Sociology
Featured Items
A History of Private Life: Riddles of Identity in Modern Times
A History of Private Life
Riddles of Identity in Modern Times
Hardcover      ISBN: 067439979x
The Psychedelic Reader: Selected from the Psychedelic Review
The Psychedelic Reader
Selected from the Psychedelic Review
Paperback      ISBN: 0806514515
There Are No Children Here: The Story of Two Boys Growing Up in the Other America
There Are No Children Here
The Story of Two Boys Growing Up in the Other America
Paperback      ISBN: 0385265565
A touching, meticulous portrait of two boys growing up in a Chicago housing project reveals how they help each other maintain a shred of innocence among street gangs, gunfire, violence, and drugs. Reprint.
The Way We Never Were: American Families and the Nostalgia Trap
The Way We Never Were
American Families and the Nostalgia Trap
Paperback      ISBN: 0465090974
Looks at two centuries of American family life and shatters myths and misconceptions about the past
Mexican-American Folklore
Mexican-American Folklore
Paperback      ISBN: 0874830591
Gathers riddles, rhymes, folk poetry, stories, ballads, superstitions, customs, games, foods, and folk arts of the Mexican-Americans
The City in History: Its Origins, Its Transformations, and Its Prospects
The City in History
Its Origins, Its Transformations, and Its Prospects
Paperback      ISBN: 0156180359
An examination of Cities of the Western world tracing their development from Egypt through the Middle Ages to the present
Love
Love
Paperback      ISBN: 014044307x
The nineteenth-century French master combined personal comment and detached analysis in this exploration of the aspects, stages, and varieties of love, particularly passionate, romantic, unrequited love, and the imagination's power to transfigure love's object and energies.
How to Lie With Statistics
How to Lie With Statistics
Paperback      ISBN: 0393310728
Darrell Huff runs the gamut of every popularly used type of statistic, probes such things as the sample study, the tabulation method, the interview technique, or the way results are derived from the figures, and points up the countless number of dodges which are used to fool rather than to inform.
Cities and the Wealth of Nations: Principles of Economic Life
Cities and the Wealth of Nations
Principles of Economic Life
Paperback      ISBN: 0394729110
"Learned, iconoclastic and exciting...Jacobs' diagnosis of the decay of cities in an increasingly integrated world economy is on the mark."—New York Times Book Review "Jacobs' book is inspired, idiosyncratic and personal...It is written with verve and humor; for a work of embattled theory, it is wonderfully concrete, and its leaps are breathtaking."—Los Angeles Times "Not only comprehensible but entertaining...Like Mrs. Jacobs' other books, it offers a concrete approach to an abstract and elusive subject. That, all by itself, makes for an intoxicating experience."—New York Times
Crofter and the Laird
Crofter and the Laird
Paperback      ISBN: 0374514658
When John McPhee returned to the island of his ancestors—Colonsay, twenty-five miles west of the Scottish mainland—a hundred and thirty-eight people were living there. About eighty of these, crofters and farmers, had familial histories of unbroken residence on the island for two or three hundred years; the rest, including the English laird who owned Colonsay, were “incomers.” Donald McNeill, the crofter of the title, was working out his existence in this last domain of the feudal system; the laird, the fourth Baron Strathcona, lived in Bath, appeared on Colonsay mainly in the summer, and accepted with nonchalance the fact that he was the least popular man on the island he owned. While comparing crofter and laird, McPhee gives readers a deep and rich portrait of the terrain, the history, the legends, and the people of this fragment of the Hebrides. When John McPhee returned to the island of his ancestors—Colonsay, twenty-five miles west of the Scottish mainland—a hundred and thirty-eight people were living there. About eighty of these, crofters and farmers, had familial histories of unbroken residence on the island for two or three hundred years; the rest, including the English laird who owned Colonsay, were “incomers.” Donald McNeill, the crofter of the title, was working out his existence in this last domain of the feudal system; the laird, the fourth Baron Strathcona, lived in Bath, appeared on Colonsay mainly in the summer, and accepted with nonchalance the fact that he was the least popular man on the island he owned. While comparing crofter and laird, McPhee gives readers a deep and rich portrait of the terrain, the history, the legends, and the people of this fragment of the Hebrides.