Art
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Andy Warhol: 365 Takes: The Andy Warhol Museum Collection
Andy Warhol: 365 Takes
The Andy Warhol Museum Collection
Hardcover      ISBN: 0810943298

Andy Warhol was one of the most compelling figures of the 20th-century art world whose body of work transformed the landscape of contemporary art. He was also a notorious collector who saved practically everything that came his way. In 1994, seven years after the artist's death, The Andy Warhol Museum in Pittsburgh became the repository not only for a substantial body of his artwork and films, but also for the Time Capsules into which he obsessively deposited a lifetime's worth of ephemera and personal memorabilia. For this book--created in the same format as Abrams' best-selling Earth From Above: 365 Days--the museum has gathered highlights of its collection. Illustrated with almost 400 objects, from paintings to party invitations, the volume also features lively commentaries by the museum's staff as well as quotes from Warhol's own irreverent writings. Timed to coincide with the celebration of the museum's 10-year anniversary, this book will serve as both an introduction to and a handbook for the most extensive collection anywhere of this iconic artist's work.

Howard Kottler: Face to Face
Howard Kottler
Face to Face
Hardcover      ISBN: 0295973560

Howard Kottler (1930-1989) was one of the West Coast ceramists who helped to redefine the entire field of contemporary American ceramic art. Patricia Failing's comprehensive and richly illustrated study is the first survey and summation of his work and is based on a series of interviews Kottler initiated after learning of his terminal illness. The artist's remarks - informed and wittily unpretentious - provide a vivid subtext to Failing's own thoughtful and compelling observations linking Kottler's innovative work with other developments in American visual arts.
The book chronicles the evolution of an artist, thoroughly grounded in the traditional crafts and ceramics technology in the 1950s, who then established a rapport between his work and new directions in mainstream painting and sculpture. By the 1980s Kottler had become a conceptual artist who approached his materials as vehicles for art-historical commentary and physical eroticism, and as metaphors for probing the unbridgeable gap between the Self and the Other.
In assessing Kottler's position and influence, Failing discusses his long teaching career and his role as exuberant gadfly to the ceramics establishment, but the focus of her analysis is on the intellectual range and sophistication of his artistic accomplishment. She establishes the major influences on Kottler, including his earliest teachers at Ohio State University and Cranbrook, significant art movements, travel, and his enduring interaction with his students at the University of Washington. Her book affords a masterful review of Kottler's complex development as an artist and, in so doing, provides an index of the profound transitions undergone by the field of American ceramics since the late 1950s.

An American Vision: Three Generations of Wyeth Art : N.D. Wyeth, Andrew Wyeth, James Wyeth
An American Vision
Three Generations of Wyeth Art : N.D. Wyeth, Andrew Wyeth, James Wyeth
Paperback      ISBN: 0821216562

Briefly traces the careers of all three Wyeths, shows a selection of their work, and discusses their approach to painting

Ansel Adams: An Autobiography
Ansel Adams
An Autobiography
Hardcover      ISBN: 0821215965

In this bestselling autobiography, completed shortly before his death in 1984, Ansel Adams looks back at his legendary six-decade career as a conservationist, teacher, musician, and, above all, photographer. Written with characteristic warmth, vigor, and wit, this fascinating account brings to life the infectious enthusiasms, fervent battles, and bountiful friendships of a truly American original.



Dust Jacket : Very Good

The Body: Photographs of the Human Form
The Body
Photographs of the Human Form
Paperback      ISBN: 0811807622

The sensual curve of the shoulder, the disturbing line of a scar, the magnetic pull of a lashed eye -- since the birth of photography, images of the human body have attracted, disturbed, fascinated, and obsessed us. The body has been scrutinized by medical and anatomical photographers; it has been celebrated by photographers of sport and dance; it has inspired a long tradition of photographing the nude; and it has been depicted in phantasmagoric terms. In this rich, involving archive of over 360 duotone and color images culled from worldwide collections, renowned photo curator William A. Ewing has compiled the most comprehensive and arresting visual survey ever published of the human form. From nineteenth-century erotica to the politicized images of the 1990s, The Body offers an exciting, elegantly packaged, provocative record of the camera's infatuation with the human figure.

Georgia O'Keeffe
Georgia O'Keeffe
Hardcover      ISBN: 0810936577

A survey of the art of Georgia O'Keeffe, one of this century's most influential American painters, which traces the genesis and growth of her artistic imagination. This book is organized around the various themes that she explored in her art.

Marsden Hartley
Marsden Hartley
Hardcover      ISBN: 0810934167

One of a series focusing on America's foremost artists from the colonial era to the present, this volume covers the work of Marsden Hartley (1877-1943), known for his canvases of the rocky coasts and mountains of Maine. Hartley's letters reveal his struggle with his sexual orientation.

Monet in the 90s: The Series Paintings
Monet in the 90s
The Series Paintings
Hardcover      ISBN: 0300046596
Growing Pains
Growing Pains
Paperback      ISBN: 0873511735

Wanda G g rose from poverty in small-town Minnesota to international fame in the 1920s as the author of the children's classic, Millions of Cats. Her early diaries, first published in 1940, are the touching, often humorous record of her youth and her struggles to develop her talent.

Antietam: The Soldiers' Battle
Antietam
The Soldiers' Battle
Paperback      ISBN: 0195084667

On September 13, 1862, in a field near Frederick, Maryland, four Union soldiers hit the jack-pot. There they found, wrapped carelessly around three cigars, a copy of General Robert E. Lee's most recent orders detailing Southern objectives and letting Union officers know that Lee had split his Army into four vulnerable groups. General George B. McClellan realized his opportunity to destroy the Army of Northern Virginia one piece at a time. "If I cannot whip Bobbie Lee," exulted McClellan, "I will be willing to go home." But the notoriously prudent Union general allowed precious hours to pass, and, by the time he moved, Lee's army had begun to regroup and prepare for battle near Antietam Creek. The ensuing fight would prove to be not only the bloodiest single day of the entire Civil War, but the bloodiest in the history of the U.S. Army.
Countless historians have analyzed Antietam (known as Sharpsburg in the South) and its aftermath, some concluding that McClellan's failure to vanquish Lee constituted a Southern victory, others that the Confederate retreat into Virginia was a strategic win for the North. But in Antietam: The Soldiers' Battle, historian John Michael Priest tells this brutal tale of slaughter from an entirely new point of view: that of the common enlisted man. Concentrating on the days of actual battle--September 16, 17, and 18, 1862--Priest vividly brings to life the fear, the horror, and the profound courage that soldiers displayed, from the first Federal cavalry probe of the Confederate lines to the last skirmish on the streets of Sharpsburg. Antietam is not a book about generals and their grand strategies, but rather concerns men such as the Pennsylvanian corporal who lied to receive the Medal of Honor; the Virginian who lay unattended on the battlefield through most of the second day of fighting, his arm shattered from a Union artillery shell; the Confederate surgeon who wrote to the sweetheart he left behind enemy lines in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania that he had seen so much death and suffering that his "head had whitened and my very soul turned to stone."
Besides being a gripping tale charged with the immediacy of firsthand accounts of the fighting, Antietam also dispels many misconceptions long held by historians and Civil War buffs alike. Seventy-two detailed maps--which describe the battle in the hourly and quarter-hourly formats established by the Cope Maps of 1904--together with rarely-seen photographs and his own intimate knowledge of the Antietam terrain, allow Priest to offer a substantially new interpretation of what actually happened.
When the last cannon fell silent and the Antietam Creek no longer ran red with Union and Confederate blood, twice as many Americans had been killed in just one day as lost their lives in the War of 1812, the Mexican War, and the Spanish-American war combined. This is a book about battle, but more particularly, about the human dimension in battle. It asks "What was it like?" and while the answers to this simple question by turns horrify and fascinate, they more importantly add a whole new dimension to the study of the American Civil War.