wild nights and social history, fact and trivia, gorgeous art and beautiful artifacts. As intoxicating as its subject, Absinthe makes a memorable gift for anyone who knows how to celebrate vice.

Morrie in His Own Words
Morrie in His Own Words
Paperback      ISBN: 0385318790

""Learn how to live and you'll know how to die; learn how to die, and you'll know how to live.""
In these remarkable pages are the profound, life-affirming words of Morrie Schwartz as he faced his own imminent death.
In 1994, at the age of seventy-seven, Schwartz learned he had ALS, commonly known as Lou Gehrig's disease. Undaunted, the former professor embraced his illness, choosing to live passionately and calmly until the end. He also embarked on his greatest teaching adventure: sharing his evolving knowledge of living while dying.
With warmth, wisdom, and humor, Morrie reveals how to:
-- live fully in the moment
-- tap into the powers of the mind to transcend physical limitations
-- grieve for your losses
-- reach out to family and friends
-- develop an inner space for meditation and spiritual connection.
It's never too late to become the kind of person you'd like to be. Morrie shows the way in his magnificent legacy of love, forgiveness, transcendence, and redemption, a guide to living fully to the end of your days.
Morrie's willingness to talk about his illness made him an inspiration. In 1995 "Nightline" ran three interviews in which Ted Koppel spoke to Morrie about life, death and the disease that was afflicting his body.
In "Morrie: In His Own Words, " Morrie combined inspiring lessons with practical advice to help those who have chronic or terminal sickness and to help those close to them maintain healthy emotions and loving relationships. As life-affirming as it is life-releasing, "Morrie: In His Own Words" will have a profound effect on generations of readers.

Envisioning Information
Envisioning Information
Hardcover      ISBN: 0961392118
America Calling: A Social History of the Telephone to 1940
America Calling
A Social History of the Telephone to 1940
Paperback      ISBN: 0520086473

The telephone looms large in our lives, as ever present in modern societies as cars and television. Claude Fischer presents the first social history of this vital but little-studied technology--how we encountered, tested, and ultimately embraced it with enthusiasm. Using telephone ads, oral histories, telephone industry correspondence, and statistical data, Fischer's work is a colorful exploration of how, when, and why Americans started communicating in this radically new manner.

Studying three California communities, Fischer uncovers how the telephone became integrated into the private worlds and community activities of average Americans in the first decades of this century. Women were especially avid in their use, a phenomenon which the industry first vigorously discouraged and then later wholeheartedly promoted. Again and again Fischer finds that the telephone supported a wide-ranging network of social relations and played a crucial role in community life, especially for women, from organizing children's relationships and church activities to alleviating the loneliness and boredom of rural life.

Deftly written and meticulously researched, America Calling adds an important new chapter to the social history of our nation and illuminates a fundamental aspect of cultural modernism that is integral to contemporary life.