Psychological Aspects of Bereavement
The Hot Young Widows Club: Lessons on Survival from the Front Lines of Grief
The Hot Young Widows Club
Lessons on Survival from the Front Lines of Grief
Hardcover      ISBN: 198210998x
From the host of the popular podcast, Terrible, Thanks for Asking, comes a wise, humorous roadmap and caring resource for anyone going through the loss of a loved one
Journey to the Afterlife: Comforting Messages & Lessons from Loved Ones in Spirit
Journey to the Afterlife
Comforting Messages & Lessons from Loved Ones in Spirit
Paperback      ISBN: 073875269x
True Stories from the Other Side Lessons, Warnings, Wisdom & Joy Journey to the Afterlife reveals the true nature of heaven, hell, and the in-between from spirits who are there. Join Kristy Robinett as she shares soul-stirring messages from her many years of practice as a professional psychic medium. This book answers the most persistent questions about the afterlife, showing what kinds of lessons are learned as spirits evolve and grow in light and peace. Have you ever wondered what heaven is like? Or how a child's experience of the afterlife is different than an adult's? Is there such a thing as hell or purgatory? With dozens of moving case studies and remarkable examples, Journey to the Afterlife shows how our loved ones are given the opportunity to grow and find happiness on the other side. These messages are a great comfort to Kristy's clients, and they will touch your heart while helping you move forward on your own personal journey.
On Living
On Living
Paperback      ISBN: 1594634823
"A poetic and philosophical and brave and uplifting meditation on how important it is to make peace and meaning of our lives while we still have them.” –Elizabeth Gilbert, bestselling author of Eat Pray Love "Illuminating, unflinching and ultimately inspiring... A book to treasure.” –People Magazine A hospice chaplain passes on wisdom on giving meaning to life, from those taking leave of it. As a hospice chaplain, Kerry Egan didn’t offer sermons or prayers, unless they were requested; in fact, she found, the dying rarely want to talk about God, at least not overtly. Instead, she discovered she’d been granted a powerful chance to witness firsthand what she calls the “spiritual work of dying”—the work of finding or making meaning of one’s life, the experiences it’s contained and the people who have touched it, the betrayals, wounds, unfinished business, and unrealized dreams. Instead of talking, she mainly listened: to stories of hope and regret, shame and pride, mystery and revelation and secrets held too long. Most of all, though, she listened as her patients talked about love—love for their children and partners and friends; love they didn’t know how to offer; love they gave unconditionally; love they, sometimes belatedly, learned to grant themselves. This isn’t a book about dying—it’s a book about living. And Egan isn’t just passively bearing witness to these stories. An emergency procedure during the birth of her first child left her physically whole but emotionally and spiritually adrift. Her work as a hospice chaplain healed her, from a brokenness she came to see we all share. Each of her patients taught her something about what matters in the end—how to find courage in the face of fear or the strength to make amends; how to be profoundly compassionate and fiercely empathetic; how to see the world in grays instead of black and white. In this hopeful, moving, and beautiful book, she passes along all their precious and necessary gifts.
A Grief Observed
A Grief Observed
Paperback      ISBN: 0060652381
The author recounts his grief over the death of his wife, and explains how he reexamined his religious beliefs.
Advice for Future Corpses and Those Who Love Them: A Practical Perspective on Death and Dying
Advice for Future Corpses and Those Who Love Them
A Practical Perspective on Death and Dying
Paperback      ISBN: 1501182188
A NEW YORK TIMES BOOK CRITICS’ TOP 10 BOOK OF THE YEAR “In its loving, fierce specificity, this book on how to die is also a blessedly saccharine-free guide for how to live” (The New York Times). Former NEA fellow and Pushcart Prize-winning writer Sallie Tisdale offers a lyrical, thought-provoking, yet practical perspective on death and dying in Advice for Future Corpses (and Those Who Love Them). Informed by her many years working as a nurse, with more than a decade in palliative care, Tisdale provides a frank, direct, and compassionate meditation on the inevitable. From the sublime (the faint sound of Mozart as you take your last breath) to the ridiculous (lessons on how to close the sagging jaw of a corpse), Tisdale leads us through the peaks and troughs of death with a calm, wise, and humorous hand. Advice for Future Corpses is more than a how-to manual or a spiritual bible: it is a graceful compilation of honest and intimate anecdotes based on the deaths Tisdale has witnessed in her work and life, as well as stories from cultures, traditions, and literature around the world. Tisdale explores all the heartbreaking, beautiful, terrifying, confusing, absurd, and even joyful experiences that accompany the work of dying, including: A Good Death: What does it mean to die “a good death”? Can there be more than one kind of good death? What can I do to make my death, or the deaths of my loved ones, good? Communication: What to say and not to say, what to ask, and when, from the dying, loved ones, doctors, and more. Last Months, Weeks, Days, and Hours: What you might expect, physically and emotionally, including the limitations, freedoms, pain, and joy of this unique time. Bodies: What happens to a body after death? What options are available to me after my death, and how do I choose—and make sure my wishes are followed? Grief: “Grief is the story that must be told over and over...Grief is the breath after the last one.” Beautifully written and compulsively readable, Advice for Future Corpses offers the resources and reassurance that we all need for planning the ends of our lives, and is essential reading for future corpses everywhere. “Sallie Tisdale’s elegantly understated new book pretends to be a user’s guide when in fact it’s a profound meditation” (David Shields, bestselling author of Reality Hunger).
All at Sea: A Memoir
All at Sea
A Memoir
Hardcover      ISBN: 0385540655
A memoir from an award-winning journalist at The Guardian describes how her life changed forever when her boyfriend was swept out to sea attempting to save her 4-year old son from a rogue wave in Jamaica.
Late Migrations: A Natural History of Love and Loss
Late Migrations
A Natural History of Love and Loss
Hardcover      ISBN: 1571313788
The widely followed New York Times opinion writer presents a collection of brief essays on the natural world, her Alabama childhood, her complicated parents and her transition to the role of a caregiver.
Grieving - The Sacred Art: Hope in the Land of Loss
Grieving - The Sacred Art
Hope in the Land of Loss
Paperback      ISBN: 1594736340
For most people, the pain of loss dominates their experience of grief. Grief then becomes something to be avoided or completed as quickly as possible. In her new book, Lisa Irish presents grief as our
Once More We Saw Stars
Once More We Saw Stars
Hardcover      ISBN: 1524733539
Devastated by his 2-year-old daughter's accidental death, a father in Upper West Side Manhattan navigates unendurable pain and taps the healing power of love to rebuild his shattered family. A first book.
All Things Consoled: A Daughter's Memoir
All Things Consoled
A Daughter's Memoir
Paperback      ISBN: 0771039751
From Elizabeth Hay, one of Canada's beloved novelists, comes a startling and beautiful memoir about the drama of her parents' end, and the longer drama of being their daughter. Winner of the 2018 Hilary Weston Writers' Trust Prize for Nonficiton. Jean and Gordon Hay were a colourful, formidable pair. Jean, a late-blooming artist with a marvellous sense of humour, was superlatively frugal; nothing got wasted, not even maggoty soup. Gordon was a proud and ambitious schoolteacher with a terrifying temper, a deep streak of melancholy, and a devotion to flowers, cars, words, and his wife. As old age collides with the tragedy of living too long, these once ferociously independent parents become increasingly dependent on Lizzie, the so-called difficult child. By looking after them in their final decline, she hopes to prove that she can be a good daughter after all. In this courageous memoir, written with tough-minded candour, tenderness, and wit, Elizabeth Hay lays bare the exquisite agony of a family's dynamics--entrenched favouritism, sibling rivalries, grievances that last for decades, genuine admiration, and enduring love. In the end, she reaches a more complete understanding of the most unforgettable characters she will ever know, the vivid giants in her life who were her parents.