Literary Criticism
Featured Items
The History of Tom Jones
The History of Tom Jones
Paperback      ISBN: 0140430091
The romantic adventures of a reckless yet personable young man are chronicled in what is considered to be the forerunner of the modern novel.
From Puritanism to Postmodernism: A History of American Literature
From Puritanism to Postmodernism
A History of American Literature
Paperback      ISBN: 0140144358
A survey of American literature analyzes its social and historical contexts, assessing American literature in terms of both its European roots and its uniquely American institutions and attitudes
S/Z
S/Z
Paperback      ISBN: 0374521670
Preface by Richard Howard. Translated by Richard Miller. This is Barthes's scrupulous literary analysis of Balzac's short story "Sarrasine."
Much Ado About Nothing
Much Ado About Nothing
Paperback      ISBN: 0521426103
The text of Shakepeare's comedy is accompanied by background information on the plot, language, costumes, and themes of the play
Poems for the Millennium: The University of California Book of Modern and Postmodern Poetry : From Fin-De-Siecle to Negritude
Poems for the Millennium
The University of California Book of Modern and Postmodern Poetry : From Fin-De-Siecle to Negritude
Paperback      ISBN: 0520072278
Documents the revolutionary changes taking place throughout the vista of modern poetry with selections by such figures as Stein, Rilke, and Pound and sections that demonstrate various twentieth-century movements. Simultaneous. UP.
Earthway: A Native American Visionary's Path to Total Mind, Body and Spirit Health
Earthway
A Native American Visionary's Path to Total Mind, Body and Spirit Health
Paperback      ISBN: 0671706675
A mindbodyspirit guide to achieving wholeness covers diet, lifestyle, natural medicine, dream interpretation, and much more. Reissue.
The Sphinx in the City: Urban Life, the Control of Disorder, and Women
The Sphinx in the City
Urban Life, the Control of Disorder, and Women
Paperback      ISBN: 0520078640
Elizabeth Wilson's elegant, provocative, and scholarly study uses fiction, essays, film, and art, as well as history and sociology, to look at some of the world's greatest cities—London, Paris, Moscow, New York, Chicago, Lusaka, and São Paulo—and presents a powerful critique of utopian planning, anti-urbanism, postmodernism, and traditional architecture. For women the city offers freedom, including sexual freedom, but also new dangers. Planners and reformers have repeatedly attempted to regulate women—and the working class and ethnic minorities—by means of grandiose, utopian plans, nearly destroying the richness of urban culture. City centers have become uninhabited business districts, the countryside suburbanized. There is danger without pleasure, consumerism without choice, safety without stimulation. What is needed is a new understanding of city life and Wilson gives us an intriguing introduction to what this might be.
Act of Reading: A Theory of Aesthetic Response
Act of Reading
A Theory of Aesthetic Response
Paperback      ISBN: 0801823714
Warriors: Navajo Code Talkers
Warriors
Navajo Code Talkers
Paperback      ISBN: 0873585135
Black-and-white photographic portraits of 75 survivors from the Navajo radio operators whose native tongue proved an unbreakable code to the Japanese during World War II. The introduction includes a few photographs from the period. Annotation copyright Book News, Inc. Portland, Or.
French Lessons: A Memoir
French Lessons
A Memoir
Hardcover      ISBN: 0226424189
Brilliantly uniting the personal and the critical, French Lessons is a powerful autobiographical experiment. It tells the story of an American woman escaping into the French language and of a scholar and teacher coming to grips with her history of learning. Kaplan begins with a distinctly American quest for an imaginary France of the intelligence. But soon her infatuation with all things French comes up against the dark, unimagined recesses of French political and cultural life. The daughter of a Jewish lawyer who prosecuted Nazi war criminals at Nuremburg, Kaplan grew up in the 1960s in the Midwest. After her father's death when she was seven, French became her way of "leaving home" and finding herself in another language and culture. In spare, midwestern prose, by turns intimate and wry, Kaplan describes how, as a student in a Swiss boarding school and later in a junior year abroad in Bordeaux, she passionately sought the French "r," attentively honed her accent, and learned the idioms of her French lover. When, as a graduate student, her passion for French culture turned to the elegance and sophistication of its intellectual life, she found herself drawn to the language and style of the novelist Louis-Ferdinand Celine. At the same time she was repulsed by his anti-Semitism. At Yale in the late 70s, during the heyday of deconstruction she chose to transgress its apolitical purity and work on a subject "that made history impossible to ignore:" French fascist intellectuals. Kaplan's discussion of the "de Man affair" — the discovery that her brilliant and charismatic Yale professor had written compromising articles for the pro-Nazi Belgian press—and her personal account of the paradoxes of deconstruction are among the most compelling available on this subject. French Lessons belongs in the company of Sartre's Words and the memoirs of Nathalie Sarraute, Annie Ernaux, and Eva Hoffman. No book so engrossingly conveys both the excitement of learning and the moral dilemmas of the intellectual life.