Chinese History
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Leaving Mother Lake: A Girlhood at the Edge of the World
Leaving Mother Lake
A Girlhood at the Edge of the World
Paperback      ISBN: 0316735493

The haunting memoir of a girl growing up in the Moso country in the Himalayas -- a unique matrilineal society. But even in this land of women, familial tension is eternal. Namu is a strong-willed daughter, and conflicts between her and her rebellious mother lead her to break the taboo that holds the Moso world together -- she leaves her mother's house.

Peking Story: The Last Days of Old China
Peking Story
The Last Days of Old China
Paperback      ISBN: 1590170407

For two years before and after the 1948 Communist Revolution, David Kidd lived in Peking, where he married the daughter of an aristocratic Chinese family. "I used to hope," he writes, "that some bright young scholar on a research grant would write about us and our Chinese friends before it was too late and we were all dead and gone, folding into the darkness the wonder that had been our lives." Here Kidd himself brings that wonder to life.

Inmost Shrine: A Photographic Odyssey of China, 1873
Inmost Shrine
A Photographic Odyssey of China, 1873
Hardcover      ISBN: 1929154380
Action in Late Ming Thought: The Reorientation of Lü K'Un and Other Scholar-Officials
Action in Late Ming Thought
The Reorientation of Lü K'Un and Other Scholar-Officials
Hardcover      ISBN: 0520043804
Red China Blues: My Long March from Mao to Now
Red China Blues
My Long March from Mao to Now
Paperback      ISBN: 0385482329

Jan Wong, a Canadian of Chinese descent, went to China as a starry-eyed Maoist in 1972 at the height of the Cultural Revolution. A true believer--and one of only two Westerners permitted to enroll at Beijing University--her education included wielding a pneumatic drill at the Number One Machine Tool Factory. In the name of the Revolution, she renounced rock & roll, hauled pig manure in the paddy fields, and turned in a fellow student who sought her help in getting to the United States. She also met and married the only American draft dodger from the Vietnam War to seek asylum in China.

Red China Blues is Wong's startling--and ironic--memoir of her rocky six-year romance with Maoism (which crumbled as she became aware of the harsh realities of Chinese communism); her dramatic firsthand account of the devastating Tiananmen Square uprising; and her engaging portrait of the individuals and events she covered as a correspondent in China during the tumultuous era of capitalist reform under Deng Xiaoping. In a frank, captivating, deeply personal narrative she relates the horrors that led to her disillusionment with the "worker's paradise." And through the stories of the people--an unhappy young woman who was sold into marriage, China's most famous dissident, a doctor who lengthens penises--Wong reveals long-hidden dimensions of the world's most populous nation.

In setting out to show readers in the Western world what life is like in China, and why we should care, she reacquaints herself with the old friends--and enemies of her radical past, and comes to terms with the legacy of her ancestral homeland.
Hungry Ghosts: Mao's Secret Famine
Hungry Ghosts
Mao's Secret Famine
Paperback      ISBN: 0805056688

In the late 1950s and early 1960s, the Chinese people suffered what may have been the worst famine in history. Over thirty million perished in a grain shortage brought on not by flood, drought, or infestation, but by the insanely irresponsible dictates of Chairman Mao Ze-dong's "Great Leap Forward," an attempt at utopian engineering gone horribly wrong.

Journalist Jasper Becker conducted hundreds of interviews and spent years immersed in painstaking detective work to produce Hungry Ghosts, the first full account of this dark chapter in Chinese history. In this horrific story of state-sponsored terror, cannibalism, torture, and murder, China's communist leadership boasted of record harvests and actually increased grain exports, while refusing imports and international assistance. With China's reclamation of Hong Kong now a fait accompli, removing the historical blinders is more timely than ever. As reviewer Richard Bernstein wrote in the New York Times, "Mr. Becker's remarkable book...strikes a heavy blow against willed ignorance of what took place."

The Terracotta Warriors: The Secret Codes of the Emperor's Army
The Terracotta Warriors
The Secret Codes of the Emperor's Army
Hardcover      ISBN: 159143033x

Explains esoteric secrets of the sacred solar science encoded in the massive army of terracotta warriors that guards the tomb of Chinese emperor Ch'in Shi Huangdi

- Decodes the farewell message of the first emperor of China concealed more than 2,000 years ago in the 8,000 terracotta warriors that guard his tomb

- Shows the spiritual principles of this sacred solar science and its remarkable insights into heaven, hell, and the immortality of the soul

- Latest book by the bestselling author of The Tutankhamun Prophecies and The Lost Tomb of Viracocha

When the first emperor of unified China, Ch'in Shi Huangdi, felt his death approaching, he decreed that he be entombed within a pyramid and that his tomb be protected by an immortal army of terracotta soldiers. In 1974 archaeologists discovered the first of more than 8,000 life-size terracotta warriors, each weighing half a ton, buried circa 220 B.C.E. near this emperor's pyramid tomb. Maurice Cotterell shows how Shi Huangdi--like the pharaoh Tutankhamun, the Mayan lord Pacal, and Viracocha in Peru--was a keeper of the sacred solar science of the ancients, a science that included a sophisticated understanding of the effect of the sun on earthly affairs, fertility rates, and personality. The keepers of this science taught that the soul was immortal and was destined to transform into star energy or be reborn on Earth, depending on an individual's spiritual progress in his or her lifetime. Using his unique understanding of how and why ancient civilizations encoded this extraordinary knowledge, Cotterell decodes the emperor's farewell message concealed in the terracotta warriors--a message that reveals the true purpose of life and the imperishable nature of the soul.
Wild Swans: Three Daughters of China
Wild Swans
Three Daughters of China
Paperback      ISBN: 0385425473

This is a powerful, moving, at times shocking account of three generations of Chinese women, as compelling as Amy Tan. --Mary Morris. An evocative, often astonishing view of life in a changing China. -- The New York Times

Remembering China1935-1945: A Memoir
Remembering China1935-1945
A Memoir
Hardcover      ISBN: 0898231701

This captivating memoir characterizes life in China during a tumultuous period in its history. Bea Exner Liu moved to China in 1935 to teach English. She married a Chinese, and witnessed the Japanese invasion of China during the years 1935 to 1945. Using narrative and quoting the letters she wrote to her family over those ten years, Liu presents a clear and sometimes shocking picture of daily life. Chinese political structure, availability of adequate medical care, and the daily grind of raising a family during a time when bombing raids were routine are all treated with Liu's adept language and gentle humor.

Treason by the Book
Treason by the Book
Paperback      ISBN: 0142000418
"A savory, fascinating story of absolute rule, one that not only reveals a great deal about China's turbulent past but also suggests where some of the more durable reflexes of China's current leaders have their roots. . . . A detective yarn and a picaresque tale." (Richard Bernstein, The New York Times)

Shortly before noon on October 28, 1728, General Yue Zhongqi, the most powerful military and civilian official in northwest China, was en route to his headquarters. Suddenly, out of the crowd, a stranger ran toward Yue and passed him an envelope--an envelope containing details of a treasonous plot to overthrow the Manchu government.

This thrilling story of a conspiracy against the Qing dynasty in 1728 is a captivating tale of intrigue and a fascinating exploration of what it means to rule and be ruled. Once again, Jonathan Spence has created a vivid portrait of the rich culture that surrounds a most dramatic moment in Chinese history.