Native American Studies
Featured Items
Lakota Woman
Lakota Woman
Paperback      ISBN: 0060973897

A unique autobiography unparalleled in American Indian literature, and a deeply moving account of a woman's triumphant struggle to survive in a hostile world.

When Beaver Was Very Great: Stories to Live by
When Beaver Was Very Great
Stories to Live by
Paperback      ISBN: 1883953073

It happened in the long ago. . . . So begin many folk tales in this wonderful collection of traditional legends and recent writings by Ojibwe elder storyteller Anne Dunn. The short pieces range from folk tales of Native American origin myths (the antics of Beaver, Rabbit, Otter, Bear, and others) to nature writing and contemporary stories of peace, justice, and environmental concern. Brimming with insight, vibrant with strength and beauty, these indeed are stories to live by, for all ages. Divided into the four seasons of the year, and set in the mostly in the Minnesota northwoods near Lake Superior, many of the stories are perfect to be read aloud to children. Anne M. Dunn is an Ojibwe storyteller from the Leech Lake area of Minnesota.

Daughters of the Earth
Daughters of the Earth
Paperback      ISBN: 068482955x

She was both guardian of the hearth and, on occasion, ruler and warrior, leading men into battle, managing the affairs of her people, sporting war paint as well as necklaces and earrings.

She built houses and ground corn, wove blankets and painted pottery, played field hockey and rode racehorses.

Frequently she enjoyed an open and joyous sexuality before marriage; if her marriage didn't work out she could divorce her husband by the mere act of returning to her parents. She mourned her dead by tearing her clothes and covering herself with ashes, and when she herself died was often shrouded in her wedding dress.

She was our native sister, the American Indian woman, and it is of her life and lore that Carolyn Niethammer writes in this rich tapestry of America's past and present.

Here, as it unfolded, is the chronology of the native American woman's life. Here are the birth rites of Caddo women from the Mississippi-Arkansas border, who bore their children alone by the banks of rivers and then immersed themselves and their babies in river water; here are Apache puberty ceremonies that are still carried on today, when the cost for the celebrations can run anywhere from one to six thousand dollars. Here are songs from the Night Dances of the Sioux, where girls clustered on one side of the lodge and boys congregated on the other; here is the Shawnee legend of the Corn Person and of Our Grandmother, the two female deities who ruled the earth. Far from the submissive, downtrodden "squaw" of popular myth, the native American woman emerges as a proud, sometimes stoic, always human individual from whom those who came after can learn much.

At a time when many contemporary American women are seeking alternatives to a life-style and role they have outgrown, Daughters of the Earth offers us an absorbing--and illuminating--legacy of dignity and purpose.
Spirit & Reason: The Vine Deloria, Jr., Reader
Spirit & Reason
The Vine Deloria, Jr., Reader
Paperback      ISBN: 1555914306

A collection of Vine Deloria Jr.'s writings from books, essays, and articles, as well as previously unpublished pieces.

Saga of Hugh Glass
Saga of Hugh Glass
Paperback      ISBN: 0803258348

Before his most fabulous adventure (celebrated by John G. Neihardt in The Song of Hugh Glass and by Frederick Manfred in Lord Grizzly), Hugh Glass was captured by the buccaneer Jean Lafitte and turned pirate himself until his first chance to escape. Soon he fell prisoner to the Pawnees and lived for four years as one of them before he managed to make his way to St. Louis. Next he joined a group of trappers to open up the fur-rich, Indian-held territory of the Upper Missouri River. Then unfolds the legend of a man who survived under impossible conditions: robbed and left to die by his comrades, he struggled alone, unarmed, and almost mortally wounded through two thousand miles of wilderness.

Blackfeet and Buffalo: Memories of Life Among the Indians
Blackfeet and Buffalo
Memories of Life Among the Indians
Paperback      ISBN: 0806117001

A fur trader from 1878 to 1904, Schultz married a Pikuni (Blackfoot) woman, became a member of the tribe, and was given the Blackfoot name Apikuni. With the disappearance of the buffalo it was as difficult for Schultz to adjust to the new way of life as it was for the other Blackfeet. He took to the mountains and explored the eastern slope of the Rockies, hunting game and guiding other hunters and explorers, including George Bird Grinnell, the Baring brothers, and Ralph Pulitzer. He named mountains, glaciers, and lakes; he was the first to identify the mountain goat; and through his and Grinnell's efforts the northern portion of the American Rockies was set apart as Glacier National Park.

Living Our Language: Ojibwe Tales and Oral Histories
Living Our Language
Ojibwe Tales and Oral Histories
Paperback      ISBN: 0873514041

A language carries a people's memories, whether they are recounted as individual reminiscences, as communal history, or as humorous tales. This collection of stories from Anishinaabe elders offers a history of a people at the same time that it seeks to preserve the language of that people.>

As fluent speakers of Ojibwe grow older, the community questions whether younger speakers know the language well enough to pass it on to the next generation. Young and old alike are making widespread efforts to preserve the Ojibwe language, and, as part of this campaign, Anton Treuer has collected stories from Anishinaabe elders living at Leech Lake, White Earth, Mille Lacs, Red Lake, and St. Croix reservations.

Based on interviews Treuer conducted with ten elders--Archie Mosay, Jim Clark, Melvin Eagle, Joe Auginaush, Collins Oakgrove, Emma Fisher, Scott Headbird, Susan Jackson, Hartley White, and Porky White--this anthology presents the elders' stories transcribed in Ojibwe with English translation on facing pages. These stories contain a wealth of information, including oral histories of the Anishinaabe people and personal reminiscences, educational tales, and humorous anecdotes. Treuer's translations of these stories preserve the speakers' personalities, allowing their voices to emerge from the page.

This dual-language text will prove instructive for those interested in Ojibwe language and culture, while the stories themselves offer the gift of a living language and the history of a people.

On the Rez
On the Rez
Paperback      ISBN: 0312278594

On the Rez is a sharp, unflinching account of the modern-day American Indian experience, especially that of the Oglala Sioux, who now live on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in the plains and badlands of the American West. Crazy Horse, perhaps the greatest Indian war leader of the 1800s, and Black Elk, the holy man whose teachings achieved worldwide renown, were Oglala; in these typically perceptive pages, Frazier seeks out their descendants on Pine Ridge--a/k/a the rez--which is one of the poorest places in America today.

Along with his longtime friend Le War Lance (whom he first wrote about in his 1989 bestseller, Great Plains) and other Oglala companions, Frazier fully explores the rez as they visit friends and relatives, go to pow-wows and rodeos and package stores, and tinker with a variety of falling-apart cars. He takes us inside the world of the Sioux as few writers ever have, writing with much wit, compassion, and imagination. In the career of SuAnne Big Crow, for example, the most admired Oglala basketball player of all time, who died in a car accident in 1992, Frazier finds a contemporary reemergence of the death-defying, public-spirited Sioux hero who fights with grace and glory to save her followers.

On the Rez vividly portrays the survival, through toughness and humor, of a great people whose culture has helped to shape the American identity.
Oglala Women: Myth, Ritual, and Reality
Oglala Women
Myth, Ritual, and Reality
Paperback      ISBN: 0226677494

Based on interviews and life histories collected over more than twenty-five years of study on the Pine Ridge reservation in South Dakota, Marla N. Powers conveys what it means to be an Oglala woman. Despite the myth of the Euramerican that sees Oglala women as inferior to men, and the Lakota myth that seems them as superior, in reality, Powers argues, the roles of male and female emerge as complementary. In fact, she claims, Oglala women have been better able to adapt to the dominant white culture and provide much of the stability and continuity of modern tribal life. This rich ethnographic portrait considers the complete context of Oglala life--religion, economics, medicine, politics, old age--and is enhanced by numerous modern and historical photographs.

It is a happy event when a fine scholarly work is rendered accessible to the general reader, especially so when none of the complexity of the subject matter is sacrificed. Oglala Women is a long overdue revisionary ethnography of Native American culture.--Penny Skillman, San Francisco Chronicle Review

Marla N. Powers's fine study introduced me to Oglala women 'portrayed from the perspectives of Indians, ' to women who did not pity themselves and want no pity from others. . . . A brave, thorough, and stimulating book.--Melody Graulich, Women's Review of Books

Powers's new book is an intricate weaving . . . and her synthesis brings all of these pieces into a well-integrated and insightful whole, one which sheds new light on the importance of women and how they have adapted to the circumstances of the last century.--Elizabeth S. Grobsmith, Nebraska History
The Killing of Chief Crazy Horse: Three Eyewitness Views by the Indian, Chief He Dog the Indian White, William Garnett the White Doctor, Valentine McGillycuddy
The Killing of Chief Crazy Horse
Three Eyewitness Views by the Indian, Chief He Dog the Indian White, William Garnett the White Doctor, Valentine McGillycuddy
Paperback      ISBN: 0803263309
The Killing of Chief Crazy Horse is a story of envy, greed, and treachery. In the year after the Battle of the Little Big Horn, Crazy Horse and his half-starved followers finally surrendered to the U.S. Army near Camp Robinson, Nebraska. The reverberations of that event led to the death of the great Oglala Sioux chief in the fall of 1877. Chiefs who had already surrendered resented the favors he received in doing so. When the army asked for his help in rounding up the Nez Perces, Crazy Horse's reply allegedly was mistranslated by Frank Grouard, a scout for General George Crook. By August rumors had spread that he was planning another outbreak. Arrested at Fort Robinson on 5 September, Crazy Horse was fatally wounded by a bayonet in a scuffle that was reported differently by every observer.

In this book the killing of Crazy Horse is viewed from three widely different perspectives--that of Chief He Dog, the victim's friend and lifelong companion; that of William Garnett, who was guide and interpreter for Lieutenant William P. Clark, on special assignment to General Crook; and that of Dr. Valentine McGillycuddy, the medical officer who attended Crazy Horse in his last hours. Their eyewitness accounts, edited and introduced by Robert A. Clark, combine to give The Killing of Chief Crazy Horse all the starkness and horror of classical tragedy.