Mexico
Bad Language, Naked Ladies, and Other Threats to the Nation: A Political History of Comic Books in Mexico
Bad Language, Naked Ladies, and Other Threats to the Nation
A Political History of Comic Books in Mexico
Paperback      ISBN: 0822321416

In Bad Language, Naked Ladies, and Other Threats to the Nation, Anne Rubenstein examines how comic books-which were overwhelmingly popular but extremely controversial in post-revolutionary Mexico-played an important role in the development of a stable, legitimate state. Studying the relationship of the Mexican state to its civil society from the 1930s to the 1970s through comic books and their producers, readers, and censors, Rubenstein shows how these thrilling tales of adventure-and the debates over them-reveal much about Mexico's cultural nationalism and government attempts to direct, if not control, social change.
Since their first appearance in 1934, comic books enjoyed wide readership, often serving as a practical guide to life in booming new cities. Conservative protest against the so-called immorality of these publications, of mass media generally, and of Mexican modernity itself, however, led the Mexican government to establish a censorship office that, while having little impact on the content of comic books, succeeded in directing conservative ire away from government policies and toward the Mexican media. Bad Language, Naked Ladies, and Other Threats to the Nation examines the complex dynamics of the politics of censorship occasioned by Mexican comic books, including the conservative political campaigns against them, government and industrial responses to such campaigns, and the publishers' championing of Mexican nationalism and their efforts to preserve their publishing empires through informal influence over government policies. Rubenstein's analysis suggests a new Mexican history after the revolution, one in which negotiation over cultural questions replaced open conflict and mass-media narrative helped ensure political stability.
This book will engage readers with an interest in Mexican history, Latin American studies, cultural studies, and popular culture.

Baja California Land of Missions
Baja California Land of Missions
Paperback      ISBN: 1495191214

This book contains a detailed history of the activities by the Spanish and others attempting to colonize the peninsula of California from 1535 to 1855. Over 125 photographs, maps, and drawings, provide the reader with a view of the actions of the Spanish Empire using missions to colonize California. The author's research resulted in new discoveries and facts which are included in this look at the history and the present conditions of the twenty-seven peninsula missions; many relocated to multiple sites. The nearly 200 missionaries who served in Baja California between 1683 and 1855 are also named. This book covers the period from the discovery of California in the 1530s through the establishment of all twenty-seven missions in Baja California to when the last missionaries left in 1855.This guidebook is glovebox or backpack friendly and contains the GPS waypoints for the mission sites. The book is made to be easy to use, easy to read and contains a full list of reference books in back, as well as an index.

Barbarous Mexico
Barbarous Mexico
Paperback      ISBN: 0292707371

An early 20th century American journalist's articles on Mexico before the Revolution.

Bearing Arms for His Majesty: The Free-Colored Militia in Colonial Mexico
Bearing Arms for His Majesty
The Free-Colored Militia in Colonial Mexico
Paperback      ISBN: 0804750246

This study uses the participation of free colored men, whether mulatos, pardos, or morenos (i.e., Afro-Spaniards, Afro-Indians, or "pure blacks"), in New Spain's militias as a prism for examining race relations, racial identity, racial categorization, and issues of social mobility for racially stigmatized groups in colonial Mexico. By 1793, nearly 10 percent of New Spain's population was made up of people who could trace some African ancestry--people subject to more legal disabilities and social discrimination than mestizos, who in turn fell below white creoles, who in turn fell below the Spanish-born, in the stratified and caste-like society of colonial Spanish America. The originality of this study lies in approaching race via a single, important institution, the military, rather than via abstractions or examples taken from particular regions or single runs of legal documents. By exploring the lives of tens of thousands of part-time and full-time free colored soldiers, who served the colony as volunteers or conscripts, and by adopting a multi-regional approach, the author is able not only to show how military institutions evolved with reference to race and vice versa, but to do so in a manner that reveals discontinuities and regional differences as well as historical trends. He also is able to examine black lives beyond the institution of slavery and to achieve a more nuanced impression of the meaning of freedom in colonial times. From the 1550s on, free colored forces figured prominently in the colony's military forces, and units of free colored soldiers evolved with increasing autonomy in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. The author concludes, however, that the Bourbon reforms of the 1760s--which clearly expanded the military establishment and the role of Spanish soldiers born in the New World--came at the expense of free colored companies, which experienced a reduction in both numbers and institutional privileges.

Bernardino de Sahagun: First Anthropologist
Bernardino de Sahagun
First Anthropologist
Paperback      ISBN: 0806142715

He was sent from Spain on a religious crusade to Mexico to "detect the sickness of idolatry," but Bernardino de Sahag n (c. 1499-1590) instead became the first anthropologist of the New World. The Franciscan monk developed a deep appreciation for Aztec culture and the Nahuatl language. In this biography, Miguel Le n-Portilla presents the life story of a fascinating man who came to Mexico intent on changing the traditions and cultures he encountered but instead ended up working to preserve them, even at the cost of persecution.

Sahag n was responsible for documenting numerous ancient texts and other native testimonies. He persevered in his efforts to study the native Aztecs until he had developed his own research methodology, becoming a pioneer of anthropology. Sahag n formed a school of Nahua scribes and labored with them for more than sixty years to transcribe the pre-conquest language and culture of the Nahuas. His rich legacy, our most comprehensive account of the Aztecs, is contained in his Primeros Memoriales (1561) and Historia General de las Cosas de Nueva Espa a (1577).

Near the end of his life at age 91, Sahag n became so protective of the Aztecs that when he died, his former Indian students and many others felt deeply affected.

Translated into English by Mauricio J. Mixco, Le n-Portilla's absorbing account presents Sahag n as a complex individual-a man of his times yet a pioneer in many ways.

Bordering on Chaos: Mexico's Roller-Coaster Journey Toward Prosperity
Bordering on Chaos
Mexico's Roller-Coaster Journey Toward Prosperity
Paperback      ISBN: 0316650250

A political examination of contemporary Mexico

Bridging National Borders in North America: Transnational and Comparative Histories
Bridging National Borders in North America
Transnational and Comparative Histories
Paperback      ISBN: 0822346990

Despite a shared interest in using borders to explore the paradoxes of state-making and national histories, historians of the U.S.-Canada border region and those focused on the U.S.-Mexico borderlands have generally worked in isolation from one another. A timely and important addition to borderlands history, Bridging National Borders in North America initiates a conversation between scholars of the continent's northern and southern borderlands. The historians in this collection examine borderlands events and phenomena from the mid-nineteenth century through the mid-twentieth. Some consider the U.S.-Canada border, others concentrate on the U.S.-Mexico border, and still others take both regions into account.

The contributors engage topics such as how mixed-race groups living on the peripheries of national societies dealt with the creation of borders in the nineteenth century, how medical inspections and public-health knowledge came to be used to differentiate among bodies, and how practices designed to channel livestock and prevent cattle smuggling became the model for regulating the movement of narcotics and undocumented people. They explore the ways that U.S. immigration authorities mediated between the desires for unimpeded boundary-crossings for day laborers, tourists, casual visitors, and businessmen, and the restrictions imposed by measures such as the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882 and the 1924 Immigration Act. Turning to the realm of culture, they analyze the history of tourist travel to Mexico from the United States and depictions of the borderlands in early-twentieth-century Hollywood movies. The concluding essay suggests that historians have obscured non-national forms of territoriality and community that preceded the creation of national borders and sometimes persisted afterwards. This collection signals new directions for continental dialogue about issues such as state-building, national expansion, territoriality, and migration.

Contributors Dominique Br gent-Heald, Catherine Cocks, Andrea Geiger, Miguel ngel Gonz lez Quiroga, Andrew R. Graybill, Michel Hogue, Benjamin H. Johnson, S. Deborah Kang, Carolyn Podruchny, Bethel Saler, Jennifer Seltz, Rachel St. John, Lissa Wadewitz

Published in cooperation with the William P. Clements Center for Southwest Studies, Southern Methodist University.

A Brief History of Mexico
A Brief History of Mexico
4th Edition    Paperback      ISBN: 0816074062

Cover the developments in Mexico. This title includes: Mexico's pre-Columbian civilizations as well as contemporary indigenous cultures; The environment; North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA); and, The war on the drug cartels.

Chocolate and Corn Flour: History, Race, and Place in the Making of
Chocolate and Corn Flour
History, Race, and Place in the Making of "black" Mexico
Paperback      ISBN: 0822351323

Located on Mexico's Pacific coast in a historically black part of the Costa Chica region, the town of San Nicol s has been identified as a center of Afromexican culture by Mexican cultural authorities, journalists, activists, and foreign anthropologists. The majority of the town's residents, however, call themselves morenos (black Indians). In Chocolate and Corn Flour, Laura A. Lewis explores the history and contemporary culture of San Nicol s, focusing on the ways that local inhabitants experience and understand race, blackness, and indigeneity, as well as on the cultural values that outsiders place on the community and its residents.

Drawing on more than a decade of fieldwork, Lewis offers a richly detailed and subtle ethnography of the lives and stories of the people of San Nicol s, including community residents who have migrated to the United States. San Nicoladenses, she finds, have complex attitudes toward blackness-as a way of identifying themselves and as a racial and cultural category. They neither consider themselves part of an African diaspora nor deny their heritage. Rather, they acknowledge their hybridity and choose to identify most deeply with their community.

The City of Mexico in the Age of Diaz
The City of Mexico in the Age of Diaz
Paperback      ISBN: 0292740484

Mexico City assumed its current character around the turn of the twentieth century, during the dictatorship of Porfirio Diaz (1876-1911). In those years, wealthy Mexicans moved away from the Zocalo, the city's traditional center, to western suburbs where they sought to imitate European and American ways of life. At the same time, poorer Mexicans, many of whom were peasants, crowded into eastern suburbs that lacked such basic amenities as schools, potable water, and adequate sewerage. These slums looked and felt more like rural villages than city neighborhoods. A century--and some twenty million more inhabitants--later, Mexico City retains its divided, robust, and almost labyrinthine character.

In this provocative and beautifully written book, Michael Johns proposes to fathom the character of Mexico City and, through it, the Mexican national character that shaped and was shaped by the capital city. Drawing on sources from government documents to newspapers to literary works, he looks at such things as work, taste, violence, architecture, and political power during the formative Diaz era. From this portrait of daily life in Mexico City, he shows us the qualities that "make a Mexican a Mexican" and have created a culture in which, as the Mexican saying goes, "everything changes so that everything remains the same."