Vocal Music
Voice Studies: Critical Approaches to Process, Performance and Experience
Voice Studies
Critical Approaches to Process, Performance and Experience
Paperback      ISBN: 1138809357

Voice Studies brings together leading international scholars and practitioners, to re-examine what voice is, what voice does, and what we mean by "voice studies" in the process and experience of performance. This dynamic and interdisciplinary publication draws on a broad range of approaches, from composing and voice teaching through to psychoanalysis and philosophy, including:

    • voice training from the Alexander Technique to practice-as-research;
    • operatic and extended voices in early baroque and contemporary underwater singing;
    • voices across cultures, from site-specific choral performance in Kentish mines and Australian sound art, to the laments of Kraho Indians, Korean pansori and Javanese wayang;
    • voice, embodiment and gender in Robertson's 1798 production of Phantasmagoria, Cathy Berberian radio show, and Romeo Castellucci's theatre;
    • perceiving voice as a composer, listener, or as eavesdropper;
    • voice, technology and mobile apps.

With contributions spanning six continents, the volume considers the processes of teaching or writing for voice, the performance of voice in theatre, live art, music, and on recordings, and the experience of voice in acoustic perception and research. It concludes with a multifaceted series of short provocations that simply revisit the core question of the whole volume: what is voice studies?

Voices of Combat: A Century of Liberty and War Songs, 1765-1865
Voices of Combat
A Century of Liberty and War Songs, 1765-1865
Hardcover      ISBN: 0313254087

This study of American liberty and war songs is among the first to examine them in a historical and literary context and to focus almost exclusively on the lyrics. Unlike other works that are primarily songbooks, this book provides a fresh view of an important aspect of American culture and offers new insight into the thoughts and feelings of Americans during periods of crisis. Special attention is given to the songs that emerged from the early American wartime experiences, including those written before and during the Revolution, the War of 1812, the Mexican War, and the Civil War, with an emphasis on the similarities and differences in song themes, techniques and styles.

The Well-Tun'd Word: Musical Interpretations of English Poetry, 1597-1651
The Well-Tun'd Word
Musical Interpretations of English Poetry, 1597-1651
Paperback      ISBN: 0816657998

The Well-Tun'd Word was first published in 1982. Minnesota Archive Editions uses digital technology to make long-unavailable books once again accessible, and are published unaltered from the original University of Minnesota Press editions.

The years 1957-1651 marked a period of high achievement in the history of song. In The Well-Tun'd Word Elise Bickford Jorgens studies changing musical conventions of English song in relation to new patterns in poetic taste from the late Elizabethan era through the Jacobean and Caroline years, basing her work on the premise that any musical setting of a poem is an interpretation of the poem itself. Thus by 1625, she contends, solo song in England had undergone a pronounced change in musical style, from the lute song of earlier decades to the monophonic continuo song. The appearance of John Donne and especially Ben Johnson and the Cavalier poets marked the demise of the Elizabethan lyrical mode that had inspired composers like John Downland, Thomas Campion, John Danyel, and Robert Jones.

Jorgen's opening chapters describe and illustrate elements of the craft of poetry and the musical conventions that can represent them. Her presentation is both clear and thorough, and will be especially helpful for students and scholars of English literature who are not necessarily musicians. She then discusses four major categories of song: Measured Music, Dance Songs and Tuneful Airs, English Monody, and Pathetic Airs, and notes that influence upon them of Continental music styles. But her major effort is to distinguish between them by pointing out their several characteristic attitudes towards the musical representation of poetic texts. All four groups show patterns of change during the first half of the seventeenth century.

Jorgens concludes that the celebrated union of the "sister arts" for which Elizabethan song was renowned was increasingly difficult to maintain after about 1610. Poets no longer favored those elements of poetic style that could in turn produce pleasing musical styles. Solo songs became, with continuo composers like Henry and William Lawes, Nicholas Lanier, and John Wilson, either notated recitations of poetry or simple pleasant trifles.