Gender Studies
Featured Items
Great Women Poets/Boxed
Great Women Poets/Boxed
by Dover
Paperback      ISBN: 0486283887

Browning s Sonnets from the Portuguese and Other Poems, Millay s Renascence and Other Poems, Selected Poems by Dickinson, and Goblin Market and Other Poems by Rossetti."

Toward a New Psychology of Women
Toward a New Psychology of Women
2nd Edition    Paperback      ISBN: 0807029092
An update of the feminist classic that "did nothing less than alter the course of gender psychology" (Psychology Today)

In the years since its original publication, this best-selling classic became famous for its groundbreaking demonstration of how sexual stereotypes restrict our psychological development. Toward a New Psychology of Women revolutionized the concepts of strength and weakness, dependency and autonomy, emotion, success, and power, selling more than 200,000 copies and changing the lives of women across the globe.

In this updated second edition, Dr. Jean Baker Miller reflects on where women are today, addressing both the enormous progress in some areas and the challenges still to be met. Celebrating the questions that have been raised and the actions women have taken, as well as looking toward future change, Miller affirms the strength and diversity of womanhood.
West With the Night
West With the Night
Paperback      ISBN: 0865471185

"West with the Night" is the story of Beryl Markham--aviator, racehorse trainer, beauty--and her life in the Kenya of the 1920s and '30s.

Ohitika Woman
Ohitika Woman
Paperback      ISBN: 0060975830

The dramatic, brutally honest, and ultimately triumphant sequel to the bestselling American Book Award winner "Lakota Woman," this book continues Mary Brave Bird' s courageous story of life as a Native American in a white-dominated society.

Beyond God the Father: Toward a Philosophy of Women's Liberation
Beyond God the Father
Toward a Philosophy of Women's Liberation
2nd Edition    Paperback      ISBN: 0807015032

'Certainly one of the most promising theological statements of our time.' --The Christian Century

'Not for the timid, this brilliant book calls for nothing short of the overthrow of patriarchy itself.' --The Village Voice
A Room of One's Own
A Room of One's Own
Paperback      ISBN: 0156787334

"I would venture to guess that Anon, who wrote so many poems without signing them, was often a woman."

In A Room of One's Own, Virginia Woolf imagines that Shakespeare had a sister--a sister equal to Shakespeare in talent, and equal in genius, but whose legacy is radically different. This imaginary woman never writes a word and dies by her own hand, her genius unexpressed. If only she had found the means to create, argues Woolf, she would have reached the same heights as her immortal sibling.

In this classic essay, Woolf takes on the establishment, using her gift of language to dissect the world around her and give voice to those who are without. Her message is a simple one: women must have a steady income and a room of their own in order to have the freedom to create.

With a Foreword by Mary Gordon
Lakota Woman
Lakota Woman
Paperback      ISBN: 0060973897

A unique autobiography unparalleled in American Indian literature, and a deeply moving account of a woman's triumphant struggle to survive in a hostile world.

The Writings of Medieval Women: An Anthology
The Writings of Medieval Women
An Anthology
2nd Edition    Paperback      ISBN: 0815313926

"Royal and saintly women are well-represented here, with the welcome addition of women from the Mediterranean arc...Garland has done a solid job of presenting this book." -- Arthuriana
"The Anthology gives a fine sense of the great range of women's writing in the Middle Ages." -- Medium Aevum

Wild Women: Crusaders, Curmudgeons, and Completely Corsetless Ladies in the Otherwise Virtuous Victorian Era (for Fans of Women of
Wild Women
Crusaders, Curmudgeons, and Completely Corsetless Ladies in the Otherwise Virtuous Victorian Era (for Fans of Women of
Paperback      ISBN: 0943233364
Badass Victorian Women

Enjoy a fascinating and sometimes humorous glimpse into the lives of over one hundred, 19th-century Victorian era American women who refused to whittle themselves down to the Victorian model of proper womanhood. Included in Wild Women are 50-black-and-white photos from the era.

During the Victorian era a woman's pedestal was her prison.

"Women should not be expected to write, or fight, or build, or compose scores. She does all by inspiring man to do all." ─ Ralph Waldo Emerson

"There is nothing more dangerous for a young woman than to rely chiefly upon her intellectual powers, her wit, her imagination, her fancy." ─ Godey's Lady's Book magazine

"...join in checking this mad, wicked folly of 'Women's Rights' with all its attendant horrors on which her poor feeble sex is bent." ─ Queen Victoria of England

But, scores of nineteenth-century American women chose to live life on their terms. In this book you will meet women who refused to remain on a Victorian pedestal.

In San Francisco a courtesan appeared as a plaintiff in court, suing her clients for fraud. In Montana a laundress in her seventies decked a gentleman who refused to pay his bill. A forty-three-year-old schoolteacher plunged down Niagara Falls in a wooden barrel. A frail lighthouse keeper pulled twenty-two sinking sailors out of the ocean off Rhode Island. A pair of Colorado madams fought a public pistol duel over their mutual beau. Two lady lovebirds were legally wed in Michigan. An ad hoc abolitionist spirited away scores of slaves on the Underground Railroad. A Secessionist spy swallowed a secret message as she was arrested, claiming that no one could capture her soul.

Readers of books for women such as Women Who Run with the Wolves or Badass Affirmations will love this book about Victorian women who refused to accept the gender roles of their day.

The Road from Coorain: A Woman's Exquisitely Clear-Sighted Memoir of Growing Up Australian
The Road from Coorain
A Woman's Exquisitely Clear-Sighted Memoir of Growing Up Australian
Paperback      ISBN: 0679724362

In a memoir that pierces and delights us, Jill Ker Conway tells the story of her astonishing journey into adulthood--a journey that would ultimately span immense distances and encompass worlds, ideas, and ways of life that seem a century apart.

She was seven before she ever saw another girl child. At eight, still too small to mount her horse unaided, she was galloping miles, alone, across Coorain, her parents' thirty thousand windswept, drought-haunted acres in the Australian outback, doing a man's job of helping herd the sheep because World War II had taken away the able-bodied men. She loved (and makes us see and feel) the vast unpeopled landscape, beautiful and hostile, whose uncertain weathers tormented the sheep ranchers with conflicting promises of riches and inescapable disaster. She adored (and makes us know) her large-visioned father and her strong, radiant mother, who had gone willingly with him into a pioneering life of loneliness and bone-breaking toil, who seemed miraculously to succeed in creating a warmly sheltering home in the harsh outback, and who, upon her husband's sudden death when Jill was ten, began to slide--bereft of the partnership of work and love that had so utterly fulfilled her--into depression and dependency.

We see Jill, staggered by the loss of her father, catapulted to what seemed another planet--the suburban Sydney of the 1950s and its crowded, noisy, cliquish school life. Then the heady excitement of the University, but with it a yet more demanding course of lessons--Jill embracing new ideas, new possibilities, while at the same time trying to be mother to her mother and resenting it, escaping into drink, pulling herself back, striking a balance. We see her slowly gaining strength, coming into her own emotionally and intellectually and beginning the joyous love affair that gave wings to her newfound self.

Worlds away from Coorain, in America, Jill Conway became a historian and the first woman president of Smith College. Her story of Coorain and the road from Coorain startles by its passion and evocative power, by its understanding of the ways in which a total, deep-rooted commitment to place--or to a dream--can at once liberate and imprison. It is a story of childhood as both Eden and anguish, and of growing up as a journey toward the difficult life of the free.