Gender Studies
Featured Items
West With the Night
West With the Night
Paperback      ISBN: 0865471185

"West with the Night" is the story of Beryl Markham--aviator, racehorse trainer, beauty--and her life in the Kenya of the 1920s and '30s.

Moments of Being: Second Edition
Moments of Being
Second Edition
Paperback      ISBN: 0156619180

"We are the words; we are the music; we are the thing itself."

Published years after her death, Moments of Being is "the single most moving and beautiful thing that Virginia Woolf ever wrote about her own life" (The New York Times) and her only autobiographical writing. This collection of five pieces written for different audiences spanning almost four decades reveals the remarkable unity of Virginia Woolf's art, thought, and sensibility.

"Reminiscences," written during her apprenticeship period, exposes the childhood shared by Woolf and her sister, Vanessa, while "A sketch of the Past" illuminates the relationship with her father, Leslie Stephens, who played a crucial role in her development as an individual a writer. Of the final three pieces, composed for the Memoir Club, which required absolute candor of its members, two show Woolf at the threshold of artistic maturity and one shows a confident writer poking fun at her own foibles.
Foucault and Feminism: Power, Gender and the Self
Foucault and Feminism
Power, Gender and the Self
Paperback      ISBN: 1555531539
White Women, Race Matters: The Social Construction of Whiteness
White Women, Race Matters
The Social Construction of Whiteness
Paperback      ISBN: 0816622582
Women, Race, & Class
Women, Race, & Class
Paperback      ISBN: 0394713516

A powerful study of the women's liberation movement in the U.S., from abolitionist days to the present, that demonstrates how it has always been hampered by the racist and classist biases of its leaders. From the widely revered and legendary political activist and scholar Angela Davis.

The Writings of Medieval Women: An Anthology
The Writings of Medieval Women
An Anthology
2nd Edition    Paperback      ISBN: 0815313926

"Royal and saintly women are well-represented here, with the welcome addition of women from the Mediterranean arc...Garland has done a solid job of presenting this book." -- Arthuriana
"The Anthology gives a fine sense of the great range of women's writing in the Middle Ages." -- Medium Aevum

Parti-Colored Blocks for a Quilt
Parti-Colored Blocks for a Quilt
Paperback      ISBN: 0472063383

Essays by the distinguished American author, Marge Piercy, examine feminist culture, the nature of literature, and the writing of her poetry and novels

Ohitika Woman
Ohitika Woman
Paperback      ISBN: 0060975830

The dramatic, brutally honest, and ultimately triumphant sequel to the bestselling American Book Award winner "Lakota Woman," this book continues Mary Brave Bird' s courageous story of life as a Native American in a white-dominated society.

Who Can Speak?: Authority and Critical Identity
Who Can Speak?
Authority and Critical Identity
Paperback      ISBN: 0252064879

For women, for lesbians and gays, for African Americans, for Asians, Native Americans, or any other self-identified and -identifying group, who can speak? Who has the authority to speak for these groups? Is there genuinely such a thing as "objectivity," or can only members of these groups speak, finally, for themselves? And who has the authority to decide who has the authority?
This collection examines how theory and criticism are complicated by
multiple perspectives in an increasingly multicultural society and
faces head on the difficult question of what qualifies a critic to speak from or about a particular position. In different formats and from different perspectives from various disciplines, the contributors to this volume analytically and innovatively work together to define the problems and capture the contradictions and tensions inherent in the issues of authority, epistemology, and discourse.

A Room of One's Own
A Room of One's Own
Paperback      ISBN: 0156787334

"I would venture to guess that Anon, who wrote so many poems without signing them, was often a woman."

In A Room of One's Own, Virginia Woolf imagines that Shakespeare had a sister--a sister equal to Shakespeare in talent, and equal in genius, but whose legacy is radically different. This imaginary woman never writes a word and dies by her own hand, her genius unexpressed. If only she had found the means to create, argues Woolf, she would have reached the same heights as her immortal sibling.

In this classic essay, Woolf takes on the establishment, using her gift of language to dissect the world around her and give voice to those who are without. Her message is a simple one: women must have a steady income and a room of their own in order to have the freedom to create.

With a Foreword by Mary Gordon