Eastern Europe
Featured Items
The Crime and the Silence: Confronting the Massacre of Jews in Wartime Jedwabne
The Crime and the Silence
Confronting the Massacre of Jews in Wartime Jedwabne
Paperback      ISBN: 0374536376

Winner of the National Jewish Book Award in the Holocaust category

A monumental work of nonfiction on a wartime atrocity, its sixty-year denial, and the impact of its truth

Jan Gross's hugely controversial Neighbors was a historian's disclosure of the events in the small Polish town of Jedwabne on July 10, 1941, when the citizens rounded up the Jewish population and burned them alive in a barn. The massacre was a shocking secret that had been suppressed for more than sixty years, and it provoked the most important public debate in Poland since 1989. From the outset, Anna Bikont reported on the town, combing through archives and interviewing residents who survived the war period. Her writing became a crucial part of the debate and she herself an actor in a national drama.
Part history, part memoir, The Crime and the Silence is the journalist's account of these events: both the story of the massacre told through oral histories of survivors and witnesses, and a portrait of a Polish town coming to terms with its dark past. Including the perspectives of both heroes and perpetrators, Bikont chronicles the sources of the hatred that exploded against Jews and asks what myths grow on hidden memories, what destruction they cause, and what happens to a society that refuses to accept a horrific truth.
A profoundly moving exploration of being Jewish in modern Poland that Julian Barnes called "one of the most chilling books," The Crime and the Silence is a vital contribution to Holocaust history and a fascinating story of a town coming to terms with its dark past.

Exile and Social Thought: Hungarian Intellectuals in Germany and Austria, 1919-1933
Exile and Social Thought
Hungarian Intellectuals in Germany and Austria, 1919-1933
Hardcover      ISBN: 0691031592

Embroiled in the political events surrounding World War I and the failed Hungarian revolutions of 1918-19, a number of intellectuals fled Hungary for Germany and Austria, where they essentially created Weimar culture. Among them were Georg Luk cs, whose History and Class Consciousness recast Marxism and challenged even those who repudiated its politics; Bela Bal zs, who pioneered film theory and collaborated with film-makers G. W. Pabst, Leni Riefenstahl, and Alexander Korda; L szl Moholy-Nagy, who codirected the Bauhaus during its heyday in the mid-1920s; and Karl Mannheim, whose Ideology and Utopia was the most widely discussed work of noncommunist social theory during the Weimar years. In this collective portrait combining intellectual history with biographical detail, Lee Congdon describes how Hungarian thinkers, each in a different way, passionately advocated the need for community in a Europe torn by war and revolution. Whether communist, avant-gardist, or Catholic convert, each thinker is examined within the vast tapestry of his works, his cultural and intellectual milieu, and his experience as an exile. Despite the ideological differences of these men, Congdon reveals how their personal destinies and social goals often merged. Since many were assimilated Jews, he argues that their thinking on society was inextricably intertwined with their youthful sensitivity to anti-Semitism in Hungary and with the isolating limitations of their lives in Germany and Austria.

Originally published in 1991.

The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback and hardcover editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.

Ukraine's Forbidden History
Ukraine's Forbidden History
Paperback      ISBN: 1899235566

Since 1991, the Ukraine was the largest nation in the world without independence. A fertile country, rich in natural resources, it has long been fought over by neighbouring Poles, Germans, Russians and Rumanians and previous attempts for independence have been brutally crushed, in 1918 and 1941.

Dirty Jewess: A Woman's Courageous Journey to Religious and Political Freedom
Dirty Jewess
A Woman's Courageous Journey to Religious and Political Freedom
Hardcover      ISBN: 9655242773
Dirty Jewess is the personal account of one woman's courageous journey towards religious and political freedom while coming of age in post-Holocaust, communist Czechoslovakia. The narrative recalls the author's experience as a child of Holocaust survivors, living as a refugee in Rome, and finally realizing her dream of becoming a successful American citizen. Silvia Fishbaum's life behind the iron curtain is a universal tale of humanity, resilience, and overcoming adversity. Fishbaum weaves together her mother's testimony of Auschwitz with the testimony of her childhood art tutor, Ludovit Feld--a victim of Mengele's experiments--to create a compelling and layered life narrative.
The Zookeeper's Wife: A War Story
The Zookeeper's Wife
A War Story
Paperback      ISBN: 039333306x

After their zoo was bombed, Polish zookeepers Jan and Antonina Zabinski managed to save over three hundred people from the Nazis by hiding refugees in the empty animal cages. With animal names for these "guests," and human names for the animals, it's no wonder that the zoo's code name became "The House Under a Crazy Star." Best-selling naturalist and acclaimed storyteller Diane Ackerman combines extensive research and an exuberant writing style to re-create this fascinating, true-life story--sharing Antonina's life as "the zookeeper's wife," while examining the disturbing obsessions at the core of Nazism. Winner of the 2008 Orion Award.

On Behalf of Their Homeland: Fifty Years of Svu: an Eyewitness Account of the History of the Czechoslovak Society of Arts and Sciences Svu
On Behalf of Their Homeland
Fifty Years of Svu: an Eyewitness Account of the History of the Czechoslovak Society of Arts and Sciences Svu
Hardcover      ISBN: 0880336307

The Czechoslovak Society of Arts and Sciences (SVU) is a unique cultural organization established to rehabilitate Czechoslovakia's image abroad, which, in 1958, had become tarnished by communism. Founded by Czechoslovak intellectuals, SVU promotes scientific and cultural activities and has set up chapters in major cities around the world. This volume, written by one of the Society's founders, details the fascinating history of the SVU over the past fifty years.

The Bugarstica: A Bilingual Anthology of the Earliest Extant South Slavic Folk Narrative Song
The Bugarstica
A Bilingual Anthology of the Earliest Extant South Slavic Folk Narrative Song
Hardcover      ISBN: 0252017110
Bury Me Standing: The Gypsies and Their Journey
Bury Me Standing
The Gypsies and Their Journey
Paperback      ISBN: 067973743x

A masterful work of personal reportage, this volume is also a vibrant portrait of a mysterious people and an essential document of a disappearing culture.

Fabled, feared, romanticized, and reviled, the Gypsies--or Roma--are among the least understood people on earth. Their culture remains largely obscure, but in Isabel Fonseca they have found an eloquent witness.

In Bury Me Standing, alongside unforgettable portraits of individuals--the poet, the politician, the child prostitute--Fonseca offers sharp insights into the humor, language, wisdom, and taboos of the Roma. She traces their exodus out of India 1,000 years ago and their astonishing history of persecution: enslaved by the princes of medieval Romania; massacred by the Nazis; forcibly assimilated by the communist regimes; evicted from their settlements in Eastern Europe, and most recently, in Western Europe as well. Whether as handy scapegoats or figments of the romantic imagination, the Gypsies have always been with us--but never before have they been brought so vividly to life.

Includes fifty black and white photos.
A Lucky Child: A Memoir of Surviving Auschwitz as a Young Boy
A Lucky Child
A Memoir of Surviving Auschwitz as a Young Boy
Paperback      ISBN: 0316339180

Thomas Buergenthal, now a Judge in the International Court of Justice in The Hague, tells his astonishing experiences as a young boy in his memoir A Lucky Child. He arrived at Auschwitz at age 10 after surviving two ghettos and a labor camp. Separated first from his mother and then his father, Buergenthal managed by his wits and some remarkable strokes of luck to survive on his own. Almost two years after his liberation, Buergenthal was miraculously reunited with his mother and in 1951 arrived in the U.S. to start a new life.

Now dedicated to helping those subjected to tyranny throughout the world, Buergenthal writes his story with a simple clarity that highlights the stark details of unimaginable hardship. A Lucky Child is a book that demands to be read by all.
The House of the Dead: Siberian Exile Under the Tsars
The House of the Dead
Siberian Exile Under the Tsars
Paperback      ISBN: 0307949265
Winner of the Cundill History Prize

The House of the Dead tells the incredible hundred-year-long story of "the vast prison without a roof" that was Russia's Siberian penal colony. From the beginning of the nineteenth century until the Russian Revolution, the tsars exiled more than a million prisoners and their families east. Here Daniel Beer illuminates both the brutal realities of this inhuman system and the tragic and inspiring fates of those who endured it. Siberia was intended to serve not only as a dumping ground for criminals and political dissidents, but also as new settlements. The system failed on both fronts: it peopled Siberia with an army of destitute and desperate vagabonds who visited a plague of crime on the indigenous population, and transformed the region into a virtual laboratory of revolution. A masterly and original work of nonfiction, The House of the Dead is the history of a failed social experiment and an examination of Siberia's decisive influence on the political forces of the modern world.