Mexico
Dealing Death and Drugs: The Big Business of Dope in the U.S. and Mexico: An Argument to End the Prohibition of Marijuana
Dealing Death and Drugs: The Big Business of Dope in the U.S. and Mexico
An Argument to End the Prohibition of Marijuana
Paperback      ISBN: 1933693940

The War on Drugs doesn't work. This became obvious to El Paso City Representatives Susie Byrd and Beto O'Rourke when they started to ask questions about why El Paso's sister city Ciudad Ju rez has become the deadliest city in the world--8,000-plus deaths since January 1, 2008. Byrd and O'Rourke soon realized American drug use and United States' failed War on Drugs are at the core of problem. In Dealing Death and Drugs -- a book written for the general reader -- they explore the costs and consequences of marijuana prohibition. They argue that marijuana prohibition has created a black market so profitable that drug kingpins are billionaires and drug control doesn't stand a chance. Using Ju rez as their focus, they describe the business model of drug trafficking and explain why this illicit system has led to the never-ending slaughter of human beings. Their position: the only rational alternative to the War on Drugs is to end to the current prohibition on marijuana.

"If Washington won't do anything different, if Mexico City won't do anything different, then it is up to us -- the citizens of the border who understand the futility and tragedy of this current policy first hand -- to lead the way." -- from the Afterword

A portion of the proceeds from the sale of Dealing Death and Drugs will be donated to Centro Santa Catalina, a faith-based community in Ciudad Ju rez, Mexico, founded in 1996 by Dominican Sisters for the spiritual, educational and economic empowerment of economically poor women and for the welfare of their families.
Defending the Land of the Jaguar: A History of Conservation in Mexico
Defending the Land of the Jaguar
A History of Conservation in Mexico
Paperback      ISBN: 0292776918

Mexican conservationists have sometimes observed that it is difficult to find a country less interested in the conservation of its natural resources than is Mexico. Yet, despite a long history dedicated to the pursuit of development regardless of its environmental consequences, Mexico has an equally long, though much less developed and appreciated, tradition of environmental conservation.

Lane Simonian here offers the first panoramic history of conservation in Mexico from pre-contact times to the current Mexican environmental movement. He explores the origins of conservation and environmental concerns in Mexico, the philosophies and endeavors of Mexican conservationists, and the enactment of important conservation laws and programs. This heretofore untold story, drawn from interviews with leading Mexican conservationists as well as archival research, will be important reading throughout the international community of activists, researchers, and concerned citizens interested in the intertwined issues of conservation and development.

Delirio--The Fantastic, the Demonic, and the Reel: The Buried History of Nuevo Leon
Delirio--The Fantastic, the Demonic, and the Reel
The Buried History of Nuevo Leon
1st Edition    Paperback      ISBN: 029273462x

Striking, inexplicable stories circulate among the people of Nuevo Leon in northern Mexico. Stories of conversos (converted Jews) who fled the Inquisition in Spain and became fabulously wealthy in Mexico. Stories of women and children buried in walls and under houses. Stories of an entire, secret city hidden under modern-day Monterrey. All these stories have no place or corroboration in the official histories of Nuevo Leon.

In this pioneering ethnography, Marie Theresa Hernandez explores how the folktales of Nuevo Leon encode aspects of Nuevolenese identity that have been lost, repressed, or fetishized in "legitimate" histories of the region. She focuses particularly on stories regarding three groups: the Sephardic Jews said to be the "original" settlers of the region, the "disappeared" indigenous population, and the supposed "barbaric" society that persists in modern Nuevo Leon. Hernandez's explorations into these stories uncover the region's complicated history, as well as the problematic and often fascinating relationship between history and folklore, between officially accepted "facts" and "fictions" that many Nuevoleneses believe as truth.

The Devastation of the Indies: A Brief Account
The Devastation of the Indies
A Brief Account
Paperback      ISBN: 0801844304

Five hundred years after Columbus's first voyage to the New World, the debate over the European impact on Native American civilization has grown more heated than ever. Among the first--and most insistent--voices raised in that debate was that of a Spanish priest, Bartolome de Las Casas, acquaintance of Cortes and Pizarro and shipmate of Velasquez on the voyage to conquer Cuba. In 1552, after forty years of witnessing--and opposing--countless acts of brutality in the new Spanish colonies, Las Casas returned to Seville, where he published a book that caused a storm of controversy that persists to the present day. The Devastation of the Indies is an eyewitness account of the first modern genocide, a story of greed, hypocrisy, and cruelties so grotesque as to rival the worst of our own century. Las Casas writes of men, women, and children burned alive "thirteen at a time in memory of Our Redeemer and his twelve apostles." He describes butcher shops that sold human flesh for dog food ("Give me a quarter of that rascal there, " one customer says, "until I can kill some more of my own"). Slave ship captains navigate "without need of compass or charts, " following instead the trail of floating corpses tossed overboard by the ship before them. Native kings are promised peace, then slaughtered. Whole families hang themselves in despair. Once-fertile islands are turned to desert, the wealth of nations plundered, millions killed outright, whole peoples annihilated. In an introduction, historian Bill M. Donovan provides a brief biography of Las Casas and reviews the controversy his work produced among Europeans, whose indignation--and denials--lasted centuries. But the book itself is short. "Were I t describe all this, " writes Las Casas of the four decades of suffering he witnessed, "no amount of time and paper could encompass this task."

Diario de Oaxaca: A Sketchbook Journal of Two Years in Mexico
Diario de Oaxaca
A Sketchbook Journal of Two Years in Mexico
Paperback      ISBN: 1629634417

Painting a vivid, personal portrait of social and political upheaval in Oaxaca, Mexico, this unique memoir employs comics, bilingual essays, photos, and sketches to chronicle the events that unfolded around a teachers' strike and led to a seven-month siege. When award-winning cartoonist Peter Kuper and his family moved to the 16th-century colonial town of Oaxaca in 2006, they planned to spend a quiet year or two enjoying a different culture and taking a break from the U.S. political climate under the Bush administration. What they hadn't counted on was landing in the epicenter of Mexico's biggest political struggle in recent years. Timely and compelling, this extraordinary firsthand account presents a distinct artistic vision of Oaxacan life, from explorations of the beauty of the environment to graphic portrayals of the fight between strikers and government troops that left more than 20 people dead, including American journalist Brad Will. This expanded paperback edition includes 32 pages of new material.

Dictablanda: Politics, Work, and Culture in Mexico, 1938-1968
Dictablanda
Politics, Work, and Culture in Mexico, 1938-1968
Paperback      ISBN: 0822356376

In 1910 Mexicans rebelled against an imperfect dictatorship; after 1940 they ended up with what some called the perfect dictatorship. A single party ruled Mexico for over seventy years, holding elections and talking about revolution while overseeing one of the world's most inequitable economies. The contributors to this groundbreaking collection revise earlier interpretations, arguing that state power was not based exclusively on hegemony, corporatism, or violence. Force was real, but it was also exercised by the ruled. It went hand-in-hand with consent, produced by resource regulation, political pragmatism, local autonomies and a popular veto. The result was a dictablanda a soft authoritarian regime.

This deliberately heterodox volume brings together social historians, anthropologists, sociologists, and political scientists to offer a radical new understanding of the emergence and persistence of the modern Mexican state. It also proposes bold, multidisciplinary approaches to critical problems in contemporary politics. With its blend of contested elections, authoritarianism, and resistance, Mexico foreshadowed the hybrid regimes that have spread across much of the globe. Dictablanda suggests how they may endure.

Contributors
. Roberto Blancarte, Christopher R. Boyer, Guillermo de la Pe a, Mar a Teresa Fern ndez Aceves, Paul Gillingham, Rogelio Hern ndez Rodr guez, Alan Knight, Gladys McCormick, Tanal s Padilla, Wil G. Pansters, Andrew Paxman, Jaime Pensado, Pablo Piccato, Thomas Rath, Jeffrey W. Rubin, Benjamin T. Smith, Michael Snodgrass

The Discovery and Conquest of Mexico 1517-1521
The Discovery and Conquest of Mexico 1517-1521
Paperback      ISBN: 030681319x

Bernal D az del Castillo (14951584) served under Cort s through the entire Mexican campaign, and his narrative is both an invaluable document and a spectacular epic. Del Castillo saw Cort s sink his own ships (to prevent desertion) as soon as they landed on Mexican soil, and watched Montezuma become a prisoner in his own palace. The immediacy of his voice as translated by renowned scholar A.P. Maudslay reaches across the centuries to invite readers to witness for themselves the horrors and wonders of the initial, apocalyptic clash between two great civilizations.

Drinking, Homicide, and Rebellion in Colonial Mexican Villages
Drinking, Homicide, and Rebellion in Colonial Mexican Villages
Paperback      ISBN: 0804711127

This study analyzes the impact of Spanish rule on Indian peasant identity in the late colonial period by investigating three areas of social behavior. Based on the criminal trial records and related documents from the regions of central Mexico and Oaxaca, it attempts to discover how peasants conceived of their role under Spanish rule, how they behaved under various kinds of street, and how they felt about their Spanish overlords. In examining the character of village uprisings, typical relationships between killers and the people they killed, and the drinking patterns of the late colonial period, the author finds no warrant for the familiar picture of sullen depredation and despair. Landed peasants of colonial Mexico drank moderately on the whole, and mostly on ritual occasions; they killed for personal and not political reasons. Only when new Spanish encroachments threatened their lands and livelihoods did their grievances flare up in rebellion, and these occasions were numerous but brief. The author bolsters his conclusions with illuminating comparisons with other peasant societies.

Early Churches of Mexico: An Architect's View
Early Churches of Mexico
An Architect's View
Hardcover      ISBN: 0826358179

Following the Spanish conquest of Mexico in the early 1500s, Franciscan, Dominican, and Augustinian friars fanned out across the central and southern areas of the country, founding hundreds of mission churches and monasteries to evangelize the Native population. This book documents more than 120 of these remarkable sixteenth-century sites in duotone black-and-white photographs.

Virtually unknown outside Mexico, these complexes unite architecture, landscape, mural painting, and sculpture on a grand scale, in some ways rivaling the archaeological sites of the Maya and Aztecs. They represent a fascinating period in history when two distinct cultures began interweaving to form the fabric of modern Mexico. Many were founded on the sites of ancient temples and reused their masonry, and they were ornamented with architectural murals and sculptures that owe much to the existing Native tradition--almost all the construction was done by indigenous artisans.

With these photos, Spears celebrates this unique architectural and cultural heritage to help ensure its protection and survival.

Eclipse of the Assassins: The Cia, Imperial Politics, and the Slaying of Mexican Journalist Manuel Buendía
Eclipse of the Assassins
The Cia, Imperial Politics, and the Slaying of Mexican Journalist Manuel Buendía
Hardcover      ISBN: 0299306402

This is a stellar, courageous work of investigative journalism and historical scholarship grippingly told, meticulously documented, and doggedly pursued over thirty years. Tracking a Cold War confrontation that has compromised the national interests of both Mexico and the United States, Eclipse of the Assassins exposes deadly connections among historical events usually remembered as isolated episodes.
Authors Russell and Sylvia Bartley shed new light on the U.S.-instigated dirty wars that ravaged all of Latin America in the 1960s, 70s, and 80s and reveal for the first time how Mexican officials colluded with Washington in its proxy contra war against the Sandinista government of Nicaragua. They draw together the strands of a clandestine web linking:

  • the assassination of prominent Mexican journalist Manuel Buendia
  • the torture and murder of U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration agent Enrique Camarena
  • the Iran-Contra scandal
  • a major DEA sting against key CIA-linked Bolivian, Panamanian, and Mexican drug traffickers
  • CIA-orchestrated suppression of investigative journalists
  • criminal collusion of successive U.S. and Mexican administrations that has resulted in the unprecedented power of drug kingpins like El Chapo Guzman.
Eclipse of the Assassins places a major political crime the murder of Buendia in its full historical perspective and shows how the dirty wars of the past are still claiming victims today.
Best books for public & secondary school libraries from university presses, American Library Association"