Jewish Cooking
100 Best Jewish Recipes: Traditional and Contemporary Kosher Cuisine from Around the World
100 Best Jewish Recipes
Traditional and Contemporary Kosher Cuisine from Around the World
Paperback      ISBN: 1566560500
100 Best Jewish Recipes: Traditional and Contemporary Kosher Cuisine from Around the World
100 Best Jewish Recipes
Traditional and Contemporary Kosher Cuisine from Around the World
Hardcover      ISBN: 156656073x

Collects one hundred of the late author's best-loved recipes, including traditional Jewish dishes, international and regional favorites, festival foods, and originally non-Jewish dishes adapted for the Jewish kitchen.

The 100 Most Jewish Foods: A Highly Debatable List
The 100 Most Jewish Foods
A Highly Debatable List
Hardcover      ISBN: 1579659063
"Your gift giv-ing prob-lems are now over--just stock up on The 100 Most Jew-ish Foods. . . . The appro-pri-ate gift for any occa-sion."
--Jewish Book Council

" A] love letter--to food, family, faith and identity, and the deliciously tangled way they come together."
--NPR's The Salt

With contributions from Ruth Reichl, ric Ripert, Joan Nathan, Michael Solomonov, Dan Barber, Yotam Ottolenghi, Tom Colicchio, Maira Kalman, Melissa Clark, and many more

Tablet's list of the 100 most Jewish foods is not about the most popular Jewish foods, or the tastiest, or even the most enduring. It's a list of the most significant foods culturally and historically to the Jewish people, explored deeply with essays, recipes, stories, and context. Some of the dishes are no longer cooked at home, and some are not even dishes in the traditional sense (store-bought cereal and Stella D'oro cookies, for example). The entire list is up for debate, which is what makes this book so much fun. Many of the foods are delicious (such as babka and shakshuka). Others make us wonder how they've survived as long as they have (such as unhatched chicken eggs and jellied calves' feet). As expected, many Jewish (and now universal) favorites like matzo balls, pickles, cheesecake, blintzes, and chopped liver make the list. The recipes are global and represent all contingencies of the Jewish experience. Contributors include Ruth Reichl, ric Ripert, Joan Nathan, Michael Solomonov, Dan Barber, Gail Simmons, Yotam Ottolenghi, Tom Colicchio, Amanda Hesser and Merrill Stubbs, Maira Kalman, Action Bronson, Daphne Merkin, Shalom Auslander, Dr. Ruth Westheimer, and Phil Rosenthal, among many others. Presented in a gifty package, The 100 Most Jewish Foods is the perfect book to dip into, quote from, cook from, and launch a spirited debate.
The 2nd Ave Deli Cookbook: Recipes and Memories from Abe Lebewohl's Legendary New York Kitchen
The 2nd Ave Deli Cookbook
Recipes and Memories from Abe Lebewohl's Legendary New York Kitchen
Hardcover      ISBN: 037550267x

The Second Avenue Deli has been an internationally renowned Gotham landmark for nearly half a century. Over the years, its founder, Abe Lebewohl, provided the best Jewish fare in town, transforming his tiny ten-seat Village eatery into a New York institution.

The Second Avenue Deli Cookbook contains more than 160 of Abe Lebewohl's recipes, including all of the Deli's peerless renditions of traditional Jewish dishes: chicken soup with matzo balls, chopped liver, gefilte fish, kasha varnishkes, mushroom barley soup, noodle kugel, potato latkes, blintzes, and many more. These versatile dishes are perfect for any occasion--from holiday dinners to Sunday brunches with friends and family.

The late Abe Lebewohl was a great restaurateur in the showman tradition and a well-known and much-loved New York personality. His famous Deli attracted hundreds of celebrity patrons, many of whom have graciously contributed to this cookbook not only personal reminiscences but also recipes, running the gamut from Morley Safer's family brisket to Paul Reiser's formula for the perfect egg cream. A wonderful blend of New York and Jewish history and mouthwatering recipes, The Second Avenue Deli Cookbook provides a delicious taste of nostalgia.
Aromas of Aleppo: The Legendary Cuisine of Syrian Jews
Aromas of Aleppo
The Legendary Cuisine of Syrian Jews
Hardcover      ISBN: 0060888180

When the Aleppian Jewish community migrated from the ancient city of Aleppo in historic Syria and settled in New York and Latin American cities in the early 20th century, it brought its rich cuisine and vibrant culture. Most Syrian recipes and traditions, however, were not written down and existed only in the minds of older generations. Poopa Dweck, a first generation Syrian-Jewish American, has devoted much of her life to preserving and celebrating her community's centuries-old legacy.

Dweck relates the history and culture of her community through its extraordinary cuisine, offering more than 180 exciting ethnic recipes with tantalizing photos and describing the unique customs that the Aleppian Jewish community observes during holidays and lifecycle events. Among the irresistible recipes are:


-Bazargan-Tangy Tamarind Bulgur Salad


-Shurbat Addes-Hearty Red Lentil Soup with Garlic and Coriander


-Kibbeh-Stuffed Syrian Meatballs with Ground Rice


-Samak b'Batata-Baked Middle Eastern Whole Fish with Potatoes


-Sambousak-Buttery Cheese-Filled Sesame Pastries


-Eras bi'Ajweh-Date-Filled Crescents


-Chai Na'na-Refreshing Mint Tea

Like mainstream Middle Eastern cuisines, Aleppian Jewish dishes are alive with flavor and healthful ingredients-featuring whole grains, vegetables, legumes, and olive oil-but with their own distinct cultural influences. In Aromas of Aleppo, cooks will discover the best of Poopa Dweck's recipes, which gracefully combine Mediterranean and Levantine influences, and range from small delights (or maza) to daily meals and regal holiday feasts-such as the twelve-course Passover seder.

Arthur Schwartz's Jewish Home Cooking: Yiddish Recipes Revisited
Arthur Schwartz's Jewish Home Cooking
Yiddish Recipes Revisited
Hardcover      ISBN: 1580088988

Arthur Schwartz knows how Jewish food warms the heart and delights the soul, whether it's talking about it, shopping for it, cooking it, or, above all, eating it. JEWISH HOME COOKING presents authentic yet contemporary versions of traditional Ashkenazi foods-rugulach, matzoh brei, challah, brisket, and even challenging classics like kreplach (dumplings) and gefilte fish-that are approachable to make and revelatory to eat. Chapters on appetizers, soups, dairy (meatless) and meat entrees, Passover meals, breads, and desserts are filled with lore about individual dishes and the people who nurtured them in America. Light-filled food and location photographs of delis, butcher shops, and specialty grocery stores paint a vibrant picture of America's touchstone Jewish food culture. Stories, culinary history, and nearly 100 recipes for Jewish home cooking from the heart of American Jewish culture, New York City. Written by one of the country's foremost experts on traditional and contemporary Jewish food, cooking, and culinary culture. Schwartz won the 2005 IACP Cookbook of the Year.Reviews & Awards

James Beard Foundation Cookbook Award Finalist: American Category

IACP International Association of Culinary Professionals Cookbook Awards, American Category Finalist "Jewish Home Cooking helps make sense of the beautiful chaos, with a deep and affectionate examination of New York's Jewish food culture, refracted through the Ins of what he calls the Yiddish-American experience."--New York Times Book Review Summer Reading issue, cookbook roundup"Schwartz breathes life into Yiddish cooking traditions now missing from most cities' main streets as well as many Jewish tables. His colorful stories are so distinctive and charming that even someone who has never heard Schwartz's radio show or seen him on TV will feel his warm personaality and love for food radiating from the page . . . Cooks and readers from Schwartz's generation and earlier, who know firsthand what he's talking about, will appreciate this delightful new book for the world it evokes as much as for the recipes."--Publishers Weekly

Balaboosta
Balaboosta
Hardcover      ISBN: 1579655009

Einat Admony is a 21st-century balaboosta (Yiddish for "perfect housewife").She's a mother and wife, but also a chef busy running three bustling New York City restaurants. Her debut cookbook features 140 of the recipes she cooks for the people she loves--her children, her husband, and the many friends she regularly entertains. Here, Einat's mixed Israeli heritage (Yemenite, Persian) seamlessly blends with the fresh, sophisticated Mediterranean palate she honed while working in some of New York City's most beloved kitchens.

The result is a melting pot of meals for every need and occasion: exotic and exciting dinner-party dishes (harissa-spiced Moroccan fish, beet gnocchi), meals just for kids (chicken schnitzel, root veggie chips), healthy options (butternut squash and saffron soup, quinoa salad with preserved lemon and chickpeas), satisfying comfort food (creamy, cheesy potatoes, spicy chili), and so much more.

Best-Ever Book of Jewish Cooking: Authentic Recipes from a Classic Culinary Heritage: Delicious Dishes Shown in 220 Stunning Photographs
Best-Ever Book of Jewish Cooking: Authentic Recipes from a Classic Culinary Heritage
Delicious Dishes Shown in 220 Stunning Photographs
Hardcover      ISBN: 0857232576

130 classic dishes from Jewish kitchens around the world, with a guide to kosher cooking.

Book of New Israeli Food Hb
Book of New Israeli Food Hb
Hardcover      ISBN: 0805212248

In this stunning new work that is at once a coffee-table book to browse and a complete cookbook, Janna Gur brings us the sumptuous color, variety, and history of today's Israeli cuisine, beautifully illustrated by Eilon Paz, a photographer who is intimate with the local scene.

In Gur's captivating introduction, she describes Israeli food as a product of diverse cultures: the Jews of the Diaspora, settling in a homeland that was new to them, brought their far-flung cuisines to the table even as they looked to their Arab neighbors for additional ingredients and ideas. The delicious, easy-to-follow recipes represent all of these influences, and include some creative interpretations of classics by celebrated Israeli chefs: Beetroot and Pomegranate Salad, Fish Falafel in Spicy Harissa Mayonnaise, Homemade Shawarma, Chreime-North African Hot Fish Stew, Roasted Chicken Drumsticks in Carob Syrup. With favorite recipes for the Sabbath (Sweet Challah Traditional Chopped Liver, Chocolate and Halva Coffeecake) and for holidays (Balkan Potato and Leek Pancakes, Flourless Chocolate and Pistachio Cake), this book offers a unique culinary experience for every occasion. All of this is enriched by Paz's gorgeous and vibrantly colored photographs and by short narratives about significant aspects of Israel's diverse cuisine, such as the generous and unique Israeli breakfast (which grew out of the needs of Kibbutz life), locally produced cheeses that now rival those of Europe, and a dramatic renaissance of wine culture in this ancient land.

"In less than thirty years," Janna Gur writes, "Israeli society has graduated... to a true gastronomic haven." Here she gives us a book that does full, delectable justice to the significance of Israeli food today-Mediterranean at its heart, richly spiced, and imbued with cross-cultural flavors.
The Book of Schmaltz: Love Song to a Forgotten Fat
The Book of Schmaltz
Love Song to a Forgotten Fat
Hardcover      ISBN: 0316254088
The definitive book on schmaltz -- a staple in Jewish cuisine and a "thread in a great tapestry," by one of America's most respected culinary writers.

For culinary expert Michael Ruhlman, the ultimate goal in cooking is flavor, and for certain dishes nothing introduces it half as well as schmaltz. A staple ingredient in traditional Jewish cuisine, schmaltz (or rendered chicken fat), is at risk of disappearing from use due to modern dietary trends and misperceptions about this versatile and flavor-packed ingredient.

The Book of Schmaltz acts as a primer on schmaltz, taking a fresh look at traditional dishes like kugel, kishke, and kreplach, and also venturing into contemporary recipes that take advantage of the versatility of this marvelous fat. Potatoes cooked with schmaltz take on a crispness and satisfying flavor that vegetable oil can't produce. Meats and starches have a depth and complexity that set them apart from the same dishes prepared with olive oil or butter.

What's more, schmaltz provides a unique link to the past that ought to be preserved. "Schmaltz is like a thread that runs through a great tapestry," says Ruhlman's neighbor Lois, whose cooking inspired his own journey into the world of schmaltz. "It's a secret handshake among Jews who love to cook and eat."