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History of Jews
After the War Was Over: Jewish Life in Amsterdam in the 1950s
After the War Was Over
Jewish Life in Amsterdam in the 1950s
Hardcover      ISBN: 9053308571

At the start of his lifelong career, Magnum photographer Leonard Freed (1929-2006) lived in Amsterdam for many years, from 1957 to 1970. As an American Jew from a family of Russian immigrants, he felt at ease in this historic city with its liberal spirit and longstanding tradition of tolerance for Jews. Freed was fascinated by the remarkable postwar recovery of Jewish life in Amsterdam, where only 20,000 out of 80,000 Jews had survived the Shoah. This became the topic of his first major documentary project as a professional photographer. He made a multifaceted and compelling portrait of the city's Jewish community, which had endured unimaginable suffering but was now striving to forget, and building a new life with exceptional resilience and vitality. His photographs capture the atmosphere of optimism that prevailed in the Jewish community at the time, and testify to the courage and willpower of those who had survived the war. Today we know that the traumas of war cannot be suppressed, but in those days, that seemed like the only way of coping. The buried pain and grief lingered on, resurfacing only many years later. Over time, Freed's photographs have therefore acquired additional layers of meaning. They now form a unique and valuable historical document. In 1958, a small selection from Freed's documentary series was published in his first photo book, Joden van Amsterdam (Jews of Amsterdam), by publishing house De Bezige Bij. In 2013, the Jewish Historical Museum in Amsterdam rediscovered the series in Freed's archives. The museum acquired 80 vintage prints and 150 new prints of previously unpublished images from Brigitte Freed, the photographer's widow. This book presents some 150 photos, with an introduction by curator of photography Bernadette van Woerkom. Leonard Freed born in Brooklyn, New York, first took up photography in 1953 while traveling in Europe. His work focuses on ordinary people going about their everyday lives, expressing a special bond with outsiders and the oppressed. Freed made many probing documentary photo series about social issues, including one on black Americans and their struggle for civil rights. In 1972, he was admitted to the famous photographic cooperative Magnum Photos. Throughout his career, he showed an ongoing interest in Jewish life around the world.Leonard Freed born in Brooklyn, New York, first took up photography in 1953 while traveling in Europe. His work focuses on ordinary people going about their everyday lives, expressing a special bond with outsiders and the oppressed. Freed made many probing documentary photo series about social issues, including one on black Americans and their struggle for civil rights. In 1972, he was admitted to the famous photographic cooperative Magnum Photos. Throughout his career, he showed an ongoing interest in Jewish life around the world.

After Tragedy and Triumph
After Tragedy and Triumph
Hardcover      ISBN: 052138057x

The story of American Jewry is inextricably entwined with the awesome defeat of the Holocaust and the rebirth of the state of Israel. However, for Michael Berenbaum, and others of his generation, whose adult consciousness included the war in Lebanon and the Palestinian Uprisings, the tale is more anguished, for the Jewish People are now divided, uncertain about the implications of the past and the direction of their future. Berenbaum explores the Jewish identity of this generation, the first to mature after tragedy and triumph. He probes the Holocaust's impact on Jewish consciousness and the imprint of American culture on Jewish identity. Challenging Zionism's conventional assumptions, he details American Jews' changing relationship to Israel as he examines the tensions created within Jewish tradition between a history of victimization and the empowerment of Jews. While demonstrating that the security of victory is one step from the anguish of victims, even when the victors have recently emerged from the fire, Berenbaum holds out the hope of liberation for Judaism, maintaining that five thousand years of history, with its chapter of Holocaust and empowerment, provide a unique foundation upon which to build a future. Michael Berenbaum is Hymen Goldman Professor of Theology at Georgetown University and Project Director of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, DC. He is the author or editor of several books, including The Vision of the Void: Theological Reflections on the Works of Elie Wiesel and The Holocaust: Religious and Political Implications (with John Roth).

After Tragedy and Triumph: Essays in Modern Jewish Thought and the American Experience
After Tragedy and Triumph
Essays in Modern Jewish Thought and the American Experience
1st Edition    Paperback      ISBN: 0521099927

The story of American Jewry is inextricably entwined with the awesome defeat of the Holocaust and the rebirth of the state of Israel. However, for Michael Berenbaum, and others of his generation, whose adult consciousness included the war in Lebanon and the Palestinian Uprisings, the tale is more anguished, for the Jewish People are now divided, uncertain about the implications of the past and the direction of their future. Berenbaum explores the Jewish identity of this generation, the first to mature after tragedy and triumph. He probes the Holocaust's impact on Jewish consciousness and the imprint of American culture on Jewish identity. Challenging Zionism's conventional assumptions, he details American Jews' changing relationship to Israel as he examines the tensions created within Jewish tradition between a history of victimization and the empowerment of Jews. While demonstrating that the security of victory is one step from the anguish of victims, even when the victors have recently emerged from the fire, Berenbaum holds out the hope of liberation for Judaism, maintaining that five thousand years of history, with its chapter of Holocaust and empowerment, provide a unique foundation upon which to build a future. Michael Berenbaum is Hymen Goldman Professor of Theology at Georgetown University and Project Director of the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, DC. He is the author or editor of several books, including The Vision of the Void: Theological Reflections on the Works of Elie Wiesel and The Holocaust: Religious and Political Implications (with John Roth).

The Alien Jew in the British Imagination, 1881-1905: Space, Mobility and Territoriality
The Alien Jew in the British Imagination, 1881-1905
Space, Mobility and Territoriality
Hardcover      ISBN: 3030259757

This book explores how fin de si cle Britain and Britons displaced spatially-charged apprehensions about imperial decline, urban decay and unpoliced borders onto Jews from Eastern Europe migrating westwards. The myriad of representations of the 'alien Jew' that emerged were the product of, but also a catalyst for, a decisive moment in Britain's legal history: the fight for the 1905 Aliens Act. Drawing upon a richly diverse collection of social and political commentary, including fiction, political testimony, ethnography, travel writing, journalism and cartography, this volume traces the shifting rhetoric around alien Jews as they journeyed from the Russian Pale of Settlement to London's East End. By employing a unique and innovative reading of both the aliens debate and racialized discourse concerned with 'the Jew', Hannah Ewence demonstrates that ideas about 'space' and 'place' critically informed how migrants were viewed; an argument which remains valid in today's world.


Alienated Minority: The Jews of Medieval Latin Europe
Alienated Minority
The Jews of Medieval Latin Europe
Paperback      ISBN: 0674015932

This narrative history surveying one thousand years of Jewish life integrates the Jewish experience into the context of the overall culture and society of medieval Europe. It presents a new picture of the interaction between Christians and Jews in this tumultuous era. Alienated Minority shows us what it meant to be a Jew in Europe in the Middle Ages. The story begins in the fifth century, when autonomous Jewish rule in Palestine came to a close, and when the papacy, led by Gregory the Great, established enduring principles regarding Christian policy toward Jews. Kenneth Stow examines the structures of self-government in the European Jewish community and the centrality of emerging concepts of representation. He studies economic enterprise, especially banking; constructs a clear image of the medieval Jewish family; and portrays in detail the very rich Jewish intellectual life. Analyzing policies of Church and State in the Middle Ages, Stow argues that a firmly defined legal and constitutional position of the Jewish minority in the earlier period gave way to a legal status created expressly for Jews, who in the later period were seen as inimical to the common good. It was this special status that paved the way for the royal expulsions of Jews that began at the end of the thirteenth century.

America's Jewish Women: A History from Colonial Times to Today
America's Jewish Women
A History from Colonial Times to Today
Hardcover      ISBN: 0393651231

Pamela S. Nadell weaves together the complex story of Jewish women in America--from colonial-era matriarch Grace Nathan and her great-granddaughter, poet Emma Lazarus, to Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg. Recounting how Jewish women have been at the forefront of social, economic, and political causes for centuries, Nadell shows them fighting for suffrage, labor unions, civil rights, feminism, and religious rights--shaping a distinctly Jewish American identity.

American Jewry and the Holocaust: The American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee, 1939-1945
American Jewry and the Holocaust
The American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee, 1939-1945
Paperback      ISBN: 0814343481

In this volume Yehudi Bauer describes the efforts made to aid European victims of World War II by the New York-based American Jewish Joint Distribution Committee, American Jewry's chief representative abroad. Drawing on the mass of unpublished material in the JDC archives and other repositories, as well as on his thorough knowledge of recent and continuing research into the Holocaust, he focuses alternately on the personalities and institutional decisions in New York and their effects on the JDC workers and their rescue efforts in Europe. He balances personal stories with a country-by-country account of the fate of Jews through ought the war years: the grim statistics of millions deported and killed are set in the context of the hopes and frustrations of the heroic individuals and small groups who actively worked to prevent the Nazis' Final Solution.

This study is essential reading for anyone who seeks to understand the American Jewish response to European events from 1939 to 1945. Bauer confronts the tremendous moral and historical questions arising from JDC's activities. How great was the danger? Who should be saved first? Was it justified to use illegal or extralegal means? What country would accept Jewish refugees? His analysis also raises an issue which perhaps can never be answered: could American Jews have done more if they had grasped the reality of the Holocaust?

American Refugee Policy and European Jewry, 1933-1945
American Refugee Policy and European Jewry, 1933-1945
Hardcover      ISBN: 0253304156

How does one explain America's failure to take bold action to resist the Nazi persecution and murder of European Jews? In contrast to recent writers who place the blame on anti-Semitism in American society at large and within the Roosevelt administration in particular, Richard Breitman and Alan M. Kraut seek the answer in a detailed analysis of American political realities and bureaucratic processes. Drawing on exhaustive archival research, the authors describe and analyze American immigration policy as well as rescue and relief efforts directed toward European Jewry between 1933 and 1945. They contend that U.S. policy was the product of preexisting restrictive immigration laws; an entrenched State Department bureaucracy committed to a narrow defense of American interests; public opposition to any increase in immigration; and the reluctance of Franklin D. Roosevelt to accept the political risks of humanitarian measures to benefit the European Jews. The authors find that the bureaucrats who made and implemented refugee policy were motivated by institutional priorities and reluctance to take risks, rather than by moral or humanitarian concerns.

Ana Pauker: The Rise and Fall of a Jewish Communist
Ana Pauker
The Rise and Fall of a Jewish Communist
Hardcover      ISBN: 0520223950

In her own day, Ana Pauker was named "The Most Powerful Woman in the World" by Time magazine. Today, when she is remembered at all, she is thought of as the puppet of Soviet communism in Romania, blindly enforcing the most brutal and repressive Stalinist regime. Robert Levy's new biography changes the picture dramatically, revealing a woman of remarkable strength, dominated by conflict and contradiction far more than by dogmatism. Telling the story of Pauker's youth in an increasingly anti-Semitic environment, her commitment to a revolutionary career, and her rise in the Romanian Communist movement, Levy makes no attempt to whitewash Pauker's life and actions, but rather explores every contour of the complicated persona he found expressed in masses of newly accessible archival documents.

Ancient Israel: Its Life and Instructions
Ancient Israel
Its Life and Instructions
Paperback      ISBN: 080284278x

Considered by many to be a modern classic, Ancient Israel offers a fascinating, full-scale reconstruction of the social and religious life of Israel in Old Testament times. Drawing principally on the text of the Old Testament itself, as well as from archaeological evidence and information gathered from the historical study of Israel's neighbors, de Vaux first provides an extensive introduction to the nomadic nature of life in ancient Israel and then traces in detail the developments of Israel's most important institutions-family, civil, military, and religious-and their influence on the nation's life and history. "The timely reprint of the English translation of de Vaux's monumental work.makes this available again for all students of the OT at all levels.. This collection of data is still relevant, reliable and a good starting point for these sociological studies." --Society for Old Testament Study Book List "A monument both of progress in biblical exegesis within the Catholic tradition and of mainstream biblical scholarship in the middle decades of this century." --Journal of Near Eastern Studies