Literary Criticism
Featured Items
A Room of One's Own
A Room of One's Own
Hardcover      ISBN: 0151787336
Describes the domestic obligations, social limitations, and economic factors which impede literary creativity in women
The Art of Fiction: Illustrated from Classic and Modern Texts
The Art of Fiction
Illustrated from Classic and Modern Texts
Paperback      ISBN: 0140174923
A collection of articles which appeared in "The Independent on Sunday" for 50 weeks between 1991 and 1992. The art of fiction is considered under a wide range of headings, such as the intrusive author, suspense, the epistolary novel, time-shift, magic realism and symbolism.
The Way of the Storyteller
The Way of the Storyteller
Paperback      ISBN: 0140044361
An expert's advice on the art of storytelling with 11 charming folk tales
Warriors: Navajo Code Talkers
Warriors
Navajo Code Talkers
Paperback      ISBN: 0873585135
Black-and-white photographic portraits of 75 survivors from the Navajo radio operators whose native tongue proved an unbreakable code to the Japanese during World War II. The introduction includes a few photographs from the period. Annotation copyright Book News, Inc. Portland, Or.
Complete Poems and Plays: 1909-1950
Complete Poems and Plays
1909-1950
Hardcover      ISBN: 015121185x
A collection of poems and plays by this prominent British writer who was awarded the Nobel Prize in 1948
Mythologies
Mythologies
Paperback      ISBN: 0374521506
"[Mythologies] illustrates the beautiful generosity of Barthes's progressive interest in the meaning (his word is signification) of practically everything around him, not only the books and paintings of high art, but also the slogans, trivia, toys, food, and popular rituals (cruises, striptease, eating, wrestling matches) of contemporary life . . . For Barthes, words and objects have in common the organized capacity to say something; at the same time, since they are signs, words and objects have the bad faith always to appear natural to their consumer, as if what they say is eternal, true, necessary, instead of arbitrary, made, contingent. Mythologies finds Barthes revealing the fashioned systems of ideas that make it possible, for example, for 'Einstein's brain' to stand for, be the myth of, 'a genius so lacking in magic that one speaks about his thought as a functional labor analogous to the mechanical making of sausages.' Each of the little essays in this book wrenches a definition out of a common but constructed object, making the object speak its hidden, but ever-so-present, reservoir of manufactured sense."--Edward W. Said
The History of Tom Jones
The History of Tom Jones
Paperback      ISBN: 0140430091
The romantic adventures of a reckless yet personable young man are chronicled in what is considered to be the forerunner of the modern novel.
Supernatural Horror in Literature
Supernatural Horror in Literature
Paperback      ISBN: 0486201058
The twentieth-century American writer discusses his literary techniques and philosophies along with the history and aesthetics of horror fiction
The Oxford Companion to American Literature
The Oxford Companion to American Literature
Hardcover      ISBN: 0195065484
A completely revised edition of a standard reference work covers the movements, authors, genres, critics, awards, and many other aspects of American literature, and includes nearly two hundred new entries, many covering female and ethnic writers. UP.
Wartime: Understanding and Behavior in the Second World War
Wartime
Understanding and Behavior in the Second World War
Paperback      ISBN: 0195065778
Winner of both the National Book Award for Arts and Letters and the National Book Critics Circle Award for Criticism, Paul Fussell's classic The Great War and Modern Memory remains one of the most original and gripping volumes ever written about the First World War. In its panoramic scope and poetic intensity, it illuminated a war that changed a generation and revolutionized the way we see the world. Now, in Wartime, Paul Fussell turns to the Second World War, the conflict in which he himself fought, to weave a more intensely personal and wide-ranging narrative. Whereas his former book focused primarily on literary figures, here Fussell examines the immediate impact of the war on soldiers and civilians. He compellingly depicts the psychological and emotional atmosphere of World War II by analyzing the wishful thinking and the euphemisms people needed to deal with unacceptable reality; by describing the abnormally intense frustration of desire and some of the means by which desire was satisfied; and, most importantly, by emphasizing the damage the war did to intellect, discrimination, honesty, individuality, complexity, ambiguity, and wit. Of course, no book of Fussell's would be complete without serious attention to the literature of the time. He offers astute commentary on Edmund Wilson's argument with Archibald MacLeish, Cyril Connolly's Horizon magazine, the war poetry of Randall Jarrell and Louis Simpson, and many other aspects of the wartime literary world. In this stunning volume, Fussell conveys the essence of that war as no other writer before him has.